Carolina Wildlife Posts

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

Quick Pics

July 17th, 2014
Retro

Retro

100_5502

Mudsy

Franklin

Franklin

Auggie

Auggie

Salt

Salt

Zoe

Zoe

Gus

Gus

Canebrake

Canebrake

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

A Look Back … Part 1

June 24th, 2014

Let’s take a look back at some of the goings on in the Animal Department. Some of these critters have moved on to further their careers and education, some of them have retired, some of them have passed away and some of them are still with us in the Animal Department, just older and wiser now! I have 10 years worth of memories and pictures of all the happenings in the Department… here are a few of my favorites! Keep your eyes peeled for many more to come!!!

Ursula

Ursula

Yona post surgery

Yona post surgery

Mikey

Mikey

Jill post surgery

Jill post surgery

Annie and Sonny

Annie and Sonny

Pig

Pig

Gizmo

Gizmo

Templeton

Templeton

Young Gus

Young Gus

1227 Red Wolf

1227 Red Wolf

Beaker

Beaker

Sonny and Cher

Sonny and Cher

Kerby in Q

Kerby in Q

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Common mistake with snakes

May 13th, 2014

A lot of times I go and check on the animals in Carolina Wildlife. When I walk out I hear a lot of comments adults make to children. Some of the comments are correct and some of them are very false. One that drives me crazy is hearing people over at the snakes warning kids to avoid snakes with triangle heads because they are poisonous. Now, I do agree in avoiding the snakes, but 2 things wrong with the advice is  snakes aren’t poisonous, they are venomous and a lot of snakes have triangular shaped heads…not just the venomous kind. I found this excerpt in the herpsofnc website.

” there is no simple way to distinguish between a venomous snake and a non-venomous snake.  The best possible advice one can follow is that any snake that cannot be positively identified as harmless should not be handled.  Many people believe that all snakes with triangular-shaped heads are potentially venomous.  Although all pit vipers (rattlesnakes, copperheads, cottonmouths) in the eastern United States have broad triangular heads, so do some non-venomous species such as water snakes (Nerodia).  In addition, a non triangular head does not signify the absence of venom: the two species of coral snakes in the United States, both venomous, have slender heads with little distinction between head and neck.  Another over generalization is that venomous snakes have elliptical pupils, whereas all harmless snakes have round pupils; however venomous coral snakes also have round pupils.  Unfortunately, no single rule separates all venomous species from all of the harmless ones.”

snakehdsPhoto

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

QuikPic: Styx

May 7th, 2014

StyxOwl

 

It might not be award worthy photography, but I thought you might like to see my favorite photo of Styx. We have three Eastern Screech-Owls living in Carolina Wildlife: Badeye, Robin and Styx.

Come visit them next time you’re here!

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Awesome picture!

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. Styx seems to be giving the “My mouse, get your own” look.

    Posted by HRvdB
  3. Keeper Comment :

    My favorite is when you get to see Bad Eye grooming Robin Owl. So cute!!!

    Posted by Katy Harringer

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

A dream has been answered

April 19th, 2014

A few weeks ago I wrote a little post about animals dreaming. I included a picture of what I thought our woodchuck Henry possibly dreams about. A nice individual who reads our blog granted Henry’s dream come true.

Here are 2 pictures.

 

Join the conversation:

  1. this nice individual dropped of 2 pineapples and 4 mango just two days ago.
    Thanks Donna!!!

    Posted by sherry

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Dream a little dream

February 28th, 2014

Have you ever wondered if animals dream?  There’s no doubt in my mind they do and a while ago MIT did research and found out that animals do indeed dream. Here is the article.

Often I wonder what our animals could be dreaming of. Below is a guess of mine:

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

New Songbirds

February 13th, 2014

We’ve got some new birds that will be heading to the Aviary in Carolina Wildlife soon. All the birds were found injured in Tennessee and could not be released to the wild with their injuries. They arrived at the Museum in January and have been behind the scenes in quarantine. None of them can fly, so look low in the Aviary in the next few weeks to see our new residents.

 

2 of our new mourning doves

the killdeer, and one of the mourning doves

 

our newest Robin has a red band on its leg.

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Super Bowl XLVIII

February 1st, 2014

The Super Bowl is coming up and happens to be on Ground Hog Day. We’ve done several posts on Ground Hog day because of  Henry. Previously, we did Super Bowl predictions a few times. Henry managed to make his choice again for 2014, when the Denver Broncos will be playing Seattle Seahawks.

YouTube Preview Image

If Henry happens to guess wrong, I know a few people who will be VERY disappointed!

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Henry has been wrong for 3 or 4 years in a row so for all you gamblers out there I recommend for next year you pick the opposite of what Henry picks!!!

    Posted by Katy

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Big Word of the Month: Prehensile

January 21st, 2014

If you’ve been to a Meet the Keeper program at Lemurs, you may have heard someone ask if the Red Ruffed Lemurs have “thumbs” or “fingers” on the ends of their tails. The answer is “no”; the little bit of naked tail that sticks out in varying lengths from the normally furry tails of our lemurs is a by-product of over grooming. The Red Ruffed lemurs will occasionally groom their tail tips by licking, chewing or rubbing at them with their fingers and subsequently, have removed tufts of fur from the ends. The naked bit of tail can bend and curl just like the rest of their tails, but it isn’t prehensile.

So what exactly is “prehensile”?

It’s defined as an appendage or organ found on a vertebrate animal that has the ability to grasp or hold.

Though the definition seems simple enough,  it’s not always so black and white. Think about the tail of a Virginia Opossum or the lips on a rhino or donkey. They have the ability to grasp or manipulate objects, but can’t really hang on tightly. In those cases, the appendage is considered “semi-prehensile.”

 

Here are some examples of prehensile appendages in the animal world: new world monkey tail (like Spider Monkeys), octopus arms, chameleon feet, prehensile-tailed porcupine tails, Giraffe tongues, primates with a thumb have prehensile hands and sygnathidae tails.

Photo Credit: ARKive.org
Photo Credit (Prehensile tailed porcupine): The Creature Teachers, Littleton, Mass.
Lycus the Lemur is our photo.

Here are a few more “semi-prehensile” appendages: elephant trunk tip, camel lips and snake tails.

Photo Credit (elephant): ARKive.org
Photo Credit (camel): ImageShack user “poojambasaurus”
The grumpy baby Northern pinesnake is our photo

 

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

Why You Should Always Carry A Camera: Reason 1

December 28th, 2013

Every morning Henry, the woodchuck, gets an Efa Capsule to keep his skin and coat looking good. Usually he takes his medicine very well especially if you put it on banana, a piece of bread or if he is really lucky on a Henry sized peanut butter sandwich. This morning when I opened Henry’s door to give him his medication I was greeted by him sitting in his bed, staring at me, patiently waiting for his medicine. Upon closer inspection I noticed he had a walnut shell placed just perfect over the tip of his nose, just like Rudolph, but instead of a red nose he had a walnut nose! No words can explain how adorable this was and how bummed I was to know I wasn’t carrying a camera! So instead of that adorable picture of Henry I leave you with these.

Henry

Henry making his bed.

Henry checking out Barred Owls.

Henry checking out my jacket.

Join the conversation:

  1. awwwwwww!!!

    Posted by Jill
  2. He’s the greatest!

    Posted by Shawntel

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