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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

Max’s Medication

April 5th, 2014

A couple of weeks ago Max, the steer, wasn’t feeling very well. He had some loose stool, a runny nose and wasn’t as interested in his food as normal. We had Dr. Cannedy come out to look at him to find out what was wrong. Dr. Cannedy came out and gave Max some medication to help with his stool quality as well as medication to help with the other symptoms. One of the issues was Max had an intestinal parasite. In order to treat this parasite Dr. Cannedy gave us medication to give to Max for the next 4 days. We were to give Max 2 tablets crushed into his chow with a little molasses dribbled over it to cover up the taste. Max weighs 774.0 kg (1702.8 lbs.) so his medication is a lot larger than what many of our other animals would get. Below are pictures of Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 029

Max’s medication is on the Right – 2 of these tablets per day crushed into food. The medications on the Left are an Aspirin tablet, Cosequin capsule, Baytril tablet and a Papaya pill.

2014 Mar 13 032

Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 030

Side view of Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 033

Max taking his medication like a good boy!!!

Max took his medication very well. The molasses helped a great deal! Max was also given Gatorade water which he drinks very quickly! And now Max is doing much better and is almost completely back to his normal self!

Join the conversation:

  1. the photos, even with the ruler and coins, don’t do justice to just how big these pills were!

    Posted by sherry

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

National Frog Month

April 2nd, 2014

April is National Frog Month!

Zoe is celebrating

Join the conversation:

  1. He’s so handsome (both as a turtle and a frog)!!!

    Posted by Katy

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Dream a little dream

February 28th, 2014

Have you ever wondered if animals dream?  There’s no doubt in my mind they do and a while ago MIT did research and found out that animals do indeed dream. Here is the article.

Often I wonder what our animals could be dreaming of. Below is a guess of mine:

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Jackson Pollock

February 19th, 2014

*NOTE* This blog was scheduled for the 28th of January, but it kept getting moved!!! Pretend its January 28th.

What does this animal blog have to do with Jackson Pollock?  For starters, its his birthday today  and for those of you who have never heard of him, he is well known for “drip” style painting.

Photo

Personally, I am not much of a fan of abstract art. I tend to like the more traditional Baroque style like Rembrandt.

The Nightwatch

Photo

Then I was reminded that we have some famous artists in our midst around the department who are the more abstract art type and would appreciate Pollocks birthday.

Franklin

Box Turtle “B”

Galileo

 

I have to say I would rather have a Franklin adorn my walls at home than a Pollock.

Join the conversation:

  1. I treasure my animal art – Thank you Jill and Sarah!

    Posted by Wendy
  2. I agree with you Jill, like the traditional stuff myself.
    And, along with you, I would much rather have a Franklin, BT “B,” or Galileo than a Pollock.

    Posted by Ranger Greg

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.
Tags: , ,

Interns Learn A Lesson

February 16th, 2014

Being an Animal Keeper requires you to carry certain items with you throughout the day. One of these is a large key ring full of keys. Every once in awhile you will stumble upon a set of keys that have lost their owner. When this happens usually the Keeper who found the keys will relocate them to make it even more difficult for the owner of the keys to find them. This is exactly what happened when a certain Keeper (who shall remain nameless) found a set of unattended intern keys.

Found Keys

Join the conversation:

  1. Great to see the dedication and awareness the keeper who found the keys used to ensure none of the Museum’s animals could be harmed by the loose keys after they were so diligently placed out of harms way.

    :)

    Posted by HRvdb
  2. Yes, exactly

    Posted by Jill

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.
Tags: , ,

Limerick –answer

February 10th, 2014

The limerick quiz is here, if you want to read it before seeing the answer below

 

 

Answer:

 

Our knives, of course!!

We keep our knives safely tucked away in pockets or our backpacks, but they come in quite handy for routine things like cutting open a bag of chow or cutting bale strings off hay.

Join the conversation:

  1. Secondary game:
    Match the keeper to their knife.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. Keeper Comment :

    You first, Ro!

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg
  3. left to right:
    Jessie
    Sarah
    Jill
    Katy

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  4. Keeper Comment :

    1 of 4 correct, Ro.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg
  5. Spoiler alert….mine isn’t pictured.

    Posted by Katy
  6. Jessi
    Jessi
    Jessi
    Jessi

    (oh wait… Jessi only carries 3 knives so that cannot be right)

    Posted by sherry
  7. Keeper Comment :

    From Left to Right:
    Sarah
    Sarah
    Kent
    Autumn

    I’m pretty sure most of us carry multiple knives. I know Jessi and I carry at least 3 (I wouldn’t be surprised if either of us had a 4th we forget about in our lockers), and I think Kent and Jill both have 2.

    They’re sharp and shiny, what’s not to like?

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Where are the Ring-Tailed Lemurs?

January 30th, 2014

It has been cold lately and that means that the Ring-tailed lemurs have been inside in their indoor holding area.  Since they are inside, we want to make sure that they are getting enriched.  A recent enrichment item that we have used for the lemurs is skewering dried fruit on pumpkins or like in the following pictures on paper towel tubes.

Cassandra and Satyrus. What is this?

 

Satyrus was interested in the new item once Cassandra had inspected it first.

 

Cassandra getting an apricot.

 

Satyrus scent marking the item after eating his fill of apricots.

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Glad Cassandra and Satyrus were comfy and warm. Wondering what the red square with the red x is for? Thank you.

    Posted by dj
  2. Keeper Comment :

    I can answer that, DJ.

    The red box with the X was part of a behavior the Ringtails were learning. The goal was to have them put both their hands in the box and have their back facing the keeper. It’s a harder task to train than you might think, the Ringtails always seem to keep an eye on the keeper that’s working with them and as a team, there was a lot of walking in circles. The hope was that we could then train them to stay there with their hands on the wall so we could look at their back, fur, or apply medication to their skin if we needed to.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.
Tags: , ,

Limerick + Quiz = Quizerick?

January 27th, 2014

Sherry’s Christmas 2013 post got me thinking (or rhyming?). It’s been a while since I wrote a poem!

On that note, a limerick quiz to get you thinking:

 

Our tools are eclectic and many

but one keepers love more than any.

A little different are all;

some large and some small.

This is one tool we have in plenty.

 

It’s a bit of a tough guess, but give it a try!

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. What about shovels to pick up plenty of stuff?

    Posted by dj
  2. What about your hands, useful “tool” for all sorts of things.

    Posted by HvdB
  3. If hands isn’t the answer, Auggie, Miss Piggy, the lemurs and the bears think food is a wonderful and yummy tool for enrichment and training.

    Posted by dj
  4. Keeper Comment :

    Hands and Shovels are both really good guesses, but what I had in mind was a little different. It’s an actual tool that most of us keepers carry with us for both routine and unexpected reasons. It’s a bit hard to carry a shovel with you all the time.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg
  5. A pocket knife (since you usually carry one in your pocket wherever you go)

    Posted by Carrie
  6. A knife (since you usually carry one in your pocket wherever you go)

    Posted by Carrie
  7. a multi-tool.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  8. a communication device like a cell phone, pager or walkie talkie??

    Posted by dj
  9. Keeper Comment :

    Now we’re getting somewhere! The answer will post in a few days…just to keep you all waiting.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg
  10. Hi Sarah,

    A bit of the past but still enjoy your poems..:)

  11. Keeper Comment :

    I’m glad you enjoy them!

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Brr, it’s cold…where are the bears?

January 24th, 2014

Our bear exhibit is large and it can be difficult to spot a bear in normal weather but when it is cold it can be very difficult.  So, where are the bears when it is very cold?

(Below) Yona in her hay bed on top of the cliff, in the background you can see the bear house where another bear likes to spend her time.

(Below) Va in her hay bed on the cliff but it is on the opposite side of the cliff so that she is away from Yona.

(Below)  Sweet Mimi in her stall o’ hay.  She can be rather difficult to get up in the mornings to go outside.

(Below)  Gus has claimed the cave as his own.  In this pic, it is difficult to see him and on most days all you see is either one of his big ears or his rump.

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. You have to wake Mimi up in a nice and gentle way or she is very grumpy. I usually say “MiiiiiMiiiiii, wake up, time to get up”. She wont even lift her head up to acknowledge me.

    Posted by Jill

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.
Tags: , ,

2013 Animal Department Holiday Potluck Highlights

January 12th, 2014

Every year the Animal Department gets together with our volunteers and has a holiday potluck. There is always good food and good conversations as well as gifts for everyone to enjoy.  Here are some of the highlights of our potluck we had in December.

Kent.

Kent with his beads!

 

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