by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

New Lemurs

August 17th, 2014

Surprise, our blog is not down nor re-designed. That will happen soon. Instead, let me show you some photos of our new lemurs. All the photos are of the lemurs at the Toledo Zoo. You’ll be able to see the five boys here starting on August 18th- come on by and look for them in the Indoor Viewing area and meet Oliver, Maky, Misa, dan, and Henri.

new lemurs with mom

 

new lemur boy

 

new lemurs group

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

We’re taking a break… be back soon

August 14th, 2014

Hi blog readers. The Museum website and our blog are being redesigned. We’ll be back after the 18th with our new design. For now, enjoy the photos of Virginia.

Virginia gets a melon

Virginia gets a melon

drying off

drying off

 

Virginia snacking

Virginia snacking

 

 

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

On top of the world…well the hide structure actually…

August 11th, 2014

All of the animals at the museum get enrichment…here are few posts about enrichment.  There are many times where we make awesome enrichment that we think the animals will enjoy but it turns out they are uninterested.  Then there are the times when they are interested in the enrichment which means picture time.

In the picture below, one of our Box Turtles is enriching himself despite us providing different types of enrichment.   As long as they are interacting with their environment, then I am happy that they are being enriched.

Box B on house

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Aaron and Katy

August 8th, 2014

Sometimes I find our two Lead Keepers in serious discussion. Other times I find them like so:

 

trimming the nails of wiggly ferrets

trimming the nails of wiggly ferrets

 

I get a smile from Katy and Aaron- Success!

I get a smile from Katy and Aaron: Success!

 

I was cleaning up the hall and found a big pad of paper. Katy decided to hang it on the wall and play hangman. Aaron filled it in with his answer. (It was not the puzzle Katy had in mind).

aaron and katy

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by , Keeper
I started out as a volunteer in February 2013 and became a full fledged keeper in October 2013. I love birds, mainly raptors. When I'm not working I like to read and play tennis. I have two dogs and two cats.
I work Tuesday through Saturday mostly out in Explore the Wild. You might be able to see me at the Meet the Keeper program at 2:00pm or training the Lemurs!

Having fun with Bear Enrichment

August 5th, 2014

Enriching the lives of our animals is a daily task for us keepers. When I have the time, I like to be a little more creative with my enrichment ideas. The other day I decided to put a table and four chairs into the bear side yard. I carefully picked out the tallest chair for Gus and the shortest chair for Yona. Mimi and Virginia received similar sized chairs. To entice them to actually check out my creation, I wrote all of their names in syrup and decorated the table and chairs with raisins!

Up close look at the yummy treats!

Up close look at the yummy treats!

A table with four chairs and a place setting for all the bears!

A table with four chairs and a place setting for all the bears!

When I came back in the next day, all of the chairs and the table were knocked over and all the treats consumed! I would say they had a pretty nice dinner party!

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  1. What, no tea?

    Posted by Wendy

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

2014 Red Wolf SSP meeting

August 2nd, 2014
Erik from Wolf Haven International made this during dinner at the 2013 SSP meeting. I was so glad he shared it with us !

Erik from Wolf Haven International made this during dinner at the 2013 SSP meeting. I was so glad he shared it with us !

Besides picking up lemurs last week in Ohio, I also had the Red Wolf SSP planning meeting. Akron Zoo was a wonderful host, and a beautiful Zoo. We talked about so many things that my head is still spinning: information about captive wolves, wild wolves, veterinary research, enrichment, capture and restraint, and so much more. We spent one whole day discussing husbandry issues, such as enrichment and diets. We also saw several videos on different ways to “catch-up” wolves (Hence Erik’s photo). It’s really helpful for the group to see how other institutions do “things” so we can share, learn, and adapt.

 

many of my counterparts from other institutions that house red wolves.

many of my counterparts from other institutions that house red wolves.

I spent most of the three days sitting around a table. Will Waddell brought his important paperwork in the following folders:

RWSSP folder 2RWSSP folder

We did get a chance to wander around, as well as go behind the scenes. I was busy taking photos of dry erase boards, signs, fences, recycling bins, windows, locks,  and such.  I don’t have animal photos to share with you, but rather the incredibly interesting photos to follow:

locks behind the scenes at the Grizzly exhibit

locks behind the scenes at the Grizzly exhibit

 

Everyone has issues with people sitting on fences. This is what Akron did in one of their exhibit areas to prevent folks from sitting on top.

Everyone has issues with people sitting on fences. This is what Akron did in one of their exhibit areas to prevent folks from sitting on top.

photos 019photos 048

And let’s not forget the different charts and notes that everyone seems to post:

RWSSP frdige temps

RWSSP fridge rule

Not exactly sure yet what wolves we will have at the Museum next year, but some possibilities were identified and more news will be shared in the fall.

 

 

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

New additions… lemurs are here

July 31st, 2014

We have 5 new ring-tailed lemurs residing behind the scenes.We’ll introduce you to them over the blog in the next few weeks and you’ll be able to see them at the lemur exhibit indoor viewing area soon after that. For now,  photos of them in the van  (I drove them here from the Toledo Zoo on Saturday).

Van loaded with my five new friends as their Keepers send them off with smiles

Van loaded with my five new friends as their Keepers send them off with smiles

 

My daughter Mir, thrilled to be in the van for 11 hours with our  5 new friends

My daughter Mir, thrilled to be in the van for 11 hours with our 5 new friends

And a sneak peak of them out of the van:

 toledo

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  1. Can’t wait to meet these fellas.

    Posted by Ranger Ro

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Update: Frog Eggs

July 29th, 2014

A few weeks ago, I wrote up a post about some frog eggs we found in the alpaca pool and the tadpoles they hatched into.

I’m sorry to report that none of the tadpoles made it into frogs. However, only a few days after the last tadpole disappeared a whole new batch of eggs was laid in the alpaca pool during a night of heavy rainstorms. I collected the eggs up and the new group of tadpoles have already hatched and started swimming around. I’ll post new photos when these guys get a bit bigger; which is likely soon as this group is growing a lot faster than the first bunch did!

An interesting fact to leave you with:

It’s entirely possible that all of the tadpoles in this new batch are siblings! A single female Grey Treefrog (which is what we think these tadpoles are) can lay as many as 2,000 eggs at once!!

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by , Keeper
I started out as a volunteer in February 2013 and became a full fledged keeper in October 2013. I love birds, mainly raptors. When I'm not working I like to read and play tennis. I have two dogs and two cats.
I work Tuesday through Saturday mostly out in Explore the Wild. You might be able to see me at the Meet the Keeper program at 2:00pm or training the Lemurs!

QuickPic: Ramsey

July 27th, 2014

Ramsey, our newest bearded dragon, has quite the personality. She is very active and we tend to find her in strange positions. This is her in her outdoor sunning cage!

Ramsey in her sunning cage!

Ramsey in her sunning cage!

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Cows Have Horns, too!

July 24th, 2014

Lots of guests come into the farmyard, see Max, and call him a “cow.” I assume that a few know he’s not a cow but choose to use “cow” rather than “steer” because it’s an easier word of small kids, but I’d bet more people just don’t know what the difference is. So here’s a quick run down of the various common terms used for cattle:

Cow – A female who has had a baby (or many babies).

Heifer- A female who has not had a baby.

Bull- An intact male.

Steer- A castrated male.

Ox/Oxen- adult, male or female, trained in draft work (pulling). Often males that have been castrated as adults.

Calf- A baby, male or female.

Bullock- In the UK, a castrated male. In the USA, an intact male, less than a year old.

Cattle- either gender (or both) in a group.

 

What about the horns?

Horns are common on both males and females, especially in dairy breeds. It’s not usually possible to tell if you’re looking at a bull or cow just by looking at their face. You’d need to get a look at their bellies to tell them apart for sure. Udders are only visibly present in cows. Heifers have udders but they aren’t typically distended or visibly hanging because she’s never had a calf. Intact males are bulls, castrated males are steer.

Some cattle are naturally hornless. This is called being “polled” and is a genetic trait in cattle that can be passed down to their offspring. It’s also common for cattle on farms to have their horns removed as very young babies, so they never grow, and to have the horns on adult cattle cut or blunted so they don’t hurt each other or the people working with them. Max keeps his own horns blunted by rubbing them on all sorts of stuff, like toys, stumps, and his fence.

Max

Max, napping in the sun

jersey heifer

An adorable little Jersey heifer with her horns

Here’s a handsome naturally polled, Jersey bull from MaryJanesFarm in Idaho.

 

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