Posts Tagged ‘1287’

by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Red Wolf Pictures

May 24th, 2013

I finally figured out how to use the zoom on my phone. The wolves are difficult to snap good pictures of without a zoom.

The female, 1287

The male, 1414

the female

The male is the one facing the camera

photogenic 1414

Join the conversation:

  1. Wow these are great. I love the close up on 1414.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. Thanks!

    Posted by Kimberly
  3. I can never get enough of these beautiful animals. Great pictures Kimberly!!

    Posted by Jamie Gray
  4. Thanks Jamie

    Posted by Kimberly

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Both Wolves Howling

March 28th, 2013

Katy spent a bunch of time at the wolf exhibit the past few weeks and she had her camera!!! Check this out:

YouTube Preview Image

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Awesome video! Great job Katy.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. This is Great!

    Posted by matts

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Wolf Update

March 12th, 2013

our two wolves, male 1414 and female 1287, encased in a hopefully love-match.

 In 5-6 weeks I hope to be writing about WOLF PUPPIES.

Ranger Greg has been blogging and tweeting about what he’s seen our wolves up to. We certainly hope it’s about puppy-making. We won’t know for sure until we actually see pups since the past two years our female has gone through pseudopregnancies. We have a new male this breeding season, so with 1414 we’re hoping for some renewed hope of actual pups.

Every summer I go to the Red Wolf SSP master plan meeting. I didn’t write about this past summer’s meeting, but did take a photo of our new pair of wolves as drawn during the meeting. You also heard about our shipping out of our former male wolf (1369), including a detailed quiz about my 16 hour drive with Aaron to get 1369 to the airport in Atlanta for his trip out to WA.

Our former wolf, 1369, is doing fine out in Tacoma. I learned he sits outside the den while his new “girlfriend” sits inside the den. He was seen “snuggling” next to her during breeding season. The folks at Tacoma are going to catch him up this week and collect semen on him. (We are not sure if he is able to make pups…understand?)

So, hopefully we’ll have wonderful little additions to blog about in April.  Stay tuned.

Join the conversation:

  1. Wolf pups would be such a great thing for the red wolf captive population and for the species as a whole. I’m very excited to keep up with your blogs and to see what comes of this.

    Posted by Casey Sweet

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

No Pups…

April 28th, 2011
I wish I had better news to report, but alas, no wolf pups. There are things we know, things we assume, things we don’t know, and lots of opinions. The short story is there are no pups and the chance of pups is very low to nil at this point. No need to read on if you don’t want or need more information.
 
We know that just over 3 weeks ago, on Tuesday April 5, #1287, the female wolf, started losing hair from her belly. This fact, along with behavior changes (i.e. digging more and burying food) and confirmation by security guards that mating had been seen between the wolves, led us to believe and hope 1287 was pregnant. The timing of all this matched perfectly when 1287 started cycling and exhibiting the desire to mate (this occurred the end of January/beginning of February and there is a 63 gestation period for red wolves).
 

Wednesday April 13, we thought the female might be delivering pups: her behavior was very antsy and she spent a lot of time in the den. However, still no pups. There were no signs and there are no signs that the wolf had or has given birth.
 

 

As discussed/reported from the very beginning of the entire hubbub, the wolf could be exhibiting a pseudo pregnancy. This is a false pregnancy, where hormonally the wolf goes through all the changes she would under real pregnancy conditions. The act of mating itself can cause a pseudo pregnancy, as can regular seasonal changes. It is my opinion that pseudo pregnancy is what was/is going on.
It’s unlikely, but we still could come upon pups, and we’ll watch closely until mid/end May (May 25 is the latest date red wolves have been born).  However, we have now shifted our focus from pups to possible health issues and complications from pseudo pregnancy or other pregnancy but no delivery “issues”. As long as the female behaves and looks as she usually does we will watch and wait. If we need to catch her up and do further assessments, we will. (i.e. if scooting persist as mentioned above, of discharge is noted on her body/bottom…)
It’s very disapointing, that’s for sure.
 

 

red wolf 1287 howling

1287 in the front with some belly hair missing

Join the conversation:

  1. Such a bummer (and I’m sure it is the most for all you keepers!)–I’ll keep fingers crossed for late pups, but maybe next year!

    Posted by Libby

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: Waiting IS the hardest part.

April 16th, 2011

I know everyone is on edge waiting and hoping and waiting and angsting and waiting and wishing and the list goes on and on. We’re still very hopeful that red wolves 1287 and 1369 will become parents any day. Remember, however, she may not be pregnant and she may just be going through a pseudo pregnancy, which would obviously be overwhelmingly disappointing. We’ve still got a few more prime days, and we’re still hoping we’ll be pleasantly surprised.

In the meantime, take a look at a couple of cuties born at the Wolf Conservation Center in NY last year. If we’re fortunate, we’ll have our own bundle here to swoon over. Otherwise, we’ll try again next year…

red wolf pups, 2010 from Wolf Conservation Center.

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: red wolf update

December 2nd, 2010

We had both the male and female red wolves off exhibit last week to try to help them more positively bond with each other. It appears that the male bit the female a few weeks ago. She recovered really well from her wound, but when you see her now on exhibit you might notice her shaved neck. If you head to the wolf exhibit, please let us know what you notice our red wolves doing. Thanks!

1287

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

New Faces

October 21st, 2010

It’s been awhile since I did any sort of Spotlight- sorry. We have a bunch of new faces at the Museum and I thought I would quickly update you and share some of the changes and some of the newbies.

We’ve made posts about the new animals: Ladybell ferret, Henry the Woodchuck,  and  Red Wolf 1287. We  have other new animals too (maybe one of the Keepers will write about Jessica opossum or the new aviary birds which arrived on August 25…).

The new people are in abundance as well. With Larry and Erin departing over the summer, and Cassidy heading out next week, there are a bunch of new Keepers on board. I’ll have to do a spotlight on each of them eventually, but here are some quick photos so you can start to put a face with a  name.

Mikey

Mikey arrived in June and comes to us from the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher. (I am going to save  info about him and the others and tell you more later…)

Sarah

Sarah arrived in July. She comes from up North and was most recently working in a children’s  museum in Connecticut.

Kimberly

Kimberly just started last week. She has worked in a couple zoos in the southwest (Texas and New Mexico).

There’s a lot more to say about all the newbies mentioned above. Stay tuned to learn more. Even better, if you have questions, ask them in the comment section and I’ll write posts about whetever you want to know.

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Photos of Red Wolf 1287

October 13th, 2010

She’s only been on grounds a few hours, but I got to see what our new wolf looks like this dusky morning. Still some fairly crappy photos for you as she seemed nervous and didn’t stand still. She is acting more like I would expect her to this morning (nervous, skittish, some peeing while she moved away from me). She did bed down in the hay, she did eat a bunch of her food (she’s on a special diet…). Subjectively, she is distinctive looking, short, dark, and very pretty.

1287 head shot

Join the conversation:

  1. She’s beautiful – can’t wait to meet her! Welcome 1287!

    Posted by Debbie
  2. As the “red wolf lady” at Roger Williams Park Zoo, I know from experience that “Snoopy” is a very skittish female. I do hope she will be happy and productive with you.

    Posted by Nancy Lewis
  3. Director Comment :

    Thanks Nancy!
    We hope she and our male do well together.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  4. I am so very impressed that the museum is part of the Red Wolf Recovery Project. I’ve just done a science unit on red wolves for school. I find the keeper blog compelling. Thanks for our work.

    Posted by Nicole Baucom Hays

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Red Wolf 1287 is here!

October 13th, 2010

It’s been a long day, (although I guess it technically is tomorrow) with multiple issues, but our new red wolf female, 1287, is finally here. We learned in the Summer Red Wolf SSP Master Plan meeting that we would be getting a new female wolf to pair with our male.  She was originally due to fly in (on Delta) around 4:30 Tuesday afternoon. However, without going into details, she arrived to RDU airport around 11 PM Tuesday night.

As usual, I don’t have good photos to share yet.  I can tell you she weighs 45 pounds- which is small for a red wolf, but she looks pretty solid. Makes me think that when I see her in the daylight she will be more stocky than lean- we’ll see.  She won’t go into the wolf exhibit  for at least one week.  We’ll make sure to get some photos and give you her history in the days and weeks to come.

Katy waiting with an empty van

Jill and Mikey were supposed to pick up the wolf this afternoon, but as things became more and more delayed, the plans changed.

not our wolf

When the cargo finally arrived, the man handed me a crate with this little dog in it. It was a cute yappy thing, but not our wolf!

Red Wolf 1287 first minute at the Museum

She seemed amazingly calm when we let her out of the crate. She slinked around the side cage and did lots of sniffing. I’ll check her early tomorrow. I hope she settles in and eats. Again, sorry about the dark blurry photo.  Getting good photos was not on the priority list for the evening.

Join the conversation:

  1. So excited! Can’t wait to see the new arrival. Thanks so much for the hard work all of you did (and late hours you put in) to bring her to her new home.

    Posted by Karyn
  2. Director Comment :

    Shouldn’t you be sleeping Karyn!?!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.