Posts Tagged ‘Annie’

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

A Look Back … Part 1

June 24th, 2014

Let’s take a look back at some of the goings on in the Animal Department. Some of these critters have moved on to further their careers and education, some of them have retired, some of them have passed away and some of them are still with us in the Animal Department, just older and wiser now! I have 10 years worth of memories and pictures of all the happenings in the Department… here are a few of my favorites! Keep your eyes peeled for many more to come!!!

Ursula

Ursula

Yona post surgery

Yona post surgery

Mikey

Mikey

Jill post surgery

Jill post surgery

Annie and Sonny

Annie and Sonny

Pig

Pig

Gizmo

Gizmo

Templeton

Templeton

Young Gus

Young Gus

1227 Red Wolf

1227 Red Wolf

Beaker

Beaker

Sonny and Cher

Sonny and Cher

Kerby in Q

Kerby in Q

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

lemur physicals

August 16th, 2013

This week the red ruffed lemurs got their annual physicals.

QUIZ: who’s wearing the blue gloves, who’s wearing the white gloves, and whose sneakers are showing?

All three girls- Cynthia, Iris, and Jethys-  did great. Each one, from pre-sedation to reversal took 37 minutes. We’re waiting for blood work to come back, but everyone’s initial findings seemed to be okay. Our girls are getting old so I always have concerns about what the tests will show. Cynthia is almost 32 years old. The Duke lemur center only has one red ruffed lemur older than her.

 

Annie’s job at the end was to keep each lemur warm, make sure they awoke with no issue, and then put them in their crate.

 

Annie always takes notes during the physicals and makes sure the Dr. Vanderford and Katy get everything done on the list. This year she had an added bonus of holding the lemurs at the end.

Katy was running a rectal thermometer and an ear thermometer to see if the temperatures were the same (which they were).

Hopefully all the blood work comes back okay! In September, we’ll do physicals on the ring tailed lemurs. (More pictures then.

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  1. Blue gloves-Sherry
    White gloves-Katy
    Sitting in the chair- Annie

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. CORRECT!

    Posted by sherry

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Emergency Training: Making Darts

May 20th, 2013

Do you ever wonder what we do on closed Mondays?  (Today, we’re cleaning the bear pool).

We do several Emergency Training Drills a year and a closed Monday is the perfect opportunity. I recently wrote about lemur tracking, we also do full on drills that include fake animal escapes and or damage due to storms or trees down, you might recall when Leslie played a bear. Today’s post is about making darts.

We would potentially use a dart to sedate an escaped bear and maybe even a wolf. Our dart bags are labeled well but without practice it’s a very nerve raking experience. Here you can see several people in different stages of making darts. We of course use water as our “drug” during drills and depending on the size of the animal we would be darting, the amount of “drugs” vary. So we practice making lots and lots of darts, for all the potential animal sizes. Afterwards we go outside and practice shooting them into a target- no not one of Sherry’s stuffed animals. In the event of a real emergency there always has to be two people making darts together. So during practice we pair up in teams.

Several of us making darts, can you pick out the non-keepers in the picture?

Sarah and Maya making darts

Marilyn focusing on her darts

Annie, Katy, and Jessi

You can see the back of Mike in this picture practicing with us

 

Next, we went outside and practiced shooting our darts into two targets.

We make a radio call alerting all staff of our plans so no one accidentally walks out or wonders what in the world we are doing.

Oops Jessi missed the target

 

 

 

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Funny opossum photo

April 7th, 2013

Katy has been going through her photos and came across this one of Galileo which made us both laugh.

Annie was terrified when she found Galileo in the ball so the ball now looks like this

But, since the opossum got out of the ball just fine, Katy and I think the ball should not be labeled “not for opossum use” but rather “not for Annie use”

 

 

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  1. That’s fantastic!

    Posted by kimberly

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

What’s been going on here

November 26th, 2012

We’ve been staffed sparsely for the past week so people could have some time off for the Thanksgiving holiday. I hope everyone had a wonderful few days with family, friends, pets, or alone. With not many keepers around, there’s been little time to sit and update you on life here. With that said, here are a few photos to share about some of the things that have been going on here:

I’ve been training Jessi to handle Phoebe, our education alligator.

Jennifer Armstrong (who helped smash up pumpkins during Pumpkin Fest 2012) checked out the trees over the fish stream and waterfall in Carolina Wildlife. We’re making a plan to clean them and add more.

 

I had a really bad splinter in my left thumb. I’m a lefty, and could not dig it out. Jennifer and Marilyn tried, but they were unsuccessful. After a few days, Annie was able to get it out for me –  it was about 4 mm long and I was relieved to have it out.

Annie gets out my splinter

I’ve been preparing for an emergency drill –  this one will focus on a bear escape/recapture. Kristen found this bear and donated it to the training cause. Big Big Bear lives at my house. ( I have another bear named Big Bear and this bear is bigger than the other, hence the name Big Big Bear)

Big Big Bear. I bring her in for drills.

And finally, a little quiz for you. Below is the picture I took when we released our new male red wolf, 1414, into the wolf exhibit. How many of the people below can you name?

 

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  1. (Left to right) Aaron, Marilyn, Kent, Jessi, Sarah, Jill, and Katy. I’m just unsure about the three at the fence.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. Director Comment :

    that’s ’cause the three at the fence were volunteer Max, and Vet Tech Anna and her husband. Well done Ro- thanks for playing.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  3. Last time I helped with bear escape training, Kent wanted to use the tranquilizer on me…best training ever..

    Posted by Mike Fink
  4. very nice post, i surely enjoy this wonderful site, persist in it

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Pet worms

August 2nd, 2011

We order Superworms to feed to our critters. That’s right, the are called “Superworms”.  They are big, and they are not really worms, but rather a larval stage of a beetle.

A bill came in last week, and instead of saying “superworms” it said “PET” mealworms. Volunteer Annie specifically does not spend anytime with the superworms as she gets attached and has even named them. She’ll be amused to see that someone else thinks of them as “pets” too.

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  1. I can’t think of a less desirable pet.

    Posted by Erin Brown
  2. Director Comment :

    That’s harsh Erin. There’s got to be something less desirable than a super worm. A nematode? A tick? (although Jill i s raising an incredible mother tick in a jar, so maybe not a tick).

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

heART health month

February 15th, 2011

February is Heart Health Month.   This art work was hand delivered for our opossums:

Annie is hanging it up for our opossums to see.

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  1. They’re welcome to join us at the potluck tomorrow if they want!

    Posted by Leslie
  2. I noticed its on Jessica’s cage when really I think Sonny needs to pay attention to it more….

    Posted by Courtney
  3. Director Comment :

    That’s a bit rough Courtney. Sonny is a bit sensative about his weight and we are taking more subtle approaches with him. :)

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Red Wolf update- 1227 is feisty and strong

September 18th, 2010

I emailed my friend and Red Wolf Contact at the NC  Zoo to see how female red wolf 1227 was doing.  I drove her there on September 8th. (I was kept company on my drive by Volunteer Annie). Below is the email I received from Chris yesterday:

She sure is feisty.  She went about 48 hours without eating but now she is eating well and appears to be gaining weight.  We did a quarantine exam on her and she was the same weight as what was written in her record but that was over a week ago now.  We where able to do an ultrasound of her repo track during her exam and everything appears good and healthy with the limited amount we can see with ultrasound.  Her blood work all came back WNL.

Did I mention that she is feisty?  She fought me the entire time I was restraining her for the exam.  We had to anesthetize her to complete the exam.  I kept trying to tell her that she is only 40 pounds and I am 230 pounds and she could not win but for some reason that logic did not work on her.

Overall she is doing great and we can’t wait to get her out of that room and into her new off exhibit pen with the 3 year old male.

So, all is well with 1227 and the bonus for me is knowing that Chris gets a little payback. About 10 years ago I picked up female red wolf 918 from the zoo. As soon as Chris locked the door on the crate he started to mischievously laugh. He then enlightened me to all the issues the wolf had at the zoo, laughed again, and said good luck.  Female 918 never gave us any trouble, and even had pups here with male 953. I hope Chris has the same good fortune with 1227!

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by , Keeper
I started volunteering at the museum when I was 13 (I'm 22, and they pay me now, which is nice). Favorite work activities include, but are not limited to: bathing our steer, talking about bears, playing guitar (sometimes for the animals) and riding my bike around grounds. And blogging, of course.
I work Tues-Sat and can be tweeched @ernbrn.

Report of an Incident

July 16th, 2009

As I’m sure is the case with most work places, when anything occurs at the Museum that could be refered to as an “incident”, we write an incident report. An incident report is just a summary of what happened, to whom, and when. It’s quite straightforward really, but as you might imagine, the incident reports that come out of the animal department can be pretty goofy. Below is a slightly edited version of the incident report I turned into Sherry when I got stung on the eyelid by what I’m guessing is a wasp. Enjoy!

It was Bastille day, and in honor of the holiday (viva la France!), I was piping classical music throughout the farmyard (it was a special Bastille day program: French composers. This also doubled as the animal’s weekly culture/history lesson). Sir Boles (known to the common man as Larry) joined me in celebrating France’s rise as a modern nation by scooping poops avec moi. After a brief hiatus while Barnes supply was being dealt with, I returned to my scooping/holiday observing activities. I had just finished scooping the sheep yard, and my thoughts were of the day: how the morning felt like early fall does, and how it was transporting me back in time to last fall, how interesting how summer and fall have such different emotional feelings, how summer is lovely and long but so stealthily draining, but the breeze through the farmyard was refreshing and made me feel alive again when I hadn’t even known that it was missing. I was thinking this as I was rounding the corner to go back into the goat barn, when suddenly something flew into my eyeball. Reacting in what was most assuredly a comical fashion, I propelled my sunglasses from my face with both hands while jumping back and making a sound that I cannot remember exactly, but most likely sounded something close to, “Ennnhhhh! Ennnhhh!”. I then stopped my frantic waving, swatting, and exclamations and waited for the brief sting of something flying into your eyeball to go away. When it didn’t go away after I was most confident that the foreign insect had exited my ocular area, and when the pain in fact proceeded to intensify, I finally realized the horrifying truth: I had been stung on my eye. This was around 10am. I immediately covered my poor, innocently attacked eye, which was at that point tearing up, and ran with much haste down to the building. Outside the Animal Department I discovered a small congregation of keepers and volunteers, one of whom was Annie. She was the first I told, knowing that I could get the most sympathy, help, coffee cake, and worried motherly affection from her. She, of course, did not disappoint, and followed me into the bathroom where I inspected my poor, poor eyelid, where a tiny red dot was visible mere millimeters from my eyelashes, implying that if my reflexes did not mirror those of a tiger as much as they do, I would have been stung right on the eyeball. I was taken into the vet room where a larger congregation of people were congregating, including Dr. V, one of the vets who was in for vet rounds. She immediately used her veterinarian skillz to assess my eyelid and used her motherly skillz to comfort me and make me feel much self pity for my poor, poor eye (which, at that point, was starting to hurt very badly.) A bag of frozen popcorn kernels was fetched, orders for benadryl and water were barked, and my pulse was checked old-school style several times by Annie, using only my wrist and her watch. A bottle of frozen water shortly replaced the popcorn kernels, and I was seated in a rolling chair, and assigned as the charge of Annie while she finished cleaning. I was placed strategically in the hallway, where many a person passed by and had the chance to be simultaneously appalled by and sympathetic to my condition. At it’s most impressive point, my eye was swollen almost completely shut. I was a patient patient, and after about an hour, the swelling had gone down, and most of the sleepy feeling from the benadryl had dissipated, so I was sent home. 14 hours later, the swelling was gone, but a tender, slightly stinging feeling remained to remind me both that I’m lucky to be sitting here today with both of my eyeballs, and also of my own mortality. To the bee who stung me while I was minding my own business thinking only lovely thoughts, I have only one word: karma.

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  1. Kinda reminds me of a book I read in the seventies, "Bee Here Now"

    Posted by Wendy A

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Spotlight: Volunteer Annie

March 25th, 2008
Annie has been an outstanding volunteer for many years now, about 8 years! 2-3 days each week she comes and passionately takes care of our education animals. She has incredible observation skills noticing the slightest of changes in behaviors which is critical in preventative health care for our animals: her ability to spot small changes in behavior as she works with the animals has helped us to provide excellent medical care.

Even when Annie is not here, she’s working for us. She spends her nights awake thinking of new toys or cage designs, or worrying about an animal who was acting unusual that day. You won’t find a more committed and dependable volunteer than Annie. She also helps to train other new volunteers. Since she is so detail oriented, and has her own funny language she uses with the animals, you can always tell a volunteer who was “Annie trained” by the words they say and how completely they know the job!

Annie helps with a lot of special projects too. Below, you can see her (with Joe) helping with our bear tree trimming project. She is also incredibly caring about the Keepers, bringing in snacks and chocolate, and remembering everyone’s birthday.
As with all the others who make up our team, Annie plays a vital role, and we are very fortunate to have her!

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  1. Hurrah for Annie and her mashed potatoes!

    Posted by Jill
  2. Excellent post, you hit all the awesome things about Annie on the head. We love you, Annie!

    Posted by Erin Brown
  3. Snackies, more snackies!!!!

    Posted by Larry

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