Posts Tagged ‘bearded dragon’

by , Keeper
I started out as a volunteer in February 2013 and became a full fledged keeper in October 2013. I love birds, mainly raptors. When I'm not working I like to read and play tennis. I have two dogs and two cats.
I work Tuesday through Saturday mostly out in Explore the Wild. You might be able to see me at the Meet the Keeper program at 2:00pm or training the Lemurs!

QuickPic: Ramsey

July 27th, 2014

Ramsey, our newest bearded dragon, has quite the personality. She is very active and we tend to find her in strange positions. This is her in her outdoor sunning cage!

Ramsey in her sunning cage!

Ramsey in her sunning cage!

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPic: Caption needed.

April 18th, 2014

HELP- CAPTION NEEDED:

2014 Apr 18 Ramsey Goes Outside (7)

Join the conversation:

  1. Look into my eyes, you’re getting sleepy…

    Where’s your harness???

    This harness is weighing me down…

    Posted by HRvdB
  2. “Come around here often?”

    Posted by Jill
  3. “Let’s be sexy together!”

    Posted by Katy
  4. So…You’re new in town?

    Posted by Krista
  5. No caption needed. The look on Jill’s face says it all!

    Posted by Ranger Greg
  6. “When I look into your eyes I forget that I am cold-blooded, cause baby you make my blood boil”

    Posted by Ranger Ro

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Huge thanks to VSH: Veterinary Specialty Hospital.

February 7th, 2014

In addition to last week’s snow, we took four animal over to VSH in Durham. The Veterinary Specialty Hospital along with Dr. Cindy Godshalk of East Coast Veterinary Imaging donated their facility, services, and staff to ultrasound and radiograph four of our animals. AND, this isn’t the first time they’ve stepped up and helped out:

Dr. Godshalk at work

The first time was 3.5 years ago when Cassandra needed an ultrasound. Last year we brought two snakes to VSH in Cary for ultrasounds with Dr. Godshalk. And in 2102, Dr. Godshalk and her crew came on grounds to ultrasound the female wolf.

Katy packed everyone up along with our supplies. Can you guess which carrier has which animal?

Last week a pine snake (Megatron), a ferret (Dixie), a bearded dragon (Jr.) and a red ruffed lemur (Iris) all needed tests: ultrasounds and radiographs. Dr. Vanderford arranged with VSH and Dr. Godshalk to bring our critters in on Monday.

Jen, one of the Vet Techs, was helping us left and right and with this and that and everything else. We were really fortunate that she, and everyone else, was excited to have the slithery and scaly and furry exotic critters we brought with us.

Jen logs each of the animals and the procedures needed into the system.

Megatron is over 7 feet long.

 

Megatron, one of our adult male pine snakes, needed radiographs. (He is the father of the pine snakes that hatched in July 2012). He has a section of his body that doesn’t really bend, so we wanted to get “x-rays” to check things out. The pictures showed some calcification on the spine. We don’t know why this happens, but we’ve seen it before in other snakes. We’ll be really careful when handling him and let him get exercise on flat surfaces.

staff at VSH checking out Megatron’s films.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Vanderford helps Dixie pose for the shot.

Dixie, one of our four ferrets needed an ultrasound. We wanted to see if she had insulinoma. An insulinoma is a tumor on the pancreas. This is a very common ferret disease. Dixie had to be shaved for the ultrasound. We tried to hold her still but were unsuccessful so we had to use anesthesia to sedate her for the ultrasound. It doesn’t look like Dixie has an insulinoma, however we need to review the ultrasounds and determine next steps in case there are other issues to move on.

Dixie with her shaved abdomen being “gassed” down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Iris, a 22-year-old red ruffed lemur was next. Katy saw some concerning cells in a urine test she had run- cells that could be indicative of cancer. Good timing that Katy found this out a few days before our visit to VSH so Iris came along  to be checked out.

Dr. Godshalk working with Iris.

 

We were thinking there might be bladder cancer, or a cancer of the reproductive organs, but that wasn’t found. That’s good news for sure. I cannot tell anything when I look at the ultrasound pictures, but we’ll be reviewing what was learned and determining what steps are next. (Dr. Godshalk is a board certified radiologist so it doesn’t matter that I cannot recognize anything- she takes care of all that!)

small print outs, about 4×4 inches of the different views.

Jen and Dr. Godshalk get photos of Jr.

Junior was the last patient. She’s a bearded dragon. A few weeks ago her beard was quite swollen and Jr. wasn’t eating well. Dr. Vanderford and Katy sedated her at the Museum and pulled about 8 cc of fluid from her beard. While she has improved, we wanted to further assess and try to determine the cause of her issues.

 

Maybe the ultrasound want felt like a message to junior?

 

Junior was possibly the easiest of the four animals to work with. She didn’t need to get shaved (no fur on reptiles). She didn’t need to get sedated- she just held still without any wiggling or struggling. She made it really easy.

 

 

 

4 DVMs consulting on Junior’s case: Vanderford, Godshalk, Eward, and Eward.

Jen get’s Junior in the perfect position to get the needed radiograph.

After Junior finished with the ultrasound, she went in for radiographs. Jen was able to get great films, and she even got Junior to hold still on her side! While the ultrasound didn’t show any smoking gun, an unrelated finding on the radiographs shows some real issues with Junior’s vertebrae.

Dr. Godshalk reviews Junior’s films

Thanks so much to VSH!!  The generosity and help of all the staff their have been wonderful. We are very fortunate to have them help us care for our animal population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Godzilla

October 24th, 2013

There have been many instances where the keepers go through difficult times. Unfortunately, we experienced the loss of our education bearded dragon, Godzilla.

Godzilla was with us for a long time. When he first came, I would tend to have him resting on me when I sat in the office where he chilled and just looked around.

We noticed Godzilla not acting his usual self and his appetite declined. He was taken off program usage and allowed to get rest and the vet care he needed. Godzilla never made a recovery and the best thing to do was euthanize him.

I felt very sad, but I knew Godzilla had  great care at the museum and he was a popular program animal.

 

 

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Nap time

May 17th, 2013

Godzilla, one of our bearded dragons, is famous for napping in random positions.

Check out this previous post about his strange napping habits.

This particular sleeping position was excitedly pointed out to me by one of our latest interns Jamie.

Check him out:

 

Godzilla has no issues getting comfortable

 

 

 

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  1. AHH I love this picture of Godzilla, definitely one of my favorite! He just looks so relaxed.

    Posted by Jamie Gray

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Zzzzzz…

December 23rd, 2011

I just had to share these silly pictures of the Red Ruffed Lemurs SLEEPING hard!

 

 

Moments like these are what makes this job so amazing- animals never cease to amaze you!

Check out Godzilla our bearded dragon sleeping- Picture

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  1. Keeper Comment :

    Look at those cuties!! Awwwww… sometimes they frustrate me to no end during training, but I still love those girls!:)

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson
  2. That’s just REALLY funny:)

    Posted by Ashlyn

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by , Keeper
I am most famous here in the animal department for "expanding" the barred owl exhibit, clogging the wolf pool, and splitting my pants. My other less notorious work, since 2003, includes keeping, purchasing our animal supplies, coordinating our volunteers, and managing our animal enrichment program.
Find me training the lemurs or in other various animal enclosures Monday through Friday, or at the grocery store on Wednesdays, when I shop for produce!

Worm on a string

February 11th, 2011

Were I a bearded dragon, my chin would not be turning black with anger/ excitement but instead, red with embarrassment.

You see, a couple of weeks ago, we determined that we needed to be extra vigilant about making sure Godzilla was getting enough exercise.  We have been a little worried about his back legs and keeping them in good, active shape. He is an animal that by nature tends to sit and bask a lot, and by upbringing sits around even more (he came to us as a hand fed pet who saw no need to move to his food).  So we wanted to make sure he just isn’t sitting around 24/ 7 and Katy was assigned the task of experimenting with different ways to exercise him.

At first, she did all the sensible things :  offering him different basking spots and bathing opportunities in a larger environment, putting his Monday/ Thursday diet of crickets into a larger space for him to chase after (versus de-legged and in a bowl), and allowing him time in a bigger and more topographical cage.

Some ideas resulted in a little more movement and exercise, but Katy was not quite satisfied. And so began her experiment of tying a superworm onto a string and dragging it around like bait for Godzilla to chase after. When she ran this idea by Kent and I, we politely expressed our doubt.  And by “politely”, I mean  knee-slapping, guffawing laughter at the ridiculousness of the idea.  I mean, running to other keepers and declaring loudly, “Ha! Guess what Katy’s trying to do!”.  I mean, asking Katy to tell us when she was finished, so we could advise visitors  to go to the farmyard and watch Auggie and Miss Piggy lift off and zoom around through the treetops.

Well, don’t you know the darn worm on a string thing worked?  And so, red faced and ashamedly, I offer up my sincere apologies to the genius, the brilliance and the undaunted imagination of one Keeper Katy.

Enjoy the video.  YouTube Preview Image

Join the conversation:

  1. awesome! successful lizard exercise! May I ask how long it took to tie the string around the worm?

    Posted by Allison
  2. The video is great! Maybe you should invest in a treadmill and suspend the worm from the front of it so you wouldn’t have to worry about running out of space?

    Posted by Leslie
  3. Keeper Comment :

    Hey Allison,
    Katy says it took less than 3 seconds to tie on the string. I’d add that for the average person however, who doesn’t possess beardy exercise superpowers, it may take longer. :)

    Posted by Kristen Pormann
  4. awesome! now- what if you make a strap on his back with a stick poking out front so it always dangles in front of him? Carrot on a stick style?

    Posted by Courtney

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: X-rays

January 23rd, 2011

Recently, some of our animals went to the vet for radiographs, or x-rays.  Godzilla, our Bearded Dragon, has been having issues with his back legs, and one of our corn snakes is have some fusing issues of her spine. I’ve attached links at the end to previous posts where you can see x-rays of other animals.

Godzilla

corn snake

Do you remember x-rays or scans we’ve shared of other animals?

Yona’s rads.

Yona’s CT scan.

Cassandra’s x-rays.

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by , Volunteer
I like volunteering to work with the animals and the Keepers (both are quite exciting and entertaining). I speak several languages including chicken. In another life I teach physics, but mostly I just love to learn (anything!) and be outdoors. When not volunteering I like to watch the bears and photograph around Explore the Wild. Follow me on Twitter @ktraphagen

Video View: Godzilla Eating!

November 29th, 2010

Our Godzilla is not a B-rated moviestar monster, no, he’s a superstar in our off-exhibit reptile room. Today was “Herp Feed” day (when we feed the turtles, lizards, salamanders, gecko, and alligators). Yum!! Here’s Godzilla, our bearded dragon, chowing down his crickets (which were lovingly de-legged for him by Keeper Kimberly). I was merely the bearer and server of the bounty.

YouTube Preview Image

Join the conversation:

  1. Why are the legs of the crickets removed?

    Posted by Laura
  2. Director Comment :

    Good question Laura. The large jumping legs are removed because they hold little nutritional value and they have small yet sharp pokey-parts. Also, if the crickets had their jumping legs they would leave the dish!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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