Posts Tagged ‘black bears’

by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Bear Photos

September 26th, 2013

All 4 Black Bears

Gus

Gus

Yona

 

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

A Keeper’s Point of View, Part 2

June 28th, 2013

I wrote about the beginning of my day in my last post. It showed my point of view as Gus was waking up from a night of sleeping on the cliff. This series of pictures was taken on the same day. After checking the bear fence, I checked the lemurs and the wolves. By the time I got to the bear house he had climbed down the cliff and was making his way over to the bear house. I am standing inside the bear house as he approaches the doors to the house.

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

QuikPic: Virginia Bear

June 7th, 2013

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  1. Soooo….cute!!!

    Posted by dj
  2. Very cute picture of this Virginia bear. Is it common for bears to have this strip of white hair?

    Posted by Corey Smith
  3. Corey,
    Bears coats can vary quite alot. Virginia happens to have a perfect V, Mimi has two stripes on her chest that don’t connect and Yona has just a little white patch. Gus doesn’t have any white on his chest. The color of their coats can vary a great deal.
    Check out this post about their various color shades
    http://blogs.lifeandscience.org/keepers/2011/07/23/black-bears/

    Posted by kimberly
  4. Hello,

    I will be moving to the Durham area in August 2013 and I am interested in volunteering with the animals at the museum. I am 2012 UNC alumna who is working towards applying to vet school. I have thousands of veterinarian hours, hundreds of hours caring for giant tortoises, and 5 hours performing a whale necropsy.

    Please keep me informed as to when I would be able to volunteer.

    Thank you.

    My phone number, for quicker access, is 252-767-6632.

    Posted by Samantha Gordon
  5. Hi Samantha
    You can go to this site for more information on volunteering for the museum.
    http://lifeandscience.org/get-involved/volunteer

    Posted by Kimberly

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Black Bear Paws

April 27th, 2013

Black Bear paws are used for many things:

Walking

Rooting around looking for food

Scratching

Marking trees

Climbing trees

Swimming

And as plates

Virginia using her paw as a plate for her nut shells

This last use is one of my favorites and all of our bears do this. Sometimes they will place a piece of food on their paw and raise their paw up to their mouth. So cute and functional.

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

This week in ETW

October 13th, 2012

Recently I added a hammock to the Ring Tailed Lemur indoor stalls. I have seen both Cassandra and Satyrus snuggled up together in it but when I reached for my camera they jumped up. I got lucky the other day and snapped a pic of Lycus lounging in it.

I was working for Keeper Jill this past Saturday (who was attending the AAZK conference) and wanted do some fun enrichment for the Bears and for me to watch. So I used a bunch of empty boxes and filled them with their p.m. food and some extra treats. It wasn’t very eventful but it was interesting to see how each of them accessed their boxes differently. Gus just shoved his head right in! Mimi carefully pulled back the tabs on the boxes. Virginia pushed all the tabs into the box and Yona had her box on it’s side. 

Front to back: Gus, Mimi, Yona

Virginia

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

You won’t see this in the wild

August 17th, 2012

Breakfast time!

 
I snapped this picture of our 4 black bears eating breakfast together. Gus is the one looking up.
 
In the wild, black bears are solitary. This is definately a rare sight.
 
Our black bears are all rescues who weren’t able to be released back into the wild. Luckily we have a large enough exhibit for them that they are all able to have their own space. Sometimes they actually like spending time together. Often Gus and Yona can be seen sleeping close by and in the winter we’ve even see Mimi spooning Gus in the cave.

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

What do the bears eat?

July 5th, 2012
Bear food for one day

Here is the Bear food for one day.

12 apples
6 oranges
12 carrots
6 pears
6 cups of nuts
12.5 lbs of chow (missing from pic)
 
The bears always get apples and oranges. Every other day they get either carrots or cooked sweet potatoes. Their extra fruit/vegetable  (which is pears in this pic) varies each day between pears, avacados, berries, peaches or plums, heads of lettuce, grapes or raisins, and corn on the cob. Each season the amount of food the bears need changes. We monitor this by checking the yard once a week- seeing how much food is leftover and also by watching for any arguments between the bears at feeding time.
 
Plus our bears get  food enrichment:  including 1/2 buckets of brazil nuts, layered ice blocks, and frozen watermelon.
 

Layered ice block enrichment

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

ANSWERS- Black Bear: True or False

May 23rd, 2012

1. When a bear stands up it is going to charge.

false- Bears are very curious and are often just checking out the situation

2. All black bears are black.

false- Check out Keeper Jill’s post on the different colors black bears can be- here

3. A bear’s sense of smell is better than a dog’s.

true- Bears sense of smell is 7 times greater than a bloodhound’s

4. Bears can’t climb trees.

false- Black bears are amazing climbers, getting out onto very small limbs wtihout issues

5. A bear can run faster than you.

true- Much faster! Black bears can run up to 35mph

6. When hiking in bear country it is good to make noise.

true- Check out my post on Bear Fear- here

7. Black bears are normally vicious and aggressive.

false- They are actually quite timid and will typically run away

8. During hibernation, a bear does not eat, drink, defecate or urinate.

true- Although they do not truely hibernate, they will wake up if disturbed!

9. A newborn cub is about the size of a newborn human.

false- At birth black bears weigh about 9 oz but grow quickly

10. Bears mate for life.

false- Black Bears are solitary except during the mating season, males will copulate with as many females as possible

11. Bears always make dens in caves.

false- They can den in hollow trees, rock crevices, the crown of downed trees, brush piles, as well as caves

12. Bears, like dogs and cats, have 4 toes on each foot.

false- Bears have 5 toes on their front and back feet

13. People should never feed bears.

true- Very true, black bears have good memories and will come back for good food. It’s the human causing the problem, not the bear

14. Bear cubs do not make good pets.

true- Bear cubs are unruley, difficult to manage, and grow very fast. They are terrible pets!

15. Bears eat lots of meat.

false- Black Bears are omnivores. They eat lots of plants, berries, grasses, as well as some carrion and small animals. Depending on the area they live in.

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Black Bears: True or False

May 21st, 2012

Thanks to the Appalachian Bear Rescue website I found this true or false quiz. See if you can answer them correctly- I’ll post the answers soon.

The Appalachian Bear Rescue Mission Statement is:

(a) to rehabilitate orphaned and injured bears for release to the wild;

(b) to educate the public about black bears and the regional threats facing them; and

(c) to research bear attributes which may help solve other environmental or health-related issues

Virginia Bear 2011

 

1. When a bear stands up it is going to charge.

2. All black bears are black.

3. A bear’s sense of smell is better than a dog’s.

4. Bears can’t climb trees.

5. A bear can run faster than you.

6. When hiking in bear country it is good to make noise.

7. Black bears are normally vicious and aggressive.

8. During hibernation, a bear does not eat, drink, defecate or urinate.

9. A newborn cub is about the size of a newborn human.

10. Bears mate for life.

11. Bears always make dens in caves.

12. Bears, like dogs and cats, have 4 toes on each foot.

13. People should never feed bears.

14. Bear cubs do not make good pets.

15. Bears eat lots of meat.

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  1. 1. False
    2. False
    3. True
    4. False
    5. True
    6. True
    7. FALSE
    8. False (trick question?)
    9. Tough one. False?
    10. False
    11. False
    12. False
    13. True
    14. True
    15. False

    Posted by leslie
  2. Director Comment :

    I agree with Leslie, although not with the same emotion, and except on #8 (if a bear is hibernating than they don’t do those things).
    Also, I think “A” is the answer to the first question

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

QuikPost: Bear Enrichment

May 10th, 2012

I had to make peanut butter pinecones for the Bear’s enrichment the other day and tried something a little different. I rolled the peanut butter pinecones in shredded carrots, added just a few raisins and drizzled with a little honey. Gus Bear loved them! The grass was too high that day for me to get a good picture of him eating them though.

Bear Enrichment

Join the conversation:

  1. It’s like carrot cake but with pine cones!

    Posted by leslie
  2. Let me know the next time you give these to the bears. I’d love to come down and watch!

    Posted by Shawntel
  3. Keeper Comment :

    The next time the bears are scheduled to get peanut butter pine cones is Wed the 23rd. I’m off that day but I believe Aaron will be working in ETW- give him a radio call in the a.m.

    Posted by Kimberly Lawson
  4. Today January 15, 2011 marks 12 years since the cancellation of the spirng bear hunt in Ontario. A landmark decision regarding ethics in hunting. People who like to shoot bears still get 3 months a year to do it. Bears cannot be shot in their dens legally. A few juristictions are looking to change their laws regarding shooting bears in dens and shooting bears in spirng when cubs are very small. More should!

    Posted by Jose

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