Posts Tagged ‘Cynthia’

by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Birthday Celebration

March 30th, 2014

Cynthia, who is our oldest Red Ruffed Lemur, turned 33 years old on March 30th.  This makes Cynthia the oldest Red Ruffed Lemur in the country.  33 years is old for any lemur considering the average lifespan in captivity is early twenties.  In the wild, lemurs tend to live longer to around mid-twenties.  Since lemurs are endemic to Madagascar, it can be difficult to replicate their dietary and habitat needs in a captive environment.  The keepers felt that 33 years of life for a lemur would be a great reason to celebrate.  On Thursday the 27th, we provided the Red Ruffed Lemurs with a variety of different enrichment items.  They received puzzle feeders, skewers, streamers, and colorful bags with dried fruit.  At the 2pm lemur program, guest sang “Happy Birthday” from Lemur viewing  and keepers talked about Cynthia as well as general information on lemurs.

If you were unable to make it to the Birthday celebration, here are some pictures of the big day….

Decorations in inside viewing at Lemurs.

Decorations in inside viewing which are the enrichment items for not just Cynthia but Jethys and Iris too.

Cynthia checking out what is in the colorful bag.

Cynthia checking out what is in the colorful bag.

 

Cynthia smelling the streamers.

Cynthia smelling the streamers.

 

Cynthia, Jethys and Iris all checking out the enrichment items.

Cynthia, Jethys and Iris all checking out the enrichment items.

 

 

Birthday Cakes

Birthday Cakes

 

Getting more enrichment items for the 2pm program.  This is fruit skewered on paper towel tubes.

Getting more enrichment items for the 2pm program. This is fruit skewered on paper towel tubes.

 

Autumn and I getting a larger paper towel tube ready with mango, kiwi and dried cherries.

Autumn and I getting a larger paper towel tube ready with mango, kiwi and dried cherries.

 

Cynthia going to a puzzle feeder that had a variety of fruit and veggies inside it.

Cynthia going to a puzzle feeder that had a variety of fruit and veggies inside it.

 

Jethys eating one of the birthday cakes.

Jethys eating one of the birthday cakes.

 

Cynthia and the skewered fruit paper towel tube.  Iris is looking in one of the puzzle feeders.

Cynthia and the skewered fruit paper towel tube. Iris is looking in one of the puzzle feeders.

 

The keepers and guest had a great time watching the Red Ruffed Lemurs explore and manipulate their enrichment items.  After it was all over, they all found their spots on the perching and rested.

Time to rest.

Time to rest.

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Upcoming Birthday Celebration!

March 23rd, 2014

Cynthia, our oldest Red Ruffed Lemur, will be turning 33 years old on March 30th.  On March 27th, the Explore the Wild team (Autumn and myself) will be providing Cynthia and the other Red Ruffed Lemurs with different types of enrichment and food items so that we can celebrate this milestone.  This will provide the Red Ruffed Lemurs with great opportunities to interact with different food items and enrichment plus give the keepers a chance to take a lot of pictures!  So, this will be very enriching to the keepers.

 

My next post will show what we did for Cynthia on her big day plus how she and the other Red Ruffed Lemurs interacted with all the items.

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Director Comment :

    We’ve already had a couple bags of fruit and other goodies dropped off. Thanks Neighbor:

    http://blogs.lifeandscience.org/keepers/2013/03/24/spotlight-my-anonymous-neighbor/

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  2. Congratulations to Cynthia for being one of the oldest Red-ruffed lemurs in captivity in the world – You go girl!!! Get your party on!!!

    Posted by Katy

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Last week’s vet visit

October 7th, 2013

Dr. Vanderford was here last week for a visit to check on some of the critters. We had two sedations planned for the day: Henry and Cynthia.

Dr. V getting meds ready

 

Cynthia needed a couple bad teeth removed. She did great under sedation- staying asleep when we wanted and waking when we wanted.

Cynthia awaking in her crate.

 

Henry, on the other hand, was a different story. First of all, it’s difficult to hold him- at least it is not safe to hold him as you never know when he will turn on you. So in order to sedate him, we place him in a box and pump anesthesia in.

Henry getting sleepy

 

Henry sleepy

We’re not sure exactly why, but sedation doesn’t seem to work on Henry like it should on paper. We upped his meds this year and still, he was never fully sedated. This made a complete physical a bit tricky. Next year we’ll have to try new drugs on him.

Both critters are fine. Next week the wolves will have their physicals. Katy is aching to get her hands on the male so it should be an exciting day.

 

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Lemur Training Update

March 7th, 2013

 

The red ruffed lemurs have been off exhibit since December. We have just a couple of weeks left until it is warm enough for the ring tailed lemurs to be outside during the day and the red ruffed lemurs to move upstairs, on exhibit. Here is where we were last time I updated about training- click here.

While our focus was going to be crate training we also added the behavior of station. Station is a way to 1) separate the lemurs if necessary 2) keep a lemur in one spot while working with the others.  The red ruffed have access to three stalls. In each stall we have a shelf attached to the door. These shelves are where we would like the lemurs to ‘station’. But how do they know which one of them should station on which shelf? Great questions- we hang up symbols on the doors, above the shelves. Each lemur has their own specific symbol. Stationing is going great!

Crate training is also going well. The door has been shut on Cynthia and we’re very close to shutting the door on Jethys and Iris.

The ring tailed lemurs are still doing great with their crate training. Dr English will visit in the next few months and our oldest lemurs Lycus (almost 28) and Cynthia (almost 32) will have to be crated and brought to the building to get their eyes checked out.

 

Jethys symbol for station is a star

Iris’ symbol for station is a moon

Cynthia symbol for station is a diamond

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Photos from Explore the Wild

September 24th, 2012

Lemurs-

Cynthia sleeping- can you believe she finds this position comfortable???

Cassandra having a bite to eat

Lycus sitting between the shift door

The beginning of station stump training

Ring Tail!

 

 Bears-  

Two bears during a keeper talk. Keeper Talks are in Explore the Wild everyday at 2pm!

Gus laid out on a hot day, Yona is curled up close by

I love seeing Mimi’s cute face each morning

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Popsicles

December 19th, 2011

 

We are always on the look out for new and exciting enrichment.  Keeper Marilyn and I are both lemur trainers and work together in Explore the Wild on Wednesdays, so we came up with the idea to make some sort of popsicle for the lemurs. We wanted them to be able to hold the popsicle for the themselves while they ate it. So we froze juice and added green beans, celery, and carrots as the sticks. It didn’t work out quite as we planned but the lemurs still enjoyed them. Lead Keeper Aaron is going to order us actual popsicle sticks – maybe they will be more supportive for next time.

 

Here is Cynthia trying her popsicle

 

Cassandra trying a popsicle

Join the conversation:

  1. Don’t order. I have some at home

    Posted by jill
  2. Keeper Comment :

    he already got them

    Posted by Kimberly Lawson

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Happy Birthday!

March 31st, 2011

Normally, we do not post blogs for an animals birthday, there would be way too many entries and too many cakes to bake. However, this month is special for one of our Red Ruffed lemurs,Cynthia. This promsimian turns the big 3-0! That’s right, 30 years old! Another primate turning 30 around here is Keeper Kim. Normal lifespan for a lemur in captivity is early 20s.  Another older lemur we have is Lycus, who was born in 1985.

We have other animals which are older but we cant prove it because we do not have the birth records, we have an arrival date but not a birth date. Misha, the red tailed hawk arrived in 1993, we know he was at least 2 years old because he had lost his juvenile feathers. Two of our barred owls arrived in 1989 and were adults as well.These birds can live into their 30s. When it comes to snakes, we have a rattle snake that arrived in 1990 at the age of 8. We cant forget about our oldest bear  Ursula , who just turned 20 this year and some of the turtles we don’t even have an arrival date on.

Join the conversation:

  1. Happy belated Birthday, Cynthia!

    Posted by Åsa
  2. how do you no when your red ear turtle is a boy or girl

    Posted by marla
  3. Hey there Marla!
    Let me answer this one for Jill if that’s okay. Once your turtles are a few inches long, look at their front fingernails. If you have a male, the claws will be super long, like Wolverine from X-Men :) If you have a girl, they will be shorter and normal ratio length. The male uses his long claws to attract the females during the mating season when they are a little bit older.
    You can also tell a little by ther length of the tails, with males having a longer tail than the females, but this a little harder to tell by unless you’re used to looking at alot of turtles. :) The claw method is the easiest way.
    Good luck with it and have a good one!

    Posted by Mikey

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