Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Cannedy’

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

Max’s Medication

April 5th, 2014

A couple of weeks ago Max, the steer, wasn’t feeling very well. He had some loose stool, a runny nose and wasn’t as interested in his food as normal. We had Dr. Cannedy come out to look at him to find out what was wrong. Dr. Cannedy came out and gave Max some medication to help with his stool quality as well as medication to help with the other symptoms. One of the issues was Max had an intestinal parasite. In order to treat this parasite Dr. Cannedy gave us medication to give to Max for the next 4 days. We were to give Max 2 tablets crushed into his chow with a little molasses dribbled over it to cover up the taste. Max weighs 774.0 kg (1702.8 lbs.) so his medication is a lot larger than what many of our other animals would get. Below are pictures of Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 029

Max’s medication is on the Right – 2 of these tablets per day crushed into food. The medications on the Left are an Aspirin tablet, Cosequin capsule, Baytril tablet and a Papaya pill.

2014 Mar 13 032

Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 030

Side view of Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 033

Max taking his medication like a good boy!!!

Max took his medication very well. The molasses helped a great deal! Max was also given Gatorade water which he drinks very quickly! And now Max is doing much better and is almost completely back to his normal self!

Join the conversation:

  1. the photos, even with the ruler and coins, don’t do justice to just how big these pills were!

    Posted by sherry

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

A Veterinary Visit

March 3rd, 2013

This past Thursday our Farmyard veterinarians were here to check on the critters. Dr. Cannedy and Dr. Mozzachio arrived early on the chilly Thursday morning.  Full physicals will occur in April, but Lightning needed some blood taken to see how his Cushing’s disease is progressing. While here, our old goat Chummix got checked out and so were the pigs. Miss Piggy looks great according to Dr. Mozzachio, but she took photos so she could compare body condition in a month or so. Chummix had blood drawn as well as he continues to lose weight and his eating habits have become pickier and picker.

Dr. Cannedy, dressed for the chilly weather

 

 

Dr. Mozzachio photographing the pigs

 

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Retro’s Teeth Get a Visit

February 8th, 2013

A while ago, I posted about Lightning getting a visit from the dentist. A few weeks ago our alpaca Retro had to get her teeth looked at too. Her teeth needed to be floated so Dr. Cannedy came and went to work.

Retro has a large under bite, looks like I may need to get my teeth floated too!

A towel gets placed over her eyes to keep her calm and a speculum is put into her mouth so it stays open

He dremmels her teeth while I struggle to keep her still. I learned at this moment that alpacas were much stronger then I thought

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Too busy to write

September 16th, 2012

It’s been a crazy and busy week- too much going on to even sit and think. We’ve been paying extra attention to our newest members.  Last week about this time I was out at Our Ancestral Farm with Dr. Cannedy doing a herd check on the alpacas.

Hembras (females) waiting for their hands on check at Our Ancestral Farm

 

 

My head is still spinning from the week, but I’ll share (what I can remember) from the week:

  • Meetings, some multiple times, with 7 different contractors: 1) the fence company putting up new fencing in the Farmyard, 2) the handyman repairing barns, 3) the painters- the whole farmyard is being repainted, 4) the plumbers working on the sump pump down at bears 5) the tree service cutting down some dead trees around grounds, 6) electricians running the lines for the generator for our support hall, 7) our bear pool pump fabricators (we thought we had an issue/leak with the bear pool)
  • Extra scheduled and impromptu projects:  1) bear yard mowing, 2) wolf pool draining and dealing with faulty valve, 3)12 folks from Biogen Idec pruning and cleaning in the bear yard Friday morning, 4) Farmyard grading to prevent trip hazards from all the rain.
  • Dr. Vanderford has been around. We had lemur physicals (I am sure Kimberly will write about that when she has time) and Einstein opossum seems to have had a fall- he hurt his leg and broke some teeth.  He was off-site getting radiographs earlier and we were relieved that he did not break any bones, however, we think he hurt and even broke some teeth. We’re in process of scheduling him for follow up now.

    Dr. Vanderford waits for Einstein to be asleep before she checks on his teeth.

 

 

 

 

 

The most unexpected highlight of my week was coming home one night and finding 40 pounds of sweet potatoes on my doorstep. My neighbor is so kind! I mentioned the bears eat a lot of sweet potatoes this time of year, and two days later this box was waiting for me.  She’s always dropping off items: 3 watermelons were on my doorstep last week, 1 bag of canned pumpkin showed up a few months ago (for Chummix Goat medicine) as did watermelons all summer long.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week isn’t looking much calmer than last. Please think happy, good weather, good health thoughts our way!

Join the conversation:

  1. So cute!

    And thank you for the “goodbye sheep” post…we hadn’t realized that the sheep were leaving, and we were able to come say goodbye before they went!

    Posted by Libby

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

More alpaca photos

September 13th, 2012

The Alpacas received their pre-shipment physical on Sunday. Dr Cannedy and I, along with lots of vet school students, went to the Farm to check out the whole herd.

Dr. Cannedy has the coolest truck ever.

They arrived on grounds Monday morning in this trailer.

The trailer was so large and our access so narrow that we walked the girls to their pen the last 50 feet or so.

This is their quarantine pen and they will live here for about one month.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Gatorade for Goats

July 9th, 2012

Well, not for all goats, just Chummix. According to Dr. Cannedy Chummix is sick, with “old goat disease”. Chummix is watched closely, and has been for some time now. About six months or so ago Chummix lost a lot of weight. He was checked for all the typical diseases, and Dr. Cannedy has seen him three or four times since then. Chummix still eats and does his usual activities… he’s just old. Chummix is currently a shadow of what he used to be, and looks like an old goat.

Last week Chummix was sitting more, not being as rambunctious as usual, and wasn’t eating as he typically does. I think Sarah said he was being quite “cuddly”. Dr. Cannedy came by and still says Chimmix has “old goat disease”,  but gave him some vitamins and recommended the following treatment: Gatorade. 1 part Gatorade to 4 parts water. It’s been hot, super hot as we all know. We need to keep  Chummix hydrated and with balanced electrolytes too!

I bought 7 different flavors since I have no idea what flavor Chummix likes. Thoughts?

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. I think you gotta start with the classics-I find lemon-lime to be the most refreshing but orange is nice too. Do goats eat much citrus?

    Would you ever make him a gatorade popsicle?

    Posted by leslie
  2. Does Chummix like watermelons? You could inject some of the Gatorade in the watermelons for a super cool hydrating treat.

    Posted by dj
  3. Director Comment :

    he does indeed eat watermelon-sometimes, and other times not-so-much…

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  4. He drank a lot of FRUIT PUNCH flavor when I gave it to him.

    Posted by jebrown
  5. So far he really likes the fruit punch and grape flavors!!!

    Posted by Katy
  6. Keeper Comment :

    Jill wasn’t kidding about him drinking a lot of fruit punch. His water/gatorade bucket had about 2 gallons missing by the next morning!

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPic: Lightning and Max

November 27th, 2011

Sarah shared this photo with me of  Max and Lightning  (I love that Dr. Cannedy calls him Lightbulb).

Anyone want to share what they think the boys below are thinking?

 

Join the conversation:

  1. So Max, what do you think the humans, think we are thinking??

    Posted by Mike
  2. Looks like you interrupted them plotting a conspiracy of some kind.

    So sweet! I miss seeing them and can’t wait to introduce them to Scott!

    Posted by Leslie
  3. Lightning: “You distract her with those big brown eyes while I steal her radio.”

    He did, in fact, steal my radio and toss it into the duck yard just after I took this photo. As a general rule, I think that all of Lightning’s antics are premeditated. So clearly, he’s just trying to get Max involved this time.

    Posted by Sarah
  4. Lighting has tried several times to unionize the farm animals but has been out voted by the sheep..

    Posted by Mike

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Minor surgery for Chummix Goat

July 9th, 2010

Chummix Goat is fine- really. Keepers noticed a few weeks ago a mass under is armpit.  It didn’t drain like it was an abscess from one of his vaccines.  So, we scheduled an early morning time for Dr. Cannedy to come to remove the mass and send it off for testing so we can learn that everything is well with our big noisy goat.

Below are photos from this morning’s procedure.  Chummix is up and about and eating and acting as he usually does. The only thing  you might notice is his shaved arm pit.

Dr. Cannedy and his cool truck: vet-office-on-wheels

Sorry, I coudln't resist the butt shot photo. Chummix is behind there somewhere

Sleepy and being prepped for lump removal

The mass- the size of a large grape.

Join the conversation:

  1. Do you think the mass will grow back?

    Posted by Shawntel
  2. Director Comment :

    Good question Shawntel. We have to wait for the test results to tell us what the lump is/was. Once we know that, we’ll be able to gauge how likely it is to return.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Farmyard Physicals

April 7th, 2009

On Saturday Dr. Mozzachio and Dr. Cannedy came to the Museum for what we call the “farmyard physicals”. This happens every April and October. All the large mammals in the farmyard were checked out, given vaccines, had their hooves trimmed if needed, and their diets and enrichment were reviewed. Pig is hanging in a specially made pig-sling. Dr. Mozzachio, a pot-bellied pig specialist, took great care of him, cleaning around his eyes and giving him treats to keep him content while she worked. He delicately ate a piece of cereal from one of her hands while her other hand used “Q-tips” to clean around his eyes.

Below, Katy is holding one of our ewes while Dr. Cannedy and one of his veterinary students trim her hooves. Holding a sheep this way is an easy way to get them to hold still for a variety of procedures. The next photo shows Dr. Cannedy giving the sheep some dewormer using a piller. The pill goes in the long tube and then that goes into the sheep’s mouth, keeping human fingers safe from sheep teeth!


Somewhere under Erin and Katy is Lightning, our donkey. Dr. Cannedy is getting blood and giving vaccines. Lightning needed a bit of holding at first to calm down, but he eventually did.
Fecal samples were taken from every animal. Looking at poop through a microscope can tell us if an animal has certain parasites or mites. I think we have some photos of what we have some on the slides: look for a future post with those photos- it’s really cool what you can see through a microscope.

Join the conversation:

  1. Kristen said she would go into a sling for some peanut butter captain crunch, too!

    Posted by Marilyn

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