Posts Tagged ‘Dr. English’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Another visit from Dr. English

August 7th, 2013

Dr. English, a board certified veterinary ophthalmologist, was by last Thursday to check on a bunch of the animals with eye issues. He and his team saw 10 of our animals: 2 lemurs, the donkey, a rabbit, the hawk, 2 screech owls, 2 barred owls, and a salamander. We’re so thankful that Dr. English comes and checks on the animals who need his help. He tracks any changes in patients’ eyes from previous visits and checks out new animals who we have concerns about. We’ve also taken owls to him for surgery: all of which he graciously and generously donates.

Usually I post photos of the owls and Dr. English, but this year the best photos I took were of the largest and smallest patient:

Dr. English getting his fancy eye equipment in focus.I don’t know what any of his machines are called, but they are all really cool!

 

Lightning the donkey was the first patient. He did great!

 

Dr. Fisher who works with Dr. English checks out Baby, our spotted salamander.

So Baby, our spotted salamander, is typically teased by Dr. English for having a “stupid” name (she arrived over 15 years ago as a “baby”) and being “fat”. This year, similar to last year, Dr. English thought Baby’s eyes looked better and that she had trimmed down in weight. Below, everyone is laughing because I went to Baby’s health record and learned the past two years she had gained weight! (It must all be muscle).

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Lemur Training Update

March 7th, 2013

 

The red ruffed lemurs have been off exhibit since December. We have just a couple of weeks left until it is warm enough for the ring tailed lemurs to be outside during the day and the red ruffed lemurs to move upstairs, on exhibit. Here is where we were last time I updated about training- click here.

While our focus was going to be crate training we also added the behavior of station. Station is a way to 1) separate the lemurs if necessary 2) keep a lemur in one spot while working with the others.  The red ruffed have access to three stalls. In each stall we have a shelf attached to the door. These shelves are where we would like the lemurs to ‘station’. But how do they know which one of them should station on which shelf? Great questions- we hang up symbols on the doors, above the shelves. Each lemur has their own specific symbol. Stationing is going great!

Crate training is also going well. The door has been shut on Cynthia and we’re very close to shutting the door on Jethys and Iris.

The ring tailed lemurs are still doing great with their crate training. Dr English will visit in the next few months and our oldest lemurs Lycus (almost 28) and Cynthia (almost 32) will have to be crated and brought to the building to get their eyes checked out.

 

Jethys symbol for station is a star

Iris’ symbol for station is a moon

Cynthia symbol for station is a diamond

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Lemurs in Crates

August 11th, 2012

I’ve posted about lemur training before and wanted to give an update.

Click here and here to refresh your memory.

Ring Tailed Lemur physicals are in September! That’s so soon. But we are making progress. Lycus actually had to be seen earlier than expected. I noticed a change in his eyes, a white cloudiness. We had a few days until Dr. Vanderford would be able to see Lycus so I began using the ophthalmoscope (a lighted instrument that is used to exam the inside of the eye) during training. Luckily, they are curious little animals so it didn’t take long for me to be able to hold up the ophthalmoscope and shine the light into their eyes.

Demonstrating the ophthalmoscope on a stuffed lemur

To exam Lycus’ eyes Dr.V came down to the lemur building, we actually have shelves on each stall door. I called Lycus up to the shelf and she checked out his eyes while I supplied the treats. She also checked out Cassandra’s eyes, for comparison. Dr. V thought it was best to have Dr. English come check out Lycus.

For Dr. English‘s visit we had to bring Lycus down to the vet room, which is in the main building. That meant being crated and a ride in the vehicle. Dr. English confirmed that Lycus, who is 27, has old age related cataracts. Although it was earlier than expected, Lycus did very well. In fact, two days later I tried crate training (while crossing my fingers) and he went right in without issue. Him and I have been taking short rides in the vehicle as part of training. He’s doing great!

Lycus on one of our rides around campus

Julie Grimes and I plan on bringing Lycus to the vet room and using training to call him out of his crate. With hopes that he doesn’t bounce around the room and that he goes back into his crate on his own.

So that’s were we are at. I feel like Cassandra is ready to take some short rides in the vehicle and Satyrus has been doing great as well.

Lycus relaxing in his side-yard doorway

Join the conversation:

  1. How exciting! Well done Kimberly. Will you treat Lycus’ cataracts?

    Posted by leslie
  2. Keeper Comment :

    Thanks Leslie! Dr English isn’t overly concerned with them, we’ll just monitor them for now.

    Posted by Kimberly Lawson

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Another visit from Dr. English

June 29th, 2012

 Dr. English was in last Thursday to check on the eyes of 11 of our animals. He looked at our four barred owls and two screech owls, the donkey, Ladybelle ferret, Baby salamander, Lycus the ring tailed lemur, and Bugsy rabbit. He comes by every year (see some photos from his visit last year).

Here are a couple photos from this year’s visit (with help from another veterinarian and his tech Rachel too).

 

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Busy week for Veterinarians

June 11th, 2010

You already know Yona saw a bunch of Vets on Tuesday.  

Dr. Carter was here for monthly rounds this past Sunday.

And Dr. English was here yesterday. He checked on the eyes of ten Museum animals. ( All 5 barred owls, both screech owls, our red tail hawk, donkey, and spotted salamander.

Click above on “Dr. English” to read about him.

Dr. English checks Christopher the Barred Owl

Tech Rachel holds our new screech owl for a quick check.

Even salamanders get checked. This one has lipid deposits on its eyes and is almost blind.

Lightning has been having repeated eye issues. Dr. English thinks Lightning is doing it to himself?!?

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *