Posts Tagged ‘duck’

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

National Farm Animal Awareness Week 2014

September 13th, 2014

September 14th – 20th is National Farm Animal Awareness Week!

 

 

While the museum isn’t celebrating the week in the same way we do Bear Awareness Week or Wolf Awareness Week, you should still come out and say hello to your favorite Farmyard animals. You can even buy a Duck to help offset the cost of feeding our hoofstock and maybe win a really awesome prize on October 4th when the ducks race at the American Tobacco campus!

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.
Tags: , ,

A loss in the department

January 7th, 2014

Sadly, I’m writing this blog to let you know about our most recent loss, Scout. Scout was a big part of my career here, he hatched only a few days before I started. We would pal around in the mornings together in the farmyard before the museum would open. You could call him and he would come to you, at night he would know how to get to his stall and depending what time of year it was you had to run from him so he wouldn’t attack your legs. Some of the times before we would open his stall in the morning I would shout “RELEASE THE QUACKEN!” (on homage to “Release the Kraken!” stated by Zeus in 1981′s Clash of the Titans .) He had the prettiest blue eyes and loved sweet potatoes.

Duck became ill and we brought him to the vet school where it was determined he had anemia and several other problems we cant be sure of until the necropsy results come in.

I was recently working on a blog about duck and his enrichment. I have decided to include it in this entry along with a slide show of Scout.

YouTube Preview Image

 

 

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Keeper Comment :

    Who’s going to teach the kids that “anything with a mouth can bite”? I miss Ducky greatly, especially first thing in the morning when I’m raking the farmyard. It’s weird without him underfoot, perching on the trailer or bug hunting nearby.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg
  2. I didn’t know Scout as well as I suppose I should have, although I’ve heard plenty of stories of his daring escapades. All things considered, I’ve never met a bad duck. Scout
    will be missed.

    Posted by Ranger Greg
  3. Great video, Jill. I will miss duck greatly. I still have the small stuffed lion that we let him snuggle up to when he was a tiny duckling. It sits by my computer and I think of him whenever I see it.

    Posted by Marilyn
  4. Great video and tribute to a one of a kind duck! He will missed.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  5. Hello!

    Posted by makers

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

What’s on Aaron’s leg?

June 14th, 2013

It’s been a busy week in the bear yard. Last Friday we were dealing with fence damage from the storm. On Wednesday bear pools were cleaned, the yard was scooped, mowing and weed-eating occurred, and trees were pruned from around fences.

Aaron showed me his leg first thing Thursday morning, and of course I decided to show you. Thougths?

What did Aaron walk into in the bear yard?

 

Even the Duck wants to know

 

 

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  1. Chiggars. Ooo.

    Posted by Wendy
  2. Razor burn

    Posted by Jill
  3. Poison Ivy

    Posted by Sarah

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Trimming Duck’s Wings

February 13th, 2013

Have you ever wandered into the farmyard and asked yourself, “Why doesn’t the duck simply fly away?”

There are three answers:

1. He does, sometimes. As you can see here in an older post.

2. He seasonally has wing feathers trimmed to help keep him down on the ground.

3. At nearly 11 pounds, he’s a little bit too chubby to really get off the ground.

 

In the early spring and fall, Ducky molts (loses) his old feathers and grows a nice new set in. This would prepare him for long, seasonal migration flights, if he were a wild duck. These young feathers, called ‘blood’ or ‘pin’ feathers, have a great blood supply and birds need to be handled carefully when they’re coming in. Once the pin feathers grow out completely into flight feathers, we can safely trim them back to keep our duck grounded.

Keeper Kent holds Ducky snugly with Duck’s feet tucked into his arm to keep Katy safe from his claws. Kent is also extending Duck’s right wing in this photo

Duck wing extended

Keeper Katy extends Duck’s left wing and counts the feathers to be trimmed. 

Katy trims feathers

With rounded bandage scissors, Keeper Katy starts to trim away feathers

more feathers trimmed

You can see the small gap the missing feathers are creating in Duck’s wing, this is what stops him from flying.

weighing ducky

Kent and Katy place Ducky down onto a scale for weighing. The rubber bowl gives his feet traction so he doesn’t slide off the metal scale.

sitting duck

Trimming feathers might look a little rough, but it doesn’t seem to bother our duck very much.

Join the conversation:

  1. do you need to do both wings?

    Posted by bette fredrickson
  2. Yes, Bette, we do trim both wings. If we only did one wing, our duck would be very off balance if he were to hop up onto a higher surface and try to flutter back down to the ground. With only one wing trimmed, he might spin or crash to the ground, but with both done, it takes him only 2 or 3 attempts before he figures out how to descend from higher ground safely.

    Posted by Sarah

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Scout, the Muscovy Duck

December 10th, 2012

If you travel up to the farmyard, you will notice that we have a domesticated Muscovy duck named Scout. He doesn’t quack because Muscovy ducks hiss. Scout is 6 years old and I know this because he and I have been here at the museum the same time. He came as an egg from Keeper Kent. He hatched only a few days before I started working here. When he was little he was actually on display in  Carolina Wildlife in one of the snake exhibits…minus the snake of course. When he was a little bigger we would put him in a kiddie pool and let him swim around, it was kind of cute because he was afraid of the water at first . Eventually, he got big enough where we moved him into the farmyard during the day and he would follow us back to the building at night for safety. Now, Scout lives permanently in the farmyard.He had a brief roommate encounter with the pig, which you can read about here.

Scout has a lot of personality. He has his moments where he will wander around the farmyard before we open and search for bugs quietly. Majority of the time he is “talkative” and can be real moody.  He can be  nippy and likes to jump on ankles holding on with his feet and beak (it really hurts in the summer time).

Here at the museum the keepers love duck for who he is despite the mood he is in. Its just a part of who he is and we accept it.

If you have any questions about Scout, jot them down in the comment section.

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  1. I have been examinating out a few of your stories and i can claim pretty nice stuff. I will definitely bookmark your site.

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Farmyard Pumpkin Fest 2012

November 8th, 2012

Only a couple days after we were given that truckload of giant pumpkins, I answered a radio call from Sherry telling me to drive the gator very carefully so I wouldn’t spill the cargo (I didn’t spill any).

more pumpkins

The pumpkin chariot

With our Quarantine stall in the Farmyard already full of pumpkins, something needed to be done to whittle down the collection.

The result: Pumpkin Fest 2012

piggy

Miss Piggy rarely climbs the fence, but pumpkins are a special occasion

ducky

Ducky likes to eat the seeds

There was even some pumpkin smashing!

pumpkin smashing

Jennifer (Exhibits Department) was in the Farmyard and volunteered to help smash some pumpkins.

goats donkey

The little goats and Lightning chow down. They had orange noses the next day.

max chum

Max and Chummix like to eat the guts of the pumpkins.

happy goat

Chummix seemed pleased.

alpacas

The alpacas haven’t gotten into the spirit just yet. Don’t worry, though, we have plenty more pumpkins.

 

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  1. Love these!

    Posted by Ranger Ro

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Signs of the Season

November 2nd, 2012

Ranger Greg may have noticed the first signs of the impending season change back in August, but here in the Animal Department, we hold off until the middle of October to make our changes from the summer heat to the winter cold. We also have our animals to let us know when it’s time to shut off the fans and turn on the heaters. Scout, the duck, molts all of his old summer feathers to prepare for what would be a fall migration and he starts running around the farmyard in the morning like he’s training for a race. Henry, the woodchuck, and our 4 bears, all pack on a few pounds with the start of fall and then slow way down, spending most of their days sleeping. The bears, wolves, steer, donkey and many others begin to grow in an extra thick coat of fur to ward off the impending cold.

 

One of my favorite signs of the season comes from our Red-tailed Hawk, Misha. Our normally quiet, calm hawk becomes very chatty in the early hours of the autumn mornings.

YouTube Preview Image

 

Join the conversation:

  1. I love that you got footage of Misha doing this! I’ve heard him but never seen him.

    Posted by sherrys
  2. whoah this weblog is magnificent i really like reading your articles. Stay up the good work! You recognize, many persons are searching around for this information, you could aid them greatly.

    Posted by mobilabonnement

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

The Plot Thickens…

August 7th, 2012

Scout seems to have overheard Lightning and Max plotting a few months back and Lightning and Auggie, too! It’s time for some investigation into what all the fuss is about.

Max and Ducky

What do you think all the chatter is about? Maybe our former interns were right, it is all about the sheep.

Join the conversation:

  1. Scout: “I’m just glad cows don’t fly. Hahahahahaha”

    Max: “You really quack me up.”

    Posted by Wendy
  2. It absolutely has to be about the sheep and, of course, the Alpacas. Exactly what they’re saying I can’t know but it’s probably something that they don’t want the sheep to know. Have you noticed any of the other animals talking to the sheep lately?

    Posted by Ranger Greg
  3. Just received a female 3 year old domestic bred ring tail lemur. How do I know when she is in season via behavior and physical signs? Do females make a constant purring sound during this or any other circumstances? She was parent raised for the first 8 months.
    thanks for any input…i have experience with prosimians but not this species

    Posted by juliann
  4. Director Comment :

    To ask us questions directly, email us directly thru the museum’s website: ncmls.org
    also, training class: http://www.durrell.org/Training/Courses/Captive-Care-and-Conservation-of-Callitrichids–Lemurs—–/

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Poetry and so much more

August 27th, 2011

Whenever someone gets hurt by a Museum animal, we write a report. It’s a record so we can make sure safety procedures are followed, note any patterns, and adjust procedures accordingly.

Scout, our duck that lives in the Farmyard, is known, at times, for nipping at the legs of his caretakers. Sarah mentioned in our staff meeting that Scout  nipped at Intern Julia’s leg, and broke no skin. I told Sarah I looked forward to reading her Haiku and Sonnet report of the incident. Little did I know that she would take me up on both.

Enjoy!

Haiku
A summer duck bite:
a volunteer’s calf was bruised,
no Band-Aid needed

English (Shakespearean) Sonnet Form:
On Tuesday last, the morning sun did shine,
the small, white duck had wagged his feathered tail.
Bright morning light disturbed his slumber time,
and brought with it a world of screams and yells.

The steer had moo-ed for hay and purple shirts,
for hours before the Gator would arrive.
It’s not a wonder that the duck was curt,
he hadn’t slept a wink since half-past five!

Then when the intern showed up at his door,
he flapped and hissed and bit with rage abound.
He simply could not take anymore
his pent up anger must escape somehow.

I know the lack of sleep can make your whole day suck,
but when you’re Scout, you just don’t give a duck

Join the conversation:

  1. I’m thinking Nobel Prize (Literature) for the Haiku and Rhysling Prize for the Sonnet. I’ll share my winnings with Ducky, of course…I wonder how many superworms a half-million dollars can buy…

    Posted by Sarah
  2. Hilarious!!!! Great job Sarah.

    Posted by Erin Brown
  3. Nobel literature prize? Is this not grand enough for the Nobel Peace prize?!?

    Posted by Sherry
  4. Keeper Comment :

    hahaha that’s awesome Sarah!!

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson

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by , Keeper
I am most famous here in the animal department for "expanding" the barred owl exhibit, clogging the wolf pool, and splitting my pants. My other less notorious work, since 2003, includes keeping, purchasing our animal supplies, coordinating our volunteers, and managing our animal enrichment program.
Find me training the lemurs or in other various animal enclosures Monday through Friday, or at the grocery store on Wednesdays, when I shop for produce!

EnrichBits: Roommates

May 23rd, 2008

EnrichBits: A monthly look at animal enrichment

Enrichment is all about providing opportunities to our animals that help them to exhibit their natural behaviors. Opossums wouldn’t find many recycle bins to snooze in out in the wild ( well, at least not many bins they’d be welcome in!) but they would find a similar shaped place, like a hollow tree stump, that was a sheltered and hidden nook. Bears wouldn’t be flipping over traffic cones looking for bear chow in a natural setting, but they would be flipping over logs looking for grubs.
So it’s our goal for animals who live in groups, herds, etc in a natural setting, to live in those types of groups here at the museum. This is part of Social Enrichment. Housing animals in social groups is sometimes essential to their overall health and well being. When you see one of our red-ruffed lemurs grooming another, you are witnessing a natural behavior that couldn’t happen if they lived alone. Social enrichment is so important that we even pair up different species of animals so they have a living mate! Of course we have to seriously consider all the risks involved, like disease transmission or incompatibility. Can you think of an example of two different species who live together here at the museum?

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Join the conversation:

  1. Two exhibit turtles live together! At least one of them loves it.

    Posted by Larry

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