Posts Tagged ‘Erin’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

some PG uses for blow-up dolls

April 14th, 2014

erin and staceyYou know we do emergency drills so we are more prepared should something  happen at the Museum. I cannot really let a bear out, or throw a person into the bear pool, so I have props. Stuffed animal bears or lemurs, and even fake people, as seen on the right. If you want to read previous blog posts about our trainings click on any of the links below.

black bear escape

Leslie bear escape

lemur escape

person in distress

 

This “blow-up” guy getting a hug from Erin has a creepy reputation at the Museum. I used him most recently to play the part of a missing kid hiding in the woods somewhere. Staff had to find him and get him to his mom who was nervously awaiting his return.

So, I am watching TV last week and get super-excited! Look who I see in the background of the radio studio (TV Show Monk, episode “Mr. Monk is on the Air” 2.7.07):

 

blow up man (2)

 

 

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  1. Awww, I got a shout-out! Miss you guys!

    Posted by Leslie

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Photos of Erin

March 4th, 2011

Erin was in the office yesterday eating leftover cake from Kristen’s Baby Shower and got some frosting on her chin.

It reminded me of other amusing photos I had of Erin so I thought I’d share.

The end-of-year animal department potluck features a grab-bag of presents. Some people think some of the items wrapped are not worth keeping (shocking, I know). I wrapped up a surplus saddle from one of the horses in the Play to Learn exhibit area and someone LEFT IT BEHIND. Erin worked hard to show Kristen ways in which the saddle could be adapted for use during pregnancy.

Erin trying to be creative with a saddle from a stuffed animal horse!

A couple years (yes, really) Erin, Larry, and I were scooping poop in the bear yard and I made asked Erin to test out Ursula’s bed for comfort. I think we made sure there was no poop in the bed before I shoved her in, but I cannot remember anymore!

Erin testing out Ursula's bed

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Hall repairs.

November 20th, 2010

We have a bunch of repairs and upgrades going on behind-the-scenes. On November 8th, there were 4 different contractors doing work in or around the animal department and animal exhibits. The scheduled work behind the exhibits in Carolina Wildlife was to fix a main water valve as well as repair damaged walls behind the scenes. We had to move the snake cages in preparation for the work. Two of the cages were set out in Carolina Wildlife, as seen below. The venomous snake cages were locked up in the Exam Room, and the rest of the snake cages were moved and housed with our education reptiles.

Erin so kindly modeled for me, what it looks like with no snake cages set up in  Carolina Wildlife. (Yes, Erin is back and helping out temporarily). Many keepers came in really early in the morning so we could deal with things before the water was shut off.

The water valve that needed replacing was back near the snake cages and made quite a mess. The plumber was wonderful, but it took just about all day to deal with the multiple issues that popped up so there was no water in the Museum until about 4:00. This is why we plan these projects for closed Mondays.

On the plumber’s list was to also start the plumbing work for our new space that’s being built. Unfortunately, something broke that shouldn’t have and before we knew it we had a hole in our bathroom wall and the toilet was gone. It didn’t matter too terribly much as there was no water int he building anyway, but it was a little weird to see the outside through an area that used to have a wall and a toilet.

We’re not done yet” the repairs to the snake hall are still finishing up. Our kitchen and food storage areas are being redone (I just ordered the cabinets and counter tops today). By Spring things should be great- new an expanded counter tops and cabinets, walk in freezers, and the additional space will be finished. It will be a rocky road until then, but we’ll be much better able to do our jobs and take care of the animals when done!

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  1. Have you considered keeping Erin on permanent display?

    Posted by Ranger Greg
  2. Director Comment :

    That’s a great idea Greg!
    I’ll turn in our licensing paperwork to see if we can exhibit an NC native Homo sapien.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost:Yona bear update

November 11th, 2010

 

The picture above doesn’t do justice to Yona as her hair has grown back in since her surgery in September. We expect to be letting Yona back into the exhibit in just one week! It will be eight weeks since her surgery and she is doing really well. Her limp has mostly diminished and we’re really happy with how things have gone.

I was looking through some emails and blogs and came across a really great video that Karyn took back in the spring- before she volunteered or worked at the Museum!  Yona is  much larger now than she was in April when this video was taken! 

Go to the following post written by Erin:   http://blogs.lifeandscience.org/keepers/2010/05/05/how-enriching/ to take a look.

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  1. I can’t wait to see her in the yard again! I hope the other bears didn’t get too accustomed to her absence.

    Posted by Leslie

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

A wet and wild slip n’ slide

October 5th, 2010

You may have noticed that it rained a lot last week. I think it actually rained every day, as I worked outside in it quite a bit. I don’t know about you, but when it rains that much, I try and think of all the good things that will come from it, instead of just focusing on the fact that I can’t seem to dry out. And while it’s good to think of these benefits to the rain, sometimes there are negative results that may never occur to you. Now, the obvious negative effects are flooding, power outages, trees down and lots of mud, among others. But last Thursday morning, Mikey and I encountered something that I had never thought about!

This is an old picture of Erin, one of our former keepers, and our wonderful volunteer, Donald. Although it's not a recent picture, I thought it told the story of working in the rain quite well!

The morning started out as any other morning in Explore The Wild: We threw food to the bears from on top of the cliff while making our way to ETW (the area where ETW is built used to be a large rock quarry, so our bear and wolf exhibits both have rock cliff in them), and then we stopped at lemurs to clean the glass at Inside Viewing, check on the lemurs, and check the temperatures in the house. Then we made our way over to the wolf exhibit to check on our male wolf and walk the fence. We walk our wolf fence daily to make sure there is no digging, no breaks in the fence, or tree limbs on top of the fence. We checked the electric fence first to see what it was reading. This is good to do before you walk the fence, so that you know to look for something wrong if the voltage is reading lower than normal. On this particular morning, the fence was reading “zero”. It’s pretty normal for our fences to read lower than normal when it’s been raining, but it should never read zero. So Mikey and I set off to find the source of the problem. It didn’t take us long to find, as we rounded the corner to the fence by the holding cages and were stopped in our tracks by a large rock slide that had occurred overnight. No doubt, the slide was brought on by a combination of the natural effects of erosion, and the large amount of rain that we had received throughout the week.

Although it’s not a good thing that we had a rock slide fall on our wolf fence, I must admit that it was an impressive display of geology at work. I also couldn’t help but think to myself that we prepare for all sorts of disasters with our job, but never once had we trained for a large rock slide. It just goes to show that you never know what to expect in this line of work!

So Mikey and I started to assess the damage: there were large rocks leaning on the fence, and the fence was bowed in, but it was still intact and the wolf was safely contained in the exhibit. So what was causing the fence to short out?  We kept looking, and soon found the problem. There was a spot where the fence was being pushed in so much by the large rocks that it was touching the electric wire and causing the short. I radioed Sherry and explained the situation to her, and she promptly came down to assess the slide with her own eyes. Mikey and I finished walking the fence to make sure there were no other issues, and then stayed with Sherry while she devised a plan of action. Of course, the first thing to do was get the rocks off the fence. Some of our awesome exhibits guys were called and they drove the Bobcat over to help move the large rocks easier. Anything that could be moved by hand was done so. Although the rocks were still in large chunks, they were literally crumbling as they were being picked up. So for some of the larger rocks, the facilities guys broke them down with a sledge hammer first.

It took the majority of the morning, but the exhibits guys did an excellent job of moving all the large rocks off the fence. Mikey and I had to take care of shoveling away some smaller stuff, and then hosing all the dirt and small rocks out of the holding pen in order to check the very bottom of the fence. Everything was still intact, even if it looked a little battered and bowed in. The electric fence also started working again, so we were fine. But it made for an interesting morning on a day that started out “normal”!

This was after some of the larger stuff had started to get moved with the Bobcat. The fence behind Jim is where the electric wire had shorted out due to the rocks pushing the fence in. If you look closely, you can see one of the electric wires running across the fence.

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  1. Wow! Thanks for posting all those photos of the rock slide (and having the presence of mind to take them in the midst of everything). You never know what each day will bring!

    Posted by Karyn
  2. This video was hilarious. Auggie may need to work on his quick turns when running around the tight
    corner; perhaps watching more NASCAR would help.

    Posted by Tony Landavazo

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Biggest Bummer for Bloggies

June 23rd, 2010

I have very sad news for our faithful readers. It is with a heavy heart that I tell you that Larry and Erin will be leaving their jobs at the Museum. They are heading off for wonderful new adventures, which is great for them, but will leave a big void in our animal keeping and blogging world.

I am sure each of them will write farewell posts, I hope each of them will occasionally write a guest post, and  I know each of them will continue to check in and comment on our Blog.

Please share stories or warm wishes in the comment section. We’ll all miss both of them tremendously.

Do you want to know what Erin is about to do?

Larry, with volunteer Annie and Little, our chicken.

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  1. Keeper Comment :

    Hint: You do not want to know what I’m about to do. If more than 5 non-animal department people ask, then I WILL tell you and there WILL be pictures and you do NOT want pictures.

    Posted by Erin Brown
  2. Oh the PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW!

    Posted by jebrown
  3. I REALLY WANT TO KNOW NOW! now now now!!

    Posted by Stacey
  4. Keeper Comment :

    Hint: I’m unwrapping a needle, and it’s not for something animal related. And I’m wearing gloves. Enter at your own risk.

    Posted by Erin Brown
  5. Awe, that is a bummer. Best if luck, Larry and Erin, on your future adventures!

    Posted by Kristen
  6. Erin and Larry, I hope your new adventures are great and wonderful. I enjoyed working with both of you and will miss you on my visits.

    Mike

    Posted by Mike Fink

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by , Keeper
I started volunteering at the museum when I was 13 (I'm 22, and they pay me now, which is nice). Favorite work activities include, but are not limited to: bathing our steer, talking about bears, playing guitar (sometimes for the animals) and riding my bike around grounds. And blogging, of course.
I work Tues-Sat and can be tweeched @ernbrn.
Tags: , ,

QuikPost: Personal Ad

June 18th, 2010

Single white and brown male with more to love seeking someone to play footsie with.


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  1. Being that I am known for looking at personal ads, this is actually better then the ones that are really out there. He looks so sane!

    Posted by jebrown
  2. A very mooooving picture…

    Posted by Wendy

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by , Keeper
I started volunteering at the museum when I was 13 (I'm 22, and they pay me now, which is nice). Favorite work activities include, but are not limited to: bathing our steer, talking about bears, playing guitar (sometimes for the animals) and riding my bike around grounds. And blogging, of course.
I work Tues-Sat and can be tweeched @ernbrn.

In Memory of Beaker

April 9th, 2010
A while back Marilyn did a post about our off-exhibit opossum, Beaker. Beaker can also be seen enthusiastically eating a pumpkin as part of the pumpkin montage. Sadly, Beaker was an old opossum (he was 3, which is about as old as they get in captivity), and on Sunday when our vet was here he had a seizure and had to be euthanized. He had been showing signs of going downhill for that last couple of months, so while this wasn’t surprising, it was really sad for us.

Marilyn mentioned in her post that Beaker is special to us, and that’s really true. Almost every single day he’d be out on our hall walking around for almost the entire day. It was to the point where it was more abnormal for him not to be on the hall then it was for him to be. He provided daily cute yet mischievous companionship for us.

One thing I liked to say about Beaker is that he’s “all ‘possum”.  I say this because opossums do this thing called scent marking. They do it a lot during breeding season, it’s when they lick something and then rub the sides of their heads against it. It’s like marking their territory. Well, it happened to be Beaker’s second favorite past time (second only to eating) no matter the season. He scent marked EVERYTHING with great vigor. Like it was his job. Like it was his calling that he took very seriously. Like he looked like he enjoyed it so much that I’m half tempted to try it out to see what all the hype’s about. I find it to be simulaneously disgusting and enthralling. Which is why I give you the shmear montage in memory of this ‘possum who was as ‘possum as a ‘possum could be. Enjoy.

Join the conversation:

  1. Thanks for sharing. The montage was very cute. At least he had a passion in life and really went with it.

    Posted by Emily
  2. Goodbye, Beakie boy. We’ll miss you!

    Posted by Wendy
  3. Web Geek Comment :

    I think the title of the video should be “MINE MINE MINE.” RIP Beaker.

    Posted by Beck Tench
  4. Beaker will be greatly missed….you were the best sniffer!

    Posted by Courtney
  5. He was always good at finding crumbs

    Posted by jillb
  6. Very cute. We will miss Beaker!

    Posted by Shawntel
  7. What an adorable video!!

    Posted by Retta
  8. Keeper Comment :

    Good video, Erin. Beaker was definitely a special opossum.

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson

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by , Keeper
I started volunteering at the museum when I was 13 (I'm 22, and they pay me now, which is nice). Favorite work activities include, but are not limited to: bathing our steer, talking about bears, playing guitar (sometimes for the animals) and riding my bike around grounds. And blogging, of course.
I work Tues-Sat and can be tweeched @ernbrn.

Chinchilla Chillin’

March 11th, 2010

As you well know by now, Nimbus the super adorable rabbit has been living in the building instead of the farmyard where she’s usually found. She’s still doing ok, she has good days and bad days, but she’s eating well and gets extra love and attention since she hangs out where we are for a lot of the day.

Her being in the building has also given her the chance to make some new friends with some of our animals who are used for education. She spends most of her days these days with Little, our silky chicken (we just call her Chicken). Here they share breakfast:

Nimbus also got to meet Bugsy, our male rabbit, for the first time. She almost immediately started grooming him. Here’s a video (uh, this is an edited version). **WARNING** You have never seen anything this cute:

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And then she got some supervised play time with our chinchillas Salt and Pepper. I love the way she gets so animated when they first come out. She really seems to be interested in the other creatures. It was fun to watch Nimbus’s ears as Salt and Pepper split up to explore different parts of the room–she kept one ear following each. **WARNING** This is also really cute:

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Maybe Bugsy and Nimbus can play catch together! I will definitely keep you updated on that…

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by , Keeper
I started volunteering at the museum when I was 13 (I'm 22, and they pay me now, which is nice). Favorite work activities include, but are not limited to: bathing our steer, talking about bears, playing guitar (sometimes for the animals) and riding my bike around grounds. And blogging, of course.
I work Tues-Sat and can be tweeched @ernbrn.

How to catch a stuffed lemur

February 19th, 2010

If you’ve seen our lemurs up in Explore the Wild, you might have noticed that they have collars on their necks. Here’s a good picture of Lycus the Ring Tailed lemur where you can clearly see his collar:

Our Red Ruffed lemurs have them too, and both species wear them all the time. We put these collars on our lemurs for the same reason you put a collar on your dog: to help us get them back if they escape. But it’s not your usual dog collar with their name and our phone number. Instead, each collar has a little radio transmitter, and each one has a unique frequency that it puts out. It’s just like each collar is it’s own radio station, and we have a tracker that has an antennae that picks up the stations. So if Lycus were to escape, we would turn our tracker on the Lycus station (it doesn’t actually play music, but if it did, his would be mostly classical with swing and big band at night, and jazz on the weekends) and we would be able to hone in on his location.

We have an extra collar that we put on a stuffed lemur, and Sherry routinely hides the lemur somewhere on grounds and tells us to go find it. So the other Thursday after Larry and I were done cleaning up in Explore the Wild, we set off to find ourselves a stuffed lemur. *Sigh*, my job is sooooo boring.
We started near the lemur house. Larry had done lemur tracking many a time, and I had him school me on the finer points of it. I made a little video. It starts with Larry’s tutorial and jumps to me right behind the Butterfly House getting a strong signal from the parking lot. Then it jumps to me standing in the woods right beside the parking lot where the lemur was hidden. I wish the video were more thorough, but I kinda got enthralled with the whole thing (it was pretty thrilling to be riding around on the vehicle with a giant antennae hanging out of the side listening intently for a faint beep).
YouTube Preview Image

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