Posts Tagged ‘farmyard’

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

Max’s Medication

April 5th, 2014

A couple of weeks ago Max, the steer, wasn’t feeling very well. He had some loose stool, a runny nose and wasn’t as interested in his food as normal. We had Dr. Cannedy come out to look at him to find out what was wrong. Dr. Cannedy came out and gave Max some medication to help with his stool quality as well as medication to help with the other symptoms. One of the issues was Max had an intestinal parasite. In order to treat this parasite Dr. Cannedy gave us medication to give to Max for the next 4 days. We were to give Max 2 tablets crushed into his chow with a little molasses dribbled over it to cover up the taste. Max weighs 774.0 kg (1702.8 lbs.) so his medication is a lot larger than what many of our other animals would get. Below are pictures of Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 029

Max’s medication is on the Right – 2 of these tablets per day crushed into food. The medications on the Left are an Aspirin tablet, Cosequin capsule, Baytril tablet and a Papaya pill.

2014 Mar 13 032

Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 030

Side view of Max’s medication.

2014 Mar 13 033

Max taking his medication like a good boy!!!

Max took his medication very well. The molasses helped a great deal! Max was also given Gatorade water which he drinks very quickly! And now Max is doing much better and is almost completely back to his normal self!

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  1. the photos, even with the ruler and coins, don’t do justice to just how big these pills were!

    Posted by sherry

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

A couple more snow photos

February 5th, 2014

Ro got some more “snow photos

The Farmyard is very pretty in the snow

 

no issues for the alpacas in the snow

 

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Back to the Farmyard

December 1st, 2013

It has been awhile since I was last in the FarmyardAll the changes that the animal department has had for the past few months has kept me in Explore the Wild most of the time.  Last week, I got to go back to the Farmyard.  It was great to see all of the farmyard animals and catch myself up on the duties of farmyard keeping.

Keeper Jill helped me reacquaint myself with the Farmyard tasks plus gave me some tips on time management when it comes to getting tasks completed.  Getting this information is vital when keeping in the Farmyard since there is a lot to do in the mornings.  Now that I got a refresher in the Farmyard, you should see me there most Fridays.

After lunch, I went up to the Farmyard and checked on all of the animals.  Once done with the tasks,  I was walking by the Alpacas and saw this…

 

Ray on top of the mountain.

Ray looked very stoic with the sunlight in her hair but the picture does not do her justice.  So, come by the farmyard and hopefully you will see Ray on the mountain.

 

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Rabbit joy!

September 18th, 2013

The other day I was in the farmyard and observing our two rabbits, Betty and Jean.

Occasionally, I will give them access to run around inside the whole barn where they are kept so they can get some exploring time before guests arrive.

At this time, I see them hopping back and forth and sometimes they will jump in the air and twist. This behavior is associated with positivity and excitement. This behavior actually has a name and its called “binky.” Unfortunately, I dont have a video of our rabbits cutting a binky, but there are many on youtube!

YouTube Preview Image

 

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  1. I would like to see video of keepers imitating cutting a binky instead of random unknown rabbits.

    Posted by Leslie

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

QuikPic: The Rabbits Are Shedding

July 30th, 2013

I had more bunny fur on me than Jean!

 

All the fur! And they’re not even close to finished shedding. (And yes, that’s Franklin the Tortoise in the background, he gets exercise time in the farmyard once in a while)

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  1. that’s crazy!

    Posted by sherry
  2. My corgis do that.

    Posted by Wendy

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Max, being Max

July 6th, 2013

He’s almost 1,700 pounds and stands about 5 feet tall at the shoulder (the height is a guess, he tried to eat my tape measure). Max weighs more than all 4 of our bears put together and can poop the combined weight of our baby alpacas every day! He has a well documented adoration of shoes and Kent. You’ll just have to trust me on the Kent part, or come visit some day and listen to Max bellow when Kent drives by and doesn’t stop to scratch him.

 

Max, besides being one of the more affectionate animals in the farmyard, is arguably one of the most playful. Keeper Jill and I decided to give an old piece of enrichment (a garden hose with plastic chains attached to it) a farewell send off by letting Max have it. He didn’t destroy it like we expected he would, but it was fun to watch him knock his big head into it.

YouTube Preview Image

 

And if you want to check my math:

Max weighs about 1,700 pounds

Max can poop between 150 and 200 pounds a day (10% of his body weight)

The bears weigh, at most 350 pounds (x 4 = max of 1,400 pounds)

The baby alpacas weigh 100 pounds (Emily) and 77 pounds (Ray) combined = 177 pounds

The take home message of all this: Max poops a lot.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Naked Alpacas

April 23rd, 2013

We used to have naked sheep once a year- check out last year’s sheep shearing. The four of them lost about 21 pounds of wool. Much less than the 35 pounds the 4 sheep took off last year This is our first year shearing alpacas and today was the day. They no longer look like this:

 

Ray experiences her first complete shearing

Jonathan lays the alpacas down, straightens them out, and ties their legs. It goes pretty quickly and easily.

 

come look how skinny Emily is!

 We’ll get some video and more photos up in the near future, but do come by and check out the girls. I am sure the keepers will want to talk about hairdo options and more!

Join the conversation:

  1. Awww- Ray was so fluffy before! Now they all look like drenched crazy giraffe poodles.

    Posted by kelly
  2. What’s going to happen with the wool?

    Posted by Wendy
  3. Director Comment :

    We divided the wool into “good quality” and “bad quality”. We’ll use the latter for enrichment for other animals as well as educational programs. We’re not sure yet what we will do with the “good quality”. Sell, make things…

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  4. What’s the difference between good and bad quality wool?

    Posted by Wendy
  5. The good stuff is taken strictly from the body. The neck, legs and head isnt really good enough to use and its not as long as the hairs on the body

    Posted by Jill
  6. Sounds like a good fund raiser.

    Posted by Hans
  7. They are so skinny now. Imagine what our bears would look like if we shaved them!

    Posted by kimberly

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Scout, the Muscovy Duck

December 10th, 2012

If you travel up to the farmyard, you will notice that we have a domesticated Muscovy duck named Scout. He doesn’t quack because Muscovy ducks hiss. Scout is 6 years old and I know this because he and I have been here at the museum the same time. He came as an egg from Keeper Kent. He hatched only a few days before I started working here. When he was little he was actually on display in  Carolina Wildlife in one of the snake exhibits…minus the snake of course. When he was a little bigger we would put him in a kiddie pool and let him swim around, it was kind of cute because he was afraid of the water at first . Eventually, he got big enough where we moved him into the farmyard during the day and he would follow us back to the building at night for safety. Now, Scout lives permanently in the farmyard.He had a brief roommate encounter with the pig, which you can read about here.

Scout has a lot of personality. He has his moments where he will wander around the farmyard before we open and search for bugs quietly. Majority of the time he is “talkative” and can be real moody.  He can be  nippy and likes to jump on ankles holding on with his feet and beak (it really hurts in the summer time).

Here at the museum the keepers love duck for who he is despite the mood he is in. Its just a part of who he is and we accept it.

If you have any questions about Scout, jot them down in the comment section.

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Farmyard Pumpkin Fest 2012

November 8th, 2012

Only a couple days after we were given that truckload of giant pumpkins, I answered a radio call from Sherry telling me to drive the gator very carefully so I wouldn’t spill the cargo (I didn’t spill any).

more pumpkins

The pumpkin chariot

With our Quarantine stall in the Farmyard already full of pumpkins, something needed to be done to whittle down the collection.

The result: Pumpkin Fest 2012

piggy

Miss Piggy rarely climbs the fence, but pumpkins are a special occasion

ducky

Ducky likes to eat the seeds

There was even some pumpkin smashing!

pumpkin smashing

Jennifer (Exhibits Department) was in the Farmyard and volunteered to help smash some pumpkins.

goats donkey

The little goats and Lightning chow down. They had orange noses the next day.

max chum

Max and Chummix like to eat the guts of the pumpkins.

happy goat

Chummix seemed pleased.

alpacas

The alpacas haven’t gotten into the spirit just yet. Don’t worry, though, we have plenty more pumpkins.

 

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  1. Love these!

    Posted by Ranger Ro

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPic: Alpaca

October 9th, 2012

The alpacas are doing fine in their temporary quarters, but since you cannot see them here are a couple photos.

Retro, with Ray right behind her.

 

Ray sneaking a snack from her Mama.

Come and see them on October 20 when the Farmyard reopens.

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Can’t wait to see them! Are their heads naturally more fuzzy than the rest of their bodies, or have they been shorn?

    Posted by Laura
  2. Alpacas have been shaved, depending on who does it or what the desires are dictates what the head might look like. If you look around the web there are many interesting cuts out there for alpacas.

    Posted by Jill

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