Posts Tagged ‘Jessi’

by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Birthday Celebration

March 30th, 2014

Cynthia, who is our oldest Red Ruffed Lemur, turned 33 years old on March 30th.  This makes Cynthia the oldest Red Ruffed Lemur in the country.  33 years is old for any lemur considering the average lifespan in captivity is early twenties.  In the wild, lemurs tend to live longer to around mid-twenties.  Since lemurs are endemic to Madagascar, it can be difficult to replicate their dietary and habitat needs in a captive environment.  The keepers felt that 33 years of life for a lemur would be a great reason to celebrate.  On Thursday the 27th, we provided the Red Ruffed Lemurs with a variety of different enrichment items.  They received puzzle feeders, skewers, streamers, and colorful bags with dried fruit.  At the 2pm lemur program, guest sang “Happy Birthday” from Lemur viewing  and keepers talked about Cynthia as well as general information on lemurs.

If you were unable to make it to the Birthday celebration, here are some pictures of the big day….

Decorations in inside viewing at Lemurs.

Decorations in inside viewing which are the enrichment items for not just Cynthia but Jethys and Iris too.

Cynthia checking out what is in the colorful bag.

Cynthia checking out what is in the colorful bag.

 

Cynthia smelling the streamers.

Cynthia smelling the streamers.

 

Cynthia, Jethys and Iris all checking out the enrichment items.

Cynthia, Jethys and Iris all checking out the enrichment items.

 

 

Birthday Cakes

Birthday Cakes

 

Getting more enrichment items for the 2pm program.  This is fruit skewered on paper towel tubes.

Getting more enrichment items for the 2pm program. This is fruit skewered on paper towel tubes.

 

Autumn and I getting a larger paper towel tube ready with mango, kiwi and dried cherries.

Autumn and I getting a larger paper towel tube ready with mango, kiwi and dried cherries.

 

Cynthia going to a puzzle feeder that had a variety of fruit and veggies inside it.

Cynthia going to a puzzle feeder that had a variety of fruit and veggies inside it.

 

Jethys eating one of the birthday cakes.

Jethys eating one of the birthday cakes.

 

Cynthia and the skewered fruit paper towel tube.  Iris is looking in one of the puzzle feeders.

Cynthia and the skewered fruit paper towel tube. Iris is looking in one of the puzzle feeders.

 

The keepers and guest had a great time watching the Red Ruffed Lemurs explore and manipulate their enrichment items.  After it was all over, they all found their spots on the perching and rested.

Time to rest.

Time to rest.

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Early Morning Walk

March 27th, 2014

Lightning and I don’t always have enough time first thing in the morning to make the long walk out to Explore the Wild, but when we do, it’s always worth the trek.

Lightning and I walk on a service path behind the train tracks and meet the moss cattle and deer that inhabit the train pasture

Next, we walk down the paths in Explore the Wild and say, “Good Morning” to the wolves.

 

Then, we stop in at the Bear House and check on Jessi and Autumn…we might have stolen some of Jessi’s breakfast…

 

Lightning goes for a walk every day, as do most of our farmyard animals. Even the pigs and Max! So next time you’re here, if you come by the farmyard and don’t see your favorite furry (or feathered) critter it’s probably a good thing, they’re likely out enjoying the sunshine in the company of a keeper.

Join the conversation:

  1. Love it!

    Posted by Wendy
  2. This could be the start of a good children’s book–”A Donkey’s Day”…Lightning certainly gets into mischief (stealing radios, snitching food…)

    Posted by CVdB
  3. I had no idea the animals went for regular walks…thanks for sharing!

    Posted by Libby
  4. Keeper Comment :

    Absolutely, Libby!

    Walks are an important way for animals to get exercise, explore new places, sights and sounds, and to spend some time bonding with their keepers.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Upcoming Birthday Celebration!

March 23rd, 2014

Cynthia, our oldest Red Ruffed Lemur, will be turning 33 years old on March 30th.  On March 27th, the Explore the Wild team (Autumn and myself) will be providing Cynthia and the other Red Ruffed Lemurs with different types of enrichment and food items so that we can celebrate this milestone.  This will provide the Red Ruffed Lemurs with great opportunities to interact with different food items and enrichment plus give the keepers a chance to take a lot of pictures!  So, this will be very enriching to the keepers.

 

My next post will show what we did for Cynthia on her big day plus how she and the other Red Ruffed Lemurs interacted with all the items.

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Director Comment :

    We’ve already had a couple bags of fruit and other goodies dropped off. Thanks Neighbor:

    http://blogs.lifeandscience.org/keepers/2013/03/24/spotlight-my-anonymous-neighbor/

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  2. Congratulations to Cynthia for being one of the oldest Red-ruffed lemurs in captivity in the world – You go girl!!! Get your party on!!!

    Posted by Katy
  3. Precisely what a beneficial post you will have. Thanks for this promote.Such a informative post you might have.

    Posted by Antonio Bigbee

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Apple Rings

March 21st, 2014

Cassandra and Satyrus getting apple rings for food enrichment.  I think it was a hit!

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Where are the Ring-Tailed Lemurs?

January 30th, 2014

It has been cold lately and that means that the Ring-tailed lemurs have been inside in their indoor holding area.  Since they are inside, we want to make sure that they are getting enriched.  A recent enrichment item that we have used for the lemurs is skewering dried fruit on pumpkins or like in the following pictures on paper towel tubes.

Cassandra and Satyrus. What is this?

 

Satyrus was interested in the new item once Cassandra had inspected it first.

 

Cassandra getting an apricot.

 

Satyrus scent marking the item after eating his fill of apricots.

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Glad Cassandra and Satyrus were comfy and warm. Wondering what the red square with the red x is for? Thank you.

    Posted by dj
  2. Keeper Comment :

    I can answer that, DJ.

    The red box with the X was part of a behavior the Ringtails were learning. The goal was to have them put both their hands in the box and have their back facing the keeper. It’s a harder task to train than you might think, the Ringtails always seem to keep an eye on the keeper that’s working with them and as a team, there was a lot of walking in circles. The hope was that we could then train them to stay there with their hands on the wall so we could look at their back, fur, or apply medication to their skin if we needed to.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Brr, it’s cold…where are the bears?

January 24th, 2014

Our bear exhibit is large and it can be difficult to spot a bear in normal weather but when it is cold it can be very difficult.  So, where are the bears when it is very cold?

(Below) Yona in her hay bed on top of the cliff, in the background you can see the bear house where another bear likes to spend her time.

(Below) Va in her hay bed on the cliff but it is on the opposite side of the cliff so that she is away from Yona.

(Below)  Sweet Mimi in her stall o’ hay.  She can be rather difficult to get up in the mornings to go outside.

(Below)  Gus has claimed the cave as his own.  In this pic, it is difficult to see him and on most days all you see is either one of his big ears or his rump.

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. You have to wake Mimi up in a nice and gentle way or she is very grumpy. I usually say “MiiiiiMiiiiii, wake up, time to get up”. She wont even lift her head up to acknowledge me.

    Posted by Jill

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Caterpillars part 2

December 7th, 2013

In my Caterpillars post, I talked about getting stung by one.  In this post, I will show you a couple of other caterpillars that I found in Explore the Wild.

Once I found one caterpillar, which was a saddleback, my eyes began to see all the other caterpillars that are out in the area.

This caterpillar (above) was on the climbing structure in the lemur yard.  I found it while I was putting the morning food out for the Ring-tailed lemurs.

This caterpillar (below) was on the water bowl in the wolf side cages.

Next time that you are outside, take a closer look at the plants or even different structures and you might see a caterpillar.

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Back to the Farmyard

December 1st, 2013

It has been awhile since I was last in the FarmyardAll the changes that the animal department has had for the past few months has kept me in Explore the Wild most of the time.  Last week, I got to go back to the Farmyard.  It was great to see all of the farmyard animals and catch myself up on the duties of farmyard keeping.

Keeper Jill helped me reacquaint myself with the Farmyard tasks plus gave me some tips on time management when it comes to getting tasks completed.  Getting this information is vital when keeping in the Farmyard since there is a lot to do in the mornings.  Now that I got a refresher in the Farmyard, you should see me there most Fridays.

After lunch, I went up to the Farmyard and checked on all of the animals.  Once done with the tasks,  I was walking by the Alpacas and saw this…

 

Ray on top of the mountain.

Ray looked very stoic with the sunlight in her hair but the picture does not do her justice.  So, come by the farmyard and hopefully you will see Ray on the mountain.

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Thanksgiving Week.

November 28th, 2013

Aaron with Tim, Harvey, Vicky, and Pheobe

On Monday I drove to South Carolina to swap our alligators for smaller ones. Aaron and I arrived at the Museum around 5 AM to catch-up our current alligators. We use under-the-bed storage containers for transport. Our alligators are all less than 4 feet in length:  Drilling air holes and duct taping the container works great for transporting our alligators.

Our Alligators are on loan to us from Alligator Adventure. When ours get too big for their exhibit or holding tank, we exchange them for smaller ones.

This year, we got hatchlings. We like to start with little ones since our exhibit is on the small side. Travis and his crew unpacked our foursome and loaded me up with these little ones. I should have brought them a tiny travel container to share but I forgot, so I loaded the four up into one container for the ride home.

Travis with our newbies

Monday was FREEZING if you recall, and I was worried about these little guys in the back of the van not getting enough heat… So I wedged the container in the seat next to me, turned the air vents toward them, and blasted the heat. I in turn, took off my sweatshirt, sneakers, and socks, and leaned my left arm the on cold window trying to stay cool. I shut the heat off every time I felt like passing out (not really, but emotionally that’s how it felt) and then turned it on again when I felt better. This went on and on for the ride home, and worked fairly well with only one minor incident. At one point, the tub leaned against the window button and the window started down. While confused, I quickly jostled the tub and used my button to close it up. (I did enjoy the burst of cold air though!)

my travel companions wedged into the passenger seat for the ride home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I returned to the Museum it was time for the canebrake rattlesnake to get his/her shot. S/he has a recurring infection of the heat pit and every few years we need to “deal”. Click here to see how we safely do this.

And this is why I am posting today, on Thanksgiving. Jessi and Sarah have the honor of working Thanksgiving, Katy is in so we can give this snake the needed antibiotics. Katy will be gone by 9 AM, and Jessi and Sarah should be out around noon. They’ll leave me a list of what I need to do at closing.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING everyone!

 

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Caterpillars

November 8th, 2013

Did you know that you can be stung by caterpillars?

I was surprised when I got stung by one on the wolf cliff in Explore the Wild.  I didn’t know that it was a caterpillar at first but after describing what it felt like to the other keepers, they said it had to have been a caterpillar.  At that point, I was on a mission to find out what exactly stung me.  I needed to have a plan to properly complete my mission so that I could educate myself, other keepers and museum visitors.

First, I needed to remember where on the wolf cliff that I got stung.  Second, I needed to have a camera on me at all times to capture the creature.  Not a very complex plan but it turned out to be harder than I thought.  Could it have been a sting and run?

After about two weeks, I finally found the creature.  On a small plant, on top of the wolf cliff I found the caterpillar.

 

Any ideas on what kind of caterpillar?

Seeing caterpillars is not new here at the museum.  Keeper Sarah and Ranger Greg have made post on these interesting creatures.  In my next post, I will show you other caterpillars I have encountered while out in Explore the Wild.

 

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Think it may be a Saddleback Caterpillar.

    Posted by Hans
  2. Yes, that is definitely a Saddleback. I’ve been stung more times than I can remember. Unfortunately, it’s not picky about its food plant and can be found almost anywhere. It turns into a small brown moth.

    Posted by Richard
  3. Keeper Comment :

    Richard, thanks for the information. I was very curious on what exactly stung me.

    Posted by Jessi Culbertson

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