Posts Tagged ‘Jessica’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

A Goodbye Present!

April 25th, 2013

Interns Jamie and Jessica finished their work with us last week and gave us a goodbye present.

Jamie, on the left crying, painted the picture for us that Jessica is holding.

 

We were happy and impressed with our present:

Sarah, Kimberly, and Jessi (L-R)

We’ll miss Jamie and Jessica and wish them well at their summer internship sites (Jessica is heading to the Western NC Nature Center in Asheville and Jamie is heading to the Knoxville Zoo).

Join the conversation:

  1. So sweet! I’m going to miss those ladies.

    Posted by Leslie
  2. Miss you all bunches, I cant wait to come back and visit!!

    Posted by Jamie Gray

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Zookeeper or Hair Stylist?

April 5th, 2013

Our current interns have been mentioned a few times. One of my favorite things about having interns is when they have been here awhile and really relax and let you see who they really are. (actually I think these two were relaxed from day 1)

I walked into the office the other day and witnessed this…

Jessica Intern

Wait for it…

Jamie Intern is quite proud of herself!

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Intern Update

March 22nd, 2013

Jessica (with Salt the chinchilla) and Jamie (with Dixie the ferret)

 

Our interns, Jamie and Jessica, have less than 4 weeks left in their semester with us. I can’t believe their time is ending. They’ve finished their training with our education animals and can now work in the rooms on their own.

They’ve been doing great and we’re happy to have them here.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Intern Enrichment Project

February 21st, 2013

Our Interns, Jessica and Jamie, have started their enrichment project. They are interning with us Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays they take classes. for one of their classes they have to do an enrichment project for an animal. They decided to work with Henry, our woodchuck, to see if they could get him more active. We’ll report back (if you want) later in the semester to see what they learned, but in the meantime, here are some photos of what they built and their first day of watching Henry with their item:

Jamie ties on the whiffle balls

 

Ready to go

 

 

Henry watches from his bed at first

Jamie and Jessica take notes diligently hoping for some interaction.

Henry approaches

Henry engages

FYI- I went back and checked and only one of the whiffle balls is still hanging up. Seems like he’s been having some fun.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPic: Meet our Interns Jamie & Jessica

February 6th, 2013

We’re fortunate again to have two wonderful interns from Davidson County Community College with us this semester. Jamie (on the left) and Jessica are in their first year in the Zoo and Aquarium Science program. They’ll be with us until mid-April. Say hi if you see them around.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Spotlight: Jessica Culbertson

November 30th, 2012

Happy 6-month anniversary Jessi! She’s  made it through probation and working her first closed holiday. Jessi is the first Keeper at the Museum who went to school to specifically be a zoo keeper. She also interned with us in spring 2011- read about her from way back then, back when she was a tattoo-less student intern (or at least much-less-tattooed).

She’s quite, thoughtful, diligent, and quite tough. I think she carries three pocket knives on her belt (I haven’t quite figured that one out yet. Can Vegans carry three knives at a time?)
 
Here’s what her co-workers have to say about her (at least what I can share on the Blog):
 
She’s a super fast learner. Loyal and direct- she’s not about gossiping or bu##sh*t. She’s got a great sense of humor. A wine connoisseur.  She has a great memory, and cannot stand the color pink.
 

Jessi diligently writing notes

When I have done training with her she has never hesitated once to ask me to check a lock or question my actions (sometimes as part of training I purposefully forget to do something to see what my trainee will do). Never. Very few people have always spoken up. Speaking truth to power is a mighty respectable trait!
 
 

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  1. Hooray Jessi, way to be awesome!

    Posted by Leslie
  2. I am very proud of my little girl.

    Posted by Cherie

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

In Memory of J. Pos

October 3rd, 2011
 
I’m sorry to report that Jessica Opossum passed away last week
 
Jessica Opossum enjoying her enrichment

Jessica was one of our Education Holding Room animals, she got to educate many school and birthday party children during her time here with us.  Earlier this year our other female opossum Cher also passed away, opossums have a very short life span often living no longer than 3 years.

 

Look at that hand!

 
Click here to see Jill and baby Jessica dancing
 
 

We still have our big boy Sonny 

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  1. Keeper Comment :

    We update several times a week Jacklyn so keep coming back to read more!

    Posted by Kimberly Lawson

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

Animals at the Museum…that aren’t ours!

July 14th, 2011

So on any given day you can come to the museum and see all kinds of fun things.  The exhibits, the fun and wonderful staff, and of course the animals in their habitats.  But once in a while you get a treat. You see the museum is on a good bit of wooded land and has a healthy population of wildlife living on it’s grounds as well.  So sometimes we’re lucky enough to run into all kinds of fun animals that we work around every day and don’t always see.  Especially on those days when we come in extra early, or leave extra late – when the crowds aren’t too plentiful is when we especially get to encounter some fun wild critters. 

Look at the side of her shell- see the old injury in the middle?

A few weeks ago, all of the keeper staff came in extra early to help catch the wolves so we could spray the yard for ticks, and get them vet-checked, as well as some other big maintenance like cleaning the pool and mowing as long as we were at it.  On the way down to the wolf yard we came across a big female yellow bellied slider right in the middle of the path.  I got out of the back of Sherry’s truck to move her over and it was Chip, a turtle who if the story serves true, was hit by the museum train many years back and now has a distinctly scarred shell from the encounter.  All the keepers said a cheerful (or as much as they can muster at 7am) “Good Morning” and we send her on her way out of the trucks path. 

Somebody just doesn't like museum paparazzi!

Slightly later on that morning after the wolf yard had been taken care of and most of us had been de-ticked (Marilyn usually has a complement of three times the normal human capacity) when Aaron and I were mucking around Explore the Wild, we came upon a young black rat snake sunning itself on the path.  I say young because even though it was a small adult size, it still had faint remnants of it’s juvenile blotched coloration.  It was decidedly unhappy to see us, which I will attribute to Aaron’s singing.  :)

Already this summer we’ve found a number a copperheads on grounds.  Everything from last year’s birth to a decently hefty female looking for a meal over by our compost pile in the back area.  These snakes are very pretty, but also are dangerous because of the fact that they are venomous so when we find one we relocate it to an unpopulated area to ensure the safety of both our guests and the snake.

Pretty but dangerous... I've had dates like that :)

Agkistrodon contortrix - The Copperhead

Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) - A cute way to start the day!

There’s so many animals to be found on the museum grounds that you could spend weeks trying to find them all.  Any given day you might see woodchucks eating and hanging out at any given place in the park.  I had a Gray Tree Frog keep me company as I cleaned at Lemurs the other day.

Our Intern Jessica with a baby slider she rescued from the dangerous human path in front of wolves

And it's off to the swamp with him!

You might even be in early one day to start cleaning the animals and a random creature from the night before left you a present on the path to step over and try to identify.  :)  All in all, it’s always nice to be surrounded by nature, especially in the heart of Durham.  The best part is, you never know what you’re going to find.

The Museum version of a mermaid... minus the singing Animals :)

Join the conversation:

  1. Director Comment :

    I’ve seen a bunch of wild mammals on grounds over the years: fox (and kits too), muskrat, beaver (with babies), deer, and an otter.

    Maybe you can get photos of all our groundhogs!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  2. Is that copperhead in the second picture trying to strike? And how do you go about safely relocating them?

    As an aside, children’s author Roald Dahl (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) wrote a couple of fabulous memoirs about his childhood and young adulthood. In the second one (Going Solo), there’s a chapter about catching a green mamba in Africa (by a professional snake catcher, not Dahl, who felt the same way about snakes as I do!). It’s a great read for those who are interested in snakes, although not the NC variety.

    Posted by Libby

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

New species at the Museum…

March 6th, 2011

So, being a “Life and Science” Museum not only do we have the pleasure of having our own animal collection that we get to work (and play) with, but we also have the added bonus of a large outdoor campus with all kinds of fun wildlife as well.  Sometimes we get to see groundhogs, sometimes snakes, and once in a while a brand new species wanders into out midst that completely blows our minds.  This weekend, it happened again.  We were visited by a species previously unknown to science.  And now, my readers is the first ever account of it anywhere.  It is my glad pleasure to acquaint you with the “Pegaphant”.  This unique species combines both the characteristics of a normal elephant and the mythological Pegasus from ancient lore.  It truly is a masterpiece of evolution.  Or is it…?

The Pegaphant!

Latin name: Pegaloxodonta caseyjessicus

The true story behind the Pegaphant, is actually that of well meaning, and enrichment for our animals.  Every so often one of our enrichment tasks is to make up a fake sheep out of cardboard, wool, and anything else fun that our animals may enjoy.  These will be introduced in with the bears or the wolves to play with, eat and destroy as they see fit.  They may have treats added to them, real hair or wool, and possibly even scent sprayed on to increase just how interesting the fake sheep would seem to our critters.  Generally they do not last very long.

As for the Pegaphant, it all started with that noble and well-intentioned idea.  Little did we know that in the wrong hands, that power could turn so terribly for the worse…  You see the Animal Dept currently has two interns.  Casey and Jessica.  Who have been nothing but wonderful, helpful and so sweet you might need an insulin shot.  They love the animals and are great at their jobs.  Who would’ve known they were actually evil genetic scientists in disguise?  When asked to tackle the “fake sheep” project, none of us thought to question their abilities or motives.  It was only when it was too late that we realized the tradgedy that had befallen the genetic community.  It seems that either our interns are exceptionally skilled animal keepers and able to bypass the species barrier and successfully breed and elephant and a Pegasus, OR (and this is my opinion) they are in truth completely mad genetic scientists with a more dangerous plan than the original Jurassic Park had.  And sadly, with less Dinosaurs.

Casey & Jessica

From what I can gather from the photos of the Pegaphant, it was sired from an African elephant. Notice the large ears and robust trunk with bristling at the tip.  These are definitely traits of the African variety as opposed to the Asian elephant which has smaller ears and a trunk tip with one “finger-like” tip as opposed to two in the Africans.  As for the other half of it’s genetic parentage, it most likely is comprised from a classic Greek Pegasus, as opposed to the winged Unicorn of fantasy lore that it is sometimes confused with.  This delineation is easily seen from a lack of horn in our specimen, and also in the stockier stature which the classic Pegasus possesses being a fierce fighter and adversary in Greek mythology.

All great artists sign their work (Even Villainous mad geneticists) :)

The Pegaphant was destined to be introduced in with the bears and may have put up a worthy fight.  But ultimately, it’s destiny was sealed and the only one of it’s kind was no more.  I’m sure that our evil geneticists will be hard at work developing new species to impress and terrify us.  It’ll be like a demented Wuzzles episode over here in the near future.    :)

Flashback time! Can you name all the Wuzzles?

Join the conversation:

  1. Director Comment :

    See a video (from 3 years ago) of wolf #1390 “engaging” with an earlier version of the Pegaphant:
    http://blogs.lifeandscience.org/keepers/2007/12/11/creature-feature-red-wolf-1390/

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Opossum ballet

January 26th, 2011

Lots of times when Keeper Marilyn and I are together we like to reminisce about the good ole days.  You may catch us singing a tune from New Kids on the Block together and performing their fantastic dance moves.  Until someone can actually get that on film you will just have to close your eyes and imagine.

However,the animal department did catch me performing my own dance moves in our quarantine room when Jessica Opossum first came to us.

Holding onto an opossum and making sure she is secure is almost an impossible task to perform solo.

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  1. I think we should submit this to ADF! You two look so graceful. :-)

    Posted by Leslie

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