Posts Tagged ‘lemurs’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

New additions… lemurs are here

July 31st, 2014

We have 5 new ring-tailed lemurs residing behind the scenes.We’ll introduce you to them over the blog in the next few weeks and you’ll be able to see them at the lemur exhibit indoor viewing area soon after that. For now,  photos of them in the van  (I drove them here from the Toledo Zoo on Saturday).

Van loaded with my five new friends as their Keepers send them off with smiles

Van loaded with my five new friends as their Keepers send them off with smiles

 

My daughter Mir, thrilled to be in the van for 11 hours with our  5 new friends

My daughter Mir, thrilled to be in the van for 11 hours with our 5 new friends

And a sneak peak of them out of the van:

 toledo

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Crazy Weather

April 28th, 2014

So far, Spring has provided us with some very crazy weather.  One day it is 70 degrees with a nice breeze then a cold and rainy day the next.  Mid-march brought us some icy conditions  then recently we had a hail storm pass through.

ICY ETW

We make sure that we are constantly looking at the weather so that we can make sure to prepare the animal areas for whatever weather that is coming our way.  Which includes keeping heat lamps up at lemurs for the extra cold nights to providing the bears with ice treats when it gets really hot.

Sunny ETW

But when it is really nice, the bears take advantage of the situation by finding a nice spot to sun.

VA sunning

 

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  1. I especially love that bear picture!

    Posted by Wendy

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Disturbing news for lemur conservation

March 3rd, 2014

The American Association for the Advancement of Science reported troubling news for lemurs in the February 21 issue of their Science Magazine. The report states that lemurs the most imperiled
group of large vertebrates.

Read the full article: Schwitzer et al 2014_Science-Averting Lemur Extinctions.

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Where are the Ring-Tailed Lemurs?

January 30th, 2014

It has been cold lately and that means that the Ring-tailed lemurs have been inside in their indoor holding area.  Since they are inside, we want to make sure that they are getting enriched.  A recent enrichment item that we have used for the lemurs is skewering dried fruit on pumpkins or like in the following pictures on paper towel tubes.

Cassandra and Satyrus. What is this?

 

Satyrus was interested in the new item once Cassandra had inspected it first.

 

Cassandra getting an apricot.

 

Satyrus scent marking the item after eating his fill of apricots.

 

 

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  1. Glad Cassandra and Satyrus were comfy and warm. Wondering what the red square with the red x is for? Thank you.

    Posted by dj
  2. Keeper Comment :

    I can answer that, DJ.

    The red box with the X was part of a behavior the Ringtails were learning. The goal was to have them put both their hands in the box and have their back facing the keeper. It’s a harder task to train than you might think, the Ringtails always seem to keep an eye on the keeper that’s working with them and as a team, there was a lot of walking in circles. The hope was that we could then train them to stay there with their hands on the wall so we could look at their back, fur, or apply medication to their skin if we needed to.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Shocking day… and in a bad way.

August 21st, 2013

It’s horrible news to report: We found Lycus dead this morning. He was very old, but this was a shock as he had been acting as he typically does.

There’s nothing much more to say, but wanted folks to know.

 

 

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  1. RIP Lycus :(

    The lemurs are always one of our must-visit stops through the outside area of the museum.

    Posted by Rhiannon
  2. We will miss him.

    Posted by Shawntel
  3. Keeper Comment :

    :(

    Posted by Kimberly Lawson

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

lemur physicals

August 16th, 2013

This week the red ruffed lemurs got their annual physicals.

QUIZ: who’s wearing the blue gloves, who’s wearing the white gloves, and whose sneakers are showing?

All three girls- Cynthia, Iris, and Jethys-  did great. Each one, from pre-sedation to reversal took 37 minutes. We’re waiting for blood work to come back, but everyone’s initial findings seemed to be okay. Our girls are getting old so I always have concerns about what the tests will show. Cynthia is almost 32 years old. The Duke lemur center only has one red ruffed lemur older than her.

 

Annie’s job at the end was to keep each lemur warm, make sure they awoke with no issue, and then put them in their crate.

 

Annie always takes notes during the physicals and makes sure the Dr. Vanderford and Katy get everything done on the list. This year she had an added bonus of holding the lemurs at the end.

Katy was running a rectal thermometer and an ear thermometer to see if the temperatures were the same (which they were).

Hopefully all the blood work comes back okay! In September, we’ll do physicals on the ring tailed lemurs. (More pictures then.

Join the conversation:

  1. Blue gloves-Sherry
    White gloves-Katy
    Sitting in the chair- Annie

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. CORRECT!

    Posted by sherry

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

The Lemurs Meet a Mop Head

June 26th, 2013

Who doesn’t like enrichment videos??

Cereal strung up into a cotton mop head is one of my favorite enrichment items to watch our lemurs interact with. Personally, I think stringing a whole bunch of tiny pieces of cereal onto a mop head is tedious and not at all fun, but the result is worth it. Below are a couple videos I took of the Ringtails and Red Ruffeds spending some quality time with their favorite mops.

YouTube Preview Image YouTube Preview Image

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Lemur Enrichment

June 1st, 2013

This is one of my favorite enrichment items for lemurs.  We hang these small bags on the branches and put just a few pieces of dried fruit in each one.  It’s quite cute to watch them go through the bag.  I tried to get a picture of each of our 6 lemurs using their enrichment.

Lycus

Satyrus

Cassandra

Cynthia

Iris

 

Here’s my favorite, Iris photo-bombing Jethys picture

 

 

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  1. I like the Cynthia no hands approach.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. Cynthia’s going head deep LOL

    Posted by Funny Monkey

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Lemur Training Update

March 7th, 2013

 

The red ruffed lemurs have been off exhibit since December. We have just a couple of weeks left until it is warm enough for the ring tailed lemurs to be outside during the day and the red ruffed lemurs to move upstairs, on exhibit. Here is where we were last time I updated about training- click here.

While our focus was going to be crate training we also added the behavior of station. Station is a way to 1) separate the lemurs if necessary 2) keep a lemur in one spot while working with the others.  The red ruffed have access to three stalls. In each stall we have a shelf attached to the door. These shelves are where we would like the lemurs to ‘station’. But how do they know which one of them should station on which shelf? Great questions- we hang up symbols on the doors, above the shelves. Each lemur has their own specific symbol. Stationing is going great!

Crate training is also going well. The door has been shut on Cynthia and we’re very close to shutting the door on Jethys and Iris.

The ring tailed lemurs are still doing great with their crate training. Dr English will visit in the next few months and our oldest lemurs Lycus (almost 28) and Cynthia (almost 32) will have to be crated and brought to the building to get their eyes checked out.

 

Jethys symbol for station is a star

Iris’ symbol for station is a moon

Cynthia symbol for station is a diamond

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Largest living lemur

October 31st, 2012

Back when people first explored Madagascar there was a 400 lb lemur the size of a gorilla! Unfortunately, due to hunting this species was quickly wiped out. Today the largest living lemur is the Indri.

Indri Lemur

 

This lemur is two and a half feet in length and typically weighs 13-15 lbs. It’s a diurnal lemur that feeds on canopy fruit and leaves and travels through the tree tops, often leaping 30 feet between tree trunks! They are known for their very distinct songs and sounds. These songs can be heard over a mile away and can last up to 3 minutes at a time.

They live in small family groups of 2-6 individuals. Indri lemurs typically live to be 15-18 years old but can live into their 20′s.

Their reproduction is quite different than other lemurs. Reaching sexual maturity later in life, around ages 7 to 9, as well as having offspring only every 2-3 years equals a low birth rate. With it’s population already low, habitat loss and hunting only add to the dwindling numbers of Indri lemurs. This lemur is very hard to keep in captivity which makes breeding programs hard to come by. This lemur is listed as Endangered.

 

 

Indri Lemur

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