Posts Tagged ‘Mikey’

by , Volunteer
I like volunteering to work with the animals and the Keepers (both are quite exciting and entertaining). I speak several languages including chicken. In another life I teach physics, but mostly I just love to learn (anything!) and be outdoors. When not volunteering I like to watch the bears and photograph around Explore the Wild. Follow me on Twitter @ktraphagen

Phoebe: Our tail-wagging Alligator

November 11th, 2011

Phoebe, our new education alligator, is downright cute. When Mikey holds her and strokes her neck, she wags her tail! Don’t believe me? Watch the video!
YouTube Preview Image

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  1. Hello,

    My name is Bradley Collins and I am interested in the animal care volunteer position. I would like more information about the requirements and details of this volunteer job.

    Thanks,
    Bradley Collins

    Posted by Bradley Collins
  2. Director Comment :

    Hi Bradley.
    You can learn about volunteering on our website: http://www.ncmls.org/get-involved/volunteer
    Thanks for inquiring.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

QuikPost: Mikey’s desk is clean!!

November 7th, 2011

Being that we are animal keepers, you can probably imagine we spend far more time cleaning our animals’ spaces than we do cleaning our own. At work our space is the Animal Department office, and you can see from the picture below that it is a bit disheveled! However, you also have to keep in mind that there are six of us who share a space that is approximately 10 feet by 18 feet in size!

Believe it or not, there is actually order to this chaos...

Some of the keepers’ desks tend to stay a bit tidier than others, and since all of our desks are really just one long desk split six ways, it’s a fact of life that we just have to accept how tidy (or untidy) our neighbors decide to be.

Today I walked into the office, and Mikey proudly pointed out that he had actually cleaned his desk! I was astonished and told him it was worthy of a blog post. :) (That smiley is for you Mikey…)  Now, if we can only convince his NEIGHBOR to clean HER desk (ahem, Jill) that will be the blog post of the year!!

Mikey's desk nice and clean! (He rewarded himself with a piece of candy!)

 

Aaaand Jill's desk next to Mikey's. But as long as it makes sense to Jill, that's all that matters!

 

 

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  1. Jill’s desk looked tidier than normal today- I guess that’s clean for her

    Posted by Kimberly

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

Meet the new Kid!

November 4th, 2011

Hey there fun bunch!  Welcome back!  It is my great pleasure to introduce you to our very newest education animal.  Her name is Phoebe, and she is our new baby education alligator. 

Close up on the pretty girl!

You can meet her during programs by our wonderful education staff, and also sometimes at the end of our Thursday public Reptile Feeding programs which begin at 4pm.  She is only a few months old and quite adorable.  She got her name after a variety of good suggestions were thrown out and then voted upon.  But what she was named after is even cooler…

Looks like lunch to me!We call her Phoebe, as a nickname…She was named after Phobosuchus, the giant prehistoric crocodilian of the Cretaceous period that lived in North Carolina around 70 million years ago, and could attain lengths of 40 feet or more.  These behemoths dwelled in the warm seas of the time preying on anything they could overpower, including dinosaurs!  The name Phobosuchus (pronounced  Fo-bow-sook-us) actually means “terrible crocodile”.  It had a 6 foot skull, and teeth that were 4 inches long.  And even though it lived at the same time, this crocodile was not a dinosaur, but a prehistoric reptile.  Another name synonymous with this animal is Deinosuchus.  Studies of fossilized skull fragments indicate that this animal was more closely related to alligators than modern day crocodiles.  It had a broader snout and was made for crushing its prey.  It’s bite was probably even more powerful than the big therapod dinosaurs of it’s time, like Tyrannosaurus Rex! 

So now that you know a little more about her background, be sure to come out and visit our newest little squirt during a program sometime!  She’s cute, she’s adorable, but sadly she won’t be getting 40 feet long or eating dinosaurs anytime soon…  :)

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

Don’t Let Them Go! (Part 3)

October 5th, 2011

Okay, here we go again!  Now it’s time for some species specifics on a few of the more common released pets that can turn into invasive species.  You’ve probably seen or even had some of these animals sometime as they’re pretty common in the pet trade.  This is Part 3 kiddos, so if you want a recap of our earlier fun click here for Part 1 or Part 2.  Or click here just because it has nothing to do with anything.  :)

 

Red Eared Slider turtles are one of the most common reptile pets on the market today.  Actually, it is against the law to sell a turtle with a shell length of less than 4″, except for educational or research purposes.  This is unfortunately not a heavily enforced law, as I see droves of baby turtles sold in shops by the beaches.  In NC it is illegal to buy or sell any size and species of turtle or tortoise, though you may have as many as you wish.  But I cannot even count the number of people who go to Myrtle Beach SC for the weekend and come back with a baby slider or two.  Never a good idea.

A hatchling and an adult. Talk about a big change!

The males get about an 8″ shell length, the females can get to over a foot long.  Too large for most general pet keepers.  The old wives’ tale of keeping it in a smaller tank so it won’t grow is a horrible fallacy.  True, it won’t grow to it’s full potential, but the poor animal is being stunted and will develop bone and growth issues and have a very shortened life because of it.  It will generally get just a bit too big for it’s container and then become completely stunted.  These turtles need plenty of room to swim and move, with UV lighting or natural sunlight (many people do not want to pay for the expensive UV bulbs, and so more health problems arise).  They also are a messy species and eat a variety of foods as well as necessitating vitamins to grow their shells and bones properly.  The little turtle that was bought for $5 at the beach can become an undertaking of many hundreds of dollars throughout it’s life.

Little...

Green Iguanas are a huge handful to have to deal with, and many years ago when they were very expensive and uncommon it was not a huge problem.  But over the past decade and a half, their prices have dropped significantly and now there are baby iguanas everywhere for less then $20.  Some places even have the horrible practice of giving them away as prizes at carnival games.  I would venture a guess that at least 90% of these baby iguanas perish terribly before they are even out of the juvenile stage.  If not, then many more will have various bone diseases and other afflictions due to the specialized dietary needs and other care necessities that this species requires to grow to a large and healthy size and that most general pet keepers are remiss in providing.  A common green iguana can get to 6 feet long, are arboreal (tree climbing) in nature and are for the most part vegetarian.  They need a wide array of vegetables, fruits, leafy greens and vitamin supplements, as well as high exposure to UV lighting and a hot basking spot.  Plus a whole lot of room to move and grow in.  If handled properly they can become a fairly docile pet, but sometimes the males as they attain a larger size and sexual maturity can become aggressive.  They are attempting to be the dominant animal and will turn on humans and iguanas alike to attain that.  Once iguanas pass about 3 feet long, many owners start looking for a new home for them.

...to very very BIG!!

These animals are only going to continue to grow, and most zoos, pet store and rescue organizations are already glutted with unwanted pets.  So the desperate owner unfortunately will turn to an easy option and one which most people mistakenly talk themselves into thinking is the best thing for the animal and that’s releasing it.  This is a huge problem with iguanas, as any climate colder than Florida will kill them, and if they are in Florida they have become an established and invasive species which breeds readily, and are now occupying a good bit of the tropical habitats in the state.  Many times alongside humans.  They live in parks, wooded areas in cities, and I have even seen them in dense numbers at an RV park along a canal where they would run and dive into the water to swim away if approached by humans or any other threats.

 

 

 

A good number of exotic tropical fish are also on the list of problem species that get dumped into the waterways when they inevitably outgrow their tanks.  Some people can handle very large fish in their homes, most cannot.  Yet still they buy them anyway because they’re “cool”, or they want to watch them eat other fish or a whole other host of bad reasons.  Oscars are a large South American fish from the cichlid family.  They are very attractive fish, kind of a bully and will swallow anything they get their mouth around.  Oh, and they get about the size of my boot.  I’m a size 12, so a pretty decent size fish.

Black Pacu (Colossoma macropomum) get absolutley HUGE!

 

 

Pacus are related to Piranhas (although primarily a plant eater in nature) but get to a diameter reminiscent of a small car tire.  Lionfish are a saltwater species who possess venomous spines and a voracious appetite and have practically no natural predators along our coastline where they are occurring more and more frequently.

Lionfish (Pterois volitans) has sharpened fin spines which contain a potent venom. Which ensures no one wants to eat it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And of course Snakeheads.  These fish were brought in not only for the pet trade, but also for the food industry.  They are considered a delicacy in Asia.  Most species can get at least a meter long, have a large toothy mouth, will eat anything they can overpower and can move across wet land and gulp air to find and colonize new bodies of water.  So once everything in an area is eaten, it’s on to the next place.  And once a breeding population is established, they can spread out from there and quickly decimate an entire ecosystem.

These are just a few of the species that were commonly kept and have ended up running amuck in various parts of the South Eastern wilderness or waterways.  If you happen to have one or are contemplating obtaining one, do your best to keep it it’s entire life because that’s what responsible owners do.  If for some reason you are unable to, find it a good home somewhere and don’t let it loose.  You never know, one day we might be overrun with a new complement of species that really become a problem.  Honestly people, if we’re going to be overrun with things, at least make it something worthwhile.  Like Anne Hathaway (Helloooooo Nurse!)  :)

 

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  1. If people are interested in obtaining a turtle there are many organizations out there that work with adoption and rescue of these species. However, I STRONGLY urge people to do tons of research because like Mikey stated, they cost a huge amount of money and time to keep. Their diets are diverse and there is vet upkeep as well.

    Posted by Jill
  2. They are so cute when they are baby hope mine doesnt grow that big

    Posted by Stephanie Avila

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

Don’t Let Them Go! (Part 2)

September 13th, 2011

Hello and welcome back to the Wonderful World of Mikey!  (Formerly Mikey-vision, but budget cuts forced me to adopt a used and cheaper name to copyright infringe upon)  :)  This is the second installment of a post (click here for the first part) I had started where we talked about various exotic pets and the very bad practice of letting them go when they were no longer wanted or able to be cared for.  We had talked about the many issues with this, including the fact that if the animal(s) did not perish from their inability to survive in the wild, then they might do just the opposite and flourish.  The flourishing, while good for the individuals released, is usually a bad thing for the native species and environment around them.  Because it’s then that these animals are given a negative branding.  They are now considered “Invasive Species” (ominous music here…)

Walking Catfish can survive out of water for extended periods and move across land looking for new places to call home

African Rock Pythons are the 3rd largest snake in the world, and generally come with bad temperments. Large individuals can definitely present a danger to humans.

Invasive species in general terms are an exotic species, either to the immediate region or the wider area as a whole (country, state, etc.) which has been introduced (possibly inadvertently or on purpose) and taken to the new environment well.  Their new home might be something like where the species had evolved originally to survive, or it may have been modified (usually by humans) to be even more conducive to their survival.  If enough individuals are in an area, breeding will occur and the population may take hold in a new region.  They will quite possibly push the native species out by out competing for food, shelter sites, or even predation.  And in some rare species they will present a possible danger to humans.

Invasive species can come into a new habitat through a variety of ways, but for the interest of this article I’m going to concentrate on the abandoned and released pet method.  I’m doubting any of you will be piloting a super tanker up a river and dropping ballast water full of non-native marine life, or importing things from other countries for intentional release.  So for now, we’re going to stick to pets that probably shouldn’t have been bought in the first place.  And there are so many that have begun to colonize the wild due to releases.  Many of them are in the Southeast region due to the near tropical conditions and abundant habitats.

Here’s a short list:

Green Iguana. A common pet which most people cannot handle for it's full life.

Red-Eared Sliders

Burmese Pythons

African Rock Pythons

Nile Monitors

Quaker Parrots

Walking Catfish

Central & South American Cichlid fish (Oscars, Tilapia, etc)

Green Iguanas

Various Gecko Species

African Clawed Frog

Cuban Treefrog

African Clawed Frogs are actually illegal to sell now in many parts of the Southeast due to possible colonization ability

Lionfish

Snakeheads

Marine/Cane Toads

Spectacled Caiman

 

Quaker parrots can be found in many places in Florida, but also in New York as well!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okay my enlightened pals, that’s enough for now – We’ll get into a few species specifics on a few of the more commonly released critters that have taken hold in the next posting.  Try and keep your chin up and not miss me too much – I’ll be back soon with all kinds of more fun stuff!  See you in Part 3!  :)

 

 

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

Don’t Let Them Go!

September 5th, 2011

Burmese Python (Python molurus bivittatus)

Okay guys and dolls, it’s time to wrap your minds around a bit of a concept that can seem like a good idea at the time, but can later have very negative effects.  No, I’m not talking about dating your second cousin, I’m talking about what to do with your unwanted pets.  So many people get something little and cute and it seems great at the time, but then it keeps growing, or gets to be alot of work or expensive or they just plain get tired of it.  And they decide to get rid of it.  There’s a number of venues that people will utilize to relocate their unwanted pets.  Some find them good new homes, some try to return them to the store or sell them.  But for the purposes of this post, we’re going to concentrate on a common and very not good route that a good number of people take.  They let their animals go.  Out the back door, into the woods, at a pond or whatever.  They think a return to the wild is a humane or beneficial thing to do, but they are very sadly mistaken.

 

 

There are a number of reasons why this is a bad idea.  The first is of course a cruelty issue.  Sad to say, but the great majority of released pets will die upon their return to the wild.  Either picked off by predators, hit by cars, or simply starving to death.  It may be quick or it may be a long slow process, but most pets who have been captive bred haven’t the faintest clue how to survive on their own in the wild, and even wild caught ones are going to have a difficult time in a new environment, with new food and un-ideal conditions.  When animals are used to free food, care and shelter living and fending for themselves in the wild is almost always too much.

Most people get Red Eared Sliders as adorable hatchlings... but then they grow...

 

 

Red Eared Sliders are one of the most commonly released unwanted pets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The other option is that the animal doesn’t die, and is somehow dumped into an environment that is actually suitable for it.  It may actually be able to find food, shelter and possibly even thrive.  The problem with this is that if there are others of it’s kind, it will mate and begin to colonize this new area and the chance is there for it to create a bit of an ecological disaster.  It could be destroying the habitat around it, pose a threat to plants or crops in the area, or even start taking over and pushing out the native wildlife.  There are a number of pet species that have found their release sites to be preferential to even where they might have lived in the wild since there are less to no predators, plentiful food and simply a very conducive environment.  A few of these outcompete the natives and slowly take over the new habitat, through breeding or even hybridization.  Some are so large and aggressive, that they pose a real threat to all other animals and even people.  So in this case, they have moved from being abandoned & doomed pets to being Invasive Species.  More on that in part two of this post…

Snakeheads are one of the most adaptable and dangerous species to ever introduce into an aquatic environment

 

Snakeheads are NOT good to kiss!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So tune in next time Bat-fans! Same Mikey time, Same Mikey channel!  And I’ll talk more about some of the dumped pets that have turned into Invasive Species.  Like Sliders, pythons and Monitors, oh my!  Exotic tropical fish, birds and possibly even heffalumps and woozles…who are VERY confuseled… :)  See you next time my friends!

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  1. Great post as usual–and btw, are y’all allowed to share about the snakes the Durham police asked you to babysit for them?

    Posted by Libby

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

Come to the Dark Side…We have cookies

August 19th, 2011

And so it just goes to show you what happens when an unsuspecting and seemingly innocent person leaves an opening for a little bit of evil to happen.  Sometimes it’s a computer left logged in, sometimes it’s a routine write up left open to be modified.  And in this case, it was a locker left casually ajar…  All I can say is Mwah ha ha! 

In all fairness, much worse stuff could have been loaded into the locker…

To be fair, this is when Aaron had first started, and of course we wanted to make sure he felt welcomed and accepted  :)

 

See? It's a sign of acceptance into our herd, pride, pod, gaggle... whatever...

 

 

Ah, that silly Aaron! Keeping bowling pins in his locker! Will he never learn?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just in case one was hiding still…
This little bit of evil brought to you by the Letter E, the Number 6, and the Keepers Mikey & Jill.  Until next time kids, keep working on your villainous laugh!  Mwah ha ha!  :)
 

Nothing makes the day like a happy Aaron!

 

 

 

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  1. Director Comment :

    Readers: any guesses why we have so many bowling pins?

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  2. Because we have large lockers to fill!

    Posted by Mikey
  3. Aren’t they just spares?

    Posted by Natalie

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.
Tags: , ,

The Need for Speed… and Rhinos…

July 25th, 2011

Okay Sports fans, here it is.  Another great opportunity to come out and support your local most favoritest Zookeepers and have a blast at the same time.  Up and coming on the 29th of July keepers from the Museum, as well as Carolina Tiger Rescue and the Duke Lemur Center will be having a fundraiser to benefit Bowling for Rhinos a great organization that raises money every year to help save Rhinos and their habitats.  What kind of fundraiser, you ask?  Could it be bowling?  No!  Could it be selling Rhino Scout cookies? No!  This year, your local AAZK (American Association of Zookeepers) has slightly modified it into Racing for Rhinos!  That’s right my speed racing friends!  We’re going Go-Karting to raise money.  Oh the fun!

racing for rhinos flier – Click the link for a look at our snazzy flier!

Come and save cute baby rhinos!

We’ll be going to Rush Hour Karting on July 29th.  For every race that they sell between 7pm – 9 pm, half of the proceeds will be donated to your local chapter of the AAZK which we will then be donating to help save wild Rhinos.  It’s going to be a great night of fun, food and Racing!  Did I mention, the Karts go really fast?  Cause they do!  :)

The address of Rush Hour Karting is 5335 Raynor Rd, Garner, NC 27529.  For more info, click here and it will take you to the Events section of our AAZK webpage.  Hope to see you there!  It’s going to be a blast!  Bring yourself, or some friends, (or a calzone for me) but come down and have a great time with us.  And save some Rhinos!  :)

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.
Tags: ,

Phun with Fobias!

July 22nd, 2011

Have you ever walked around a zoo or museum and heard people say things like “Snakes! I hate snakes!” or “I won’t walk that way if there’s a spider there!”.  Many people (some studies indicate around 1 in 10 people) have a phobia at some point or another in their life.  A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder, usually defined as a persistent fear of an object or situation in which the sufferer commits to great lengths in avoiding despite the fear, typically disproportional to the actual danger posed.  The sufferer usually is aware that the fear is irrational, but can do nothing about it. 

There are many types of phobias ranging from fear of clowns, to a fear of bad breath and everything in between.  Once in a while we meet someone here at the museum who has a particular problem with certain animals.  We try to educate and help the person through their fear and with any luck we can make a small difference to them.  Animal phobias are very common and can be quite debilitating to those people who suffer from them. Especially if the animal they fear is a very commonplace one, like dogs.  Here are some of the phobias that might show themselves at our facility…

 

 

 

 

Bovinophobia - fear of cattle                                                                         

Equinophobia/Hippophobia – fear of horses

Icthyophobia – fear of fish

Herpetophobia – fear of reptiles and amphibians

Ophidiophobia – fear of snakes

Ornithophobia – fear of birds

Entomophobia – fear of insects

Arachnophobia – fear of spiders

Cynophobia – fear of canines

Mainouphobia/Pithikosophobia – fear of monkeys(& Lemurs!)

Ovinaphobia -fear of sheep

Beware the cute and fluffy!

And that’s just some of the possible animal phobias.  There’s tons more out there, from the smallest insect to the largest whale.  Some are common, some are incredibly obscure.  But all are real and afflict someone, somewhere.

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by , Keeper
Hiya! I'm Mikey. That's all you get. :)
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you can usually find me training the bears, mucking with the reptiles and saying bad words in Italian to the aquatic filter systems.

Animals at the Museum…that aren’t ours!

July 14th, 2011

So on any given day you can come to the museum and see all kinds of fun things.  The exhibits, the fun and wonderful staff, and of course the animals in their habitats.  But once in a while you get a treat. You see the museum is on a good bit of wooded land and has a healthy population of wildlife living on it’s grounds as well.  So sometimes we’re lucky enough to run into all kinds of fun animals that we work around every day and don’t always see.  Especially on those days when we come in extra early, or leave extra late – when the crowds aren’t too plentiful is when we especially get to encounter some fun wild critters. 

Look at the side of her shell- see the old injury in the middle?

A few weeks ago, all of the keeper staff came in extra early to help catch the wolves so we could spray the yard for ticks, and get them vet-checked, as well as some other big maintenance like cleaning the pool and mowing as long as we were at it.  On the way down to the wolf yard we came across a big female yellow bellied slider right in the middle of the path.  I got out of the back of Sherry’s truck to move her over and it was Chip, a turtle who if the story serves true, was hit by the museum train many years back and now has a distinctly scarred shell from the encounter.  All the keepers said a cheerful (or as much as they can muster at 7am) “Good Morning” and we send her on her way out of the trucks path. 

Somebody just doesn't like museum paparazzi!

Slightly later on that morning after the wolf yard had been taken care of and most of us had been de-ticked (Marilyn usually has a complement of three times the normal human capacity) when Aaron and I were mucking around Explore the Wild, we came upon a young black rat snake sunning itself on the path.  I say young because even though it was a small adult size, it still had faint remnants of it’s juvenile blotched coloration.  It was decidedly unhappy to see us, which I will attribute to Aaron’s singing.  :)

Already this summer we’ve found a number a copperheads on grounds.  Everything from last year’s birth to a decently hefty female looking for a meal over by our compost pile in the back area.  These snakes are very pretty, but also are dangerous because of the fact that they are venomous so when we find one we relocate it to an unpopulated area to ensure the safety of both our guests and the snake.

Pretty but dangerous... I've had dates like that :)

Agkistrodon contortrix - The Copperhead

Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) - A cute way to start the day!

There’s so many animals to be found on the museum grounds that you could spend weeks trying to find them all.  Any given day you might see woodchucks eating and hanging out at any given place in the park.  I had a Gray Tree Frog keep me company as I cleaned at Lemurs the other day.

Our Intern Jessica with a baby slider she rescued from the dangerous human path in front of wolves

And it's off to the swamp with him!

You might even be in early one day to start cleaning the animals and a random creature from the night before left you a present on the path to step over and try to identify.  :)  All in all, it’s always nice to be surrounded by nature, especially in the heart of Durham.  The best part is, you never know what you’re going to find.

The Museum version of a mermaid... minus the singing Animals :)

Join the conversation:

  1. Director Comment :

    I’ve seen a bunch of wild mammals on grounds over the years: fox (and kits too), muskrat, beaver (with babies), deer, and an otter.

    Maybe you can get photos of all our groundhogs!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  2. Is that copperhead in the second picture trying to strike? And how do you go about safely relocating them?

    As an aside, children’s author Roald Dahl (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) wrote a couple of fabulous memoirs about his childhood and young adulthood. In the second one (Going Solo), there’s a chapter about catching a green mamba in Africa (by a professional snake catcher, not Dahl, who felt the same way about snakes as I do!). It’s a great read for those who are interested in snakes, although not the NC variety.

    Posted by Libby

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