Posts Tagged ‘miss piggy’

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

There’s a Pig on my Trailer!

August 20th, 2014

I heard some noise coming from the compost trailer when I was cleaning the pig yard. Look who had hopped inside!

Auggie checks out what Miss Piggy is doing, but quickly finds something else to do.

All done inspecting the trailer.

I think I’ve earned her approval.

Join the conversation:

  1. Love Miss Piggy’s snout of approval!!

    Posted by djcronce

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Pig Vacation

April 25th, 2014

I mentioned in the last post that the pig barn was being built. While many people seem to be longing for the pigs, I am not sure the pigs are feeling the same. They appear to be quite content in their vacation home. Some photos to document their journey

Miss Piggy in the lead as the pigs walk away from the farmyard with volunteers and keepers

Miss Piggy in the lead as the pigs walk away from the farmyard with volunteers and keepers

Auggie catches up as they enter Catch the Wind

Auggie catches up as they enter Catch the Wind

Arrival at temporary housing

Arrival at temporary housing

Miss Piggy checking out her her vacation rental... the bear house

Miss Piggy checking out her her vacation rental… the bear house

Gus checking on things from the exhibit cave

Resident checking out the vacationers from the exhibit cave

The Pigs and the Bears are doing just fine with this temporary set up. Granted, we’re not letting the bears near the pigs. Pigs get half the house and the bears get the other.

Look for the pigs back in the farmyard the first week in May.

Join the conversation:

  1. They were quite content last night when I put them to bed.
    The progress of the house is going nicely too!

    Posted by Jill

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Christmas 2011

December 26th, 2011

A fairly uneventful Christmas 2011 is over. I am delayed in getting this post up as the Blog was apparently down.

The day went like so:

my extra notes from Marilyn

I arrived at 5:15 AM.  Saturday, I asked Marilyn to “set me up well” for the day, and she did just that, along with the added instruction list. I did not know that Ladybelle Ferret “liked” warm water in her carnivore care food so that was particularly helpful to know.


I checked on the indoor animals and started to get everything ready for the day. It was very difficult to find the greenish rat snake in the dark -  he just looks like a branch. I didn’t find him initially, but later, once it was light, it was quite easy to notice the snake. (In the dark the snake is just another branch).

greenish rat snake portraying a branch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I started feeding and cleaning the Carolina Wildlife animals. Einstein’s and Galileo’s exhibit STINKS, and if they weren’t so cute while they were eating (the noises they make in particular) I quite possibly would have left. I believe I disturbed Henry’s rest, as he seemed quite agitated with me. The muskrats were easy. I actually sat in their exhibit and rearranged the sticks and spread out food all over the place. (I got some video of them eating that I’ll post a different day). 

Kit, or Kat, I cannot tell the muskrats apart.

 


 

 


 


 

I was so hot working in the building that I just had to go outside (which in turn was freezing). The heat is usually in “setback” on Christmas but our new system works great. I went outside around 6:15 with the security guard. Thank goodness Jay had his flashlight. I gave Lightning his medicine and then moved on to the lemurs to check on them. I set up the ring tailed lemurs with breakfast,  locked all the red ruffed lemurs in their holding stalls, and returned to the building around 6:50.

Our Security Guard Jay.


 

 



 

 


 

All of the lights were now kicking on inside so I checked on the animals I hadn’t seen yet (that’s when I got the above photo of the greenish rat snake). The little garter snake and exhibit box turtle were looking right at me:

 

 

 

box turtle

 

 

 

garter snake

 

 






 


Our faithful volunteers – Karyn and Donald – had graciously and thankfully offered to help. Karyn arrived around 7:00 and started to care for the Education Animals and Donald came in at 8:00 and moved to the Farmyard.

Donald and Karyn

 

After moving through items inside, we stopped in the Farmyard to check on Donald and take care of some things there. Miss Piggy decided to show me her disgusting nose. (Yes that is poop. This time of year, pumpkin-eating-time, pumpkins seem to taste good any way, and in any form,  you can get them).  Lightning decided not to be a complete jerk for hoof picking (as he was yesterday).

No Kisses for Miss Piggy

 

In Explore the Wild, we finished cleaning and feeding the lemurs, checked and fed the wolves, and the same for the bears. Yona was sleeping on the side of the cliff and wouldn’t come down. Surprisingly, Virginia did come down to eat with Gus and Mimi.

Yona and Virginia

Yona

 

 





We worked our way back to the building to finish up the morning, which ended around 11:45. I was back for an hour at the end of the day to check on and feed the animals with my assistant (she’s much older now, but I love that picture of her with long curly hair). Although tiring, it was an easy day with wonderful weather, no broken dishes, and good help. Karyn even brought me a present!

 

My new name tag.

Join the conversation:

  1. Great Job Sherry, Donald and Karen- thanks for allowing the rest of us a day off :)

    Posted by Kimberly
  2. Einstein and Galileo are opossums

    Posted by Sherry
  3. Great behind-the-scenes post, Sherry!

    Posted by Wendy

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by , Keeper
I am most famous here in the animal department for "expanding" the barred owl exhibit, clogging the wolf pool, and splitting my pants. My other less notorious work, since 2003, includes keeping, purchasing our animal supplies, coordinating our volunteers, and managing our animal enrichment program.
Find me training the lemurs or in other various animal enclosures Monday through Friday, or at the grocery store on Wednesdays, when I shop for produce!

Animal Department New Year’s Resolutions 2010 !!!

January 6th, 2010

1. Get enough sleep every night.

2. Eat more veggies!

3. Support the arts.

4. Learn a new skill.

5. Work on conquering a fear.

6. When you don’t get along with others at first, keep trying!

Join the conversation:

  1. Nice work, Kristen!

    Posted by Marilyn
  2. This is really cute! I'm so happy to see Miss Piggy and Auggie togetther at last!

    Posted by Shawntel
  3. Great job, Shum! Very cute and hilarious.

    Posted by Erin Brown
  4. These are terrific! Thanks for posting them.PS- I chuckled when I saw the Blogger "word verification" for posting this comment… it ended with "stink" (something the animals will probably never resolve to go without!)

    Posted by ktraphagen
  5. Very cute and clever!

    Posted by Elizabeth
  6. That ababy, is the CUTEST thing ive EVER seen, other than my Sammie-Boy :)

    Posted by Kelsey

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Meet your new roommate

December 28th, 2009

You may have heard about our newest addition to the farmyard, Auggie the pig. He is a cutie! Originally, he had been living elsewhere on grounds while he was in quarantine (which just means he is kept away from the other animals while we monitor him to make sure he is healthy). Once he was ready to move to his permanent home in the farmyard, it was time to introduce him to his new roommate, Miss Piggy.

We decided to record the initial meeting between Miss Piggy and Auggie. It is normal for pigs to fight when they are first introduced. They have to figure out who is going to be the “boss.” The keepers first experienced this type of difficult interaction when Miss Piggy met our last pig, Squealer. Although it was hard to watch Auggie go through the same introduction, we know from experience that it is best to just let the pigs hash it out. If we tried to separate them every time they weren’t getting along, then the fighting would escalate each time we tried to re-introduce them. However, by keeping them together and monitoring them closely for the first week, they will eventually work through the initial rivalry and eventually become companions.

Although Auggie is much smaller than Miss Piggy, he is also faster! Which means, fortunately, he did not sustain any injuries during the introduction. We are pleased to tell you that now, about 2 weeks since their introduction, they are sleeping side-by-side in their hay at night and are getting along quite well!!

You can hear some of the commentary from the video, which is an array of different keepers talking while they watch the introduction take place. All of the keepers working that day, along with Sherry and her daughter, were monitoring the pigs while they were first introduced. You may be able to hear Sherry mention the word piloerection, which is one of Larry’s “Big Words of the Month.” You can also hear Sherry say at the end of the video that Kent would need to check on them every 15 minutes while he was cleaning the farmyard that morning.

YouTube Preview Image

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by , Keeper
Although a native tarheel, I came to the museum from Texas, where I taught Biology courses at a small college. In graduate school I studied the behavior and ecology of marine organisms (mostly crabs, lobsters and sea turtles).
You can find me in the Animal Department Monday-Thursday. Fridays I work for the Department of Innovation and Learning all day.

Big Word of the Month: Piloerection

July 6th, 2009

You may have recently read about our new pig, Miss Piggy; she just moved in with our older pig, Squealer. Pig introductions don’t usually happen without at least some scuffling to establish dominance. During the introduction, both pigs displayed quite a bit of piloerection, or raised hairs.

The word piloerection comes from the Latin root pilus, which means hair. Piloerection occurs in many mammals and happens when the tiny muscles at the base of each hair follicle contract. Piloerection can happen in response to cold and the raising of the hair helps insulated the skin. In humans, this process produces “goose bumps”.

In many mammals, the response has been co-opted by natural selection to serve as a signaling mechanism. The raised neck hairs (or “hackles”) on our pigs were not a response to cold but rather a signal to the each other of heightened awareness and the threat of aggression. Our pigs are getting to know one another and we aren’t seeing much piloerection now.

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  1. must…resist….

    Posted by LinkedSilas

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Miss Piggy

June 3rd, 2009

We have a new arrival at the museum that just got here 3 days ago! Miss Piggy came to us from Pig Pals because they thought that she would be a great companion for our current pig. She will be in quarantine for at least a month to make sure she is healthy and free of any parasites before joining Pig, but eventually you will be able to come visit her in the farmyard. Stay tuned in the future for a Creature Feature to learn more about her!

Join the conversation:

  1. Hey Marilyn-Nancy here. Miss Piggy is super cute! Can't wait to meet her!Thanks to the animal department and our friends at Pig Pals for bringing her to the Museum.Does she eat the same diet as Squeeler? Does she have any favorite treats?Thanks,-Nancy

    Posted by Nancy
  2. She seems to like Cantaloupe pretty well!!!

    Posted by Katy
  3. Hey Nancy-Currently she is eating a mixture of her old and new chow so we can move her over gradually. But she is getting all the fruits and veggies that Squealer gets, and she seems to like almost everything!

    Posted by Marilyn
  4. I love pigs! I am so happy squeeler has a friend!

    Posted by Anonymous
  5. My son Joey and I just read the most recent 10 or so entries in this blog and loved them. He could not believe the wild bear had walked through the culvert in the play area and by the dust pans where he had just played this past weekend. That fascinated him. We'll be back to read more when there's more to read:-) Thanks!

    Posted by Maryann Goldman

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