Posts Tagged ‘physicals’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Wolf on the table

October 18th, 2013

October is wolf physical month. This is the one time of year we get our hands on the wolves and check them out. We were particularly looking forward to getting the male, 1414, on the table. He is huge (almost 80 pounds) and he came to us with a growth on the side of his body that we wanted to look at and remove.

Since 1414 arrived in November 2012, this was our first experience with him for a physical. We learned he is a great patient once he gets on the table. However, he did not “go to sleep” on the same timeline that other wolves have when given their pre-sedation medicine. Typically, while in the crate, we inject some medicine to make the wolves go to sleep. 10-20 minutes later, we can safely muzzle them and move them to the treatment table and do all we need to do.

1414 took over 70 minutes to get somewhat sleepy. Long story short, we finally got him to the table. He is so big he basically filled up the table.

Dr. Vanderford checks out his ears.

Basically, he was in great shape except for the growth on the side of his body. Dr. Vanderford was able to remove it, although it took awhile. The wolf  will spend a few days in a holding cage to limit his movement, but all seems to be okay.

We’ll catch the female up another day and do her physical so we should have more photos to show you soon.

look closely by Jessi and you can see a shaved section on the wolf and the mass is right there.

 

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  1. Thank you for the behind the scenes look at how veterinary care for these guys is done. Great work!

    Posted by JesstheLVT
  2. Thank you so much for sharing your blog with us! Even as a technician student, I know the job market for a CVT wanting to do something like this is very competitive! It’s at least nice to see how it’s done even if the chance I’d get to work with them myself is slim to none:)

    Posted by Light

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

What was happening there?

June 3rd, 2013

I recently posted a drawing and asked you to tell me what was happening here.

original drawing

Many of you commented, but no one was exactly right. The above drawing was indeed of a bear- Gus to be specific. The round dot on his back was his puff of matted hair. I did not think the puff was drawn accurately (unlike the rest of the drawing) so I added the “dart”, “spike-like” projection out of the back.  There is no way I could have drawn this- my artistic skills are poor at best. I do mostly-fine drawing names, and only moderately okay drawing stick-people. This drawing was done by Aaron.

Here’s how I would have drawn the above:

Sherry’s version

The drawing was made so we could visually review who would be standing where during the bears’ physicals. (It was also made for the enjoyment factor because everyone knows I like a good drawing). Positioning is critical during any procedures with dangerous animals, even when they are behind bars. Jessi is the primary trainer for the bears, so she will be there. Dr. Vanderford will be there, with Katy of course doing the physical.

We’ll let you know how the physicals turn out- maybe Aaron will draw another picture!

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Quiz: alligator physical notes

June 1st, 2011

Below is an excerpt from the May 10th Vet Rounds with Dr. Vanderford. See if you understand what’s written. Do you know what the abbreviations stand for? (g, Kg, PE, WNL)? Do you know what “rostral” means?

**Physicals

1029g Alligator #1 3.28 kg fecal negative. PE WNL

1155g Alligator #2 2.92 kgfecal negative.  Thickened rostral mandible with missing teeth. Small sore on rostral mandible.

1310g Alligator #3 3.68 kg - fecal negative.  Small sore rostral mandible with some missing teeth. Trauma due to capture

206g Alligator #4 (ed) 1495g – fecal negative. PE WNL

Click here to see alligator enrichment in action.

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  1. Hello!
    , , , ,

    Posted by viagra

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Lemur Physicals

October 27th, 2010

Last week Dr. Vanderford was here for vet rounds. The ring tailed lemurs got their physicals. Cassandra had her brush with death over the summer, and is doing AMAZINGLY WELL- you would never know there were any issues! A couple photos below from Dr. Vanderford cleaning Casandra’s teeth. All three ring tailed lemurs were checked out and are doing well. It’s no huge surprise that Lycus, our oldest and 25 year old ring tailed lemur, has some teeth worn down. The red ruffed lemurs received their annual physical last month and the three of them are doing well too.

Dr. Vanderford and Cassandra

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Cassandra has her teeth cleaned

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Wolf Physicals

October 6th, 2009

Our red wolves got their annual physicals yesterday, October 5. We’ve had our hands on the female wolf a bunch because of a few different medical issues that have come up while she’s been here, but this was the first time we caught up our male.

What you see in the photos is pretty typical: Even though the wolf is sedated, we put a muzzle on. One keeper (Marilyn, with gloves on) watches the head for any signs of movement or waking.

Katy and Dr. Carter work through the physical checklist to make sure everything gets done.

We learned that our male wolf weighs about 71 pounds and had a lot of tartar build up on his teeth (down from the 78 pounds he weighed when he arrived. All the Keepers thought the male had lost a bunch of weight but I believe Kent was the closest in the unofficial office pool). Our female wolf weighs about 52 pounds. Both of the wolves will go on antibiotics: the male has a small wound on his lip, and the female had a long gash on her back above her tail. They could have got into a fight over who knows what, maybe some deer meat we put in. Both will be fine. If you come by the Museum, the female will be the one missing the hair around her bum (it was shaved to check it out and stitch it up).

If you want to learn more about these wolves, click on the following wolf posts from the past:

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  1. I have been to see the wolves quite a few times and am concerned about the pacing of the wolf in the back of the enclosure. From all of my studies of animals, this is a sign of distress or boredom. What is being done about this?

    Posted by Anonymous
  2. Anonymous:This wolf, 1369, came to us after living at an institution not open to the public. He rarely even saw the people who worked with him. We have noticed him, slowly, getting more used to life here. We have also noticed that he paces less than he used to, and after hours is calmer.With that said, the wolves get are monitored by a professional and caring keeper staff, get daily enrichment, and have regular veterinary care to make sure they are as healthy as possible.Your concerns are valid, and are concerns of our own as well.Please phone the Museum or email through the "contact us" on our website so I can communicate more with you.Thanks for the appropriate and insightful comment.

    Posted by Sherry

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Red Wolf Physicals

November 16th, 2007

Wolf physicals are over for the year, and we learned a few things. First, our wolves’ teeth are in good shape. This is not a huge surprise since our wolves are less than three years old. On the right, you can see Dr. Staab-Carter is checking out #1390s teeth- he had a bit of tarter that was quickly scrapped off. (Keeper Marilyn is helping hold the wolf).

Second, the wolf with PRA is not #1389, but actually #1391. It is easy for the best of us to visually and even behaviorally misidentify the wolves. When we had the wolves sedated for their physicals we were able to scan their microchips and identify which wolf was which. We now know for sure that our “blind” wolf is #1391.

Third, we’ll be able to see what their blood shows: samples are being sent off to check on a variety of things: just like when a person goes to their doctor, blood is taken to test for things like cholesterol, kidney and liver function, PRA, and much more.

Finally, we watch the joints of #1389 closely. He was born with a joint disease, and had a swollen knee recently. Below you can see our veterinarian checking his leg in the photo. This wolf is currently limping and is being held off-exhibit to see if rest will help the leg. We’re hoping that the rest and pain medicine will be all he needs to recover, but we’ll keep you posted.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Red Wolf Physicals today

November 11th, 2007

Today’s the day for the red wolf physicals. It’s 5:00 AM and I am out the door to head to work to continue to prepare. As much as possible has been done in advance to make it easier: carriers have been weighed, last year’s records pulled up, exam room set, and much more.

I’m looking forward to our vet getting a look at the wolf with PRA and also getting blood from his brothers to see if they are carriers of the disease.

Check back in the next week or so to see how the physicals went.

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