Posts Tagged ‘ranger greg’

by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Caterpillars

November 8th, 2013

Did you know that you can be stung by caterpillars?

I was surprised when I got stung by one on the wolf cliff in Explore the Wild.  I didn’t know that it was a caterpillar at first but after describing what it felt like to the other keepers, they said it had to have been a caterpillar.  At that point, I was on a mission to find out what exactly stung me.  I needed to have a plan to properly complete my mission so that I could educate myself, other keepers and museum visitors.

First, I needed to remember where on the wolf cliff that I got stung.  Second, I needed to have a camera on me at all times to capture the creature.  Not a very complex plan but it turned out to be harder than I thought.  Could it have been a sting and run?

After about two weeks, I finally found the creature.  On a small plant, on top of the wolf cliff I found the caterpillar.

 

Any ideas on what kind of caterpillar?

Seeing caterpillars is not new here at the museum.  Keeper Sarah and Ranger Greg have made post on these interesting creatures.  In my next post, I will show you other caterpillars I have encountered while out in Explore the Wild.

 

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Think it may be a Saddleback Caterpillar.

    Posted by Hans
  2. Yes, that is definitely a Saddleback. I’ve been stung more times than I can remember. Unfortunately, it’s not picky about its food plant and can be found almost anywhere. It turns into a small brown moth.

    Posted by Richard
  3. Keeper Comment :

    Richard, thanks for the information. I was very curious on what exactly stung me.

    Posted by Jessi Culbertson

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Spider Identification

September 2nd, 2013

One of my favorite aspects of working in Explore the Wild is the wildlife, whether it be foxes, ground hogs, raccoons, snakes or spiders. I found this spider recently and was quite sure it was a crab spider so I checked with Leon from the Butterfly house, who is an expert. He said it was a Running Crab Spider, they are in the Thomisidae family. They can actually be green, orange, and yellow in color, he also mentioned that they are very quick!

 

A few days later while showing Ranger Greg some interesting growth on a tree near Lemurs, I asked him what the above spider was. It resembles my favorite spider- the Green Lynx. But this one is actually a Orchid Orb Weaver.

 

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Crazy like a Fox

December 16th, 2012

Foxes are omnivores in the Canidae family. This family also includes wolves, dogs, and jackals. With an acute sense of smell they hunt small mammals, fish, insects and eggs, they also eat berries, fruits, and grasses. They cache any excess food, burying it for later.  There are several species of fox, all quite beautiful if you ask me.

Arctic Fox

The arctic fox can survive temperatures as low as -58 degrees F. Often they follow behind Polar Bears, eating leftover scraps.

They have short ears, fluffy feet, and a shorter muzzle.

Fennec fox

The fennec fox has much larger ears, this helps radiate body heat and keep them cool. The smallest fox is nocturnal, which also helps them deal with heat of the Sahara.

Gray Fox

This picture was taken by Ranger Greg right here on grounds at the Museum.

Gray foxes are one of only two canine species able to climb trees (the other is the raccoon dog)

Gray fox climbs tree

Red Fox

The red fox can be found throughout the world in many different types of environment, they are very adaptable to human development.

Crab eating fox

The crab eating fox is a South American species that spends most of it’s time alone or in pairs.

African Bat Eared Fox

This fox pairs for life and their main source of food is the harvester termite.

 

Join the conversation:

  1. I’ve actually seen a Lab climb a tree…

    Posted by Wendy
  2. I bet that was a sight!

    Posted by kimberly
  3. I always enjoy reading Kimberly’s posts. They are very informative and the pictures are great.

    Posted by Billie Mitchell

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

It’s time to say goodbye.

October 19th, 2012

Our male red wolf, 1369, heads out on Tuesday to his new home. I drove him to the Museum from NY and welcomed him just about 4 years ago and now it’s time to say goodbye. It’s a sad, busy, and exciting time getting him ready to head west. He’ll live in Tacoma, WA- the place I call red wolf headquarters. There is a large red wolf holding facility behind-the-scenes at Northwest Trek.

Aaron and I will be spending about 16 hours together in a vehicle getting this wolf on his way (the wolf is flying out of Atlanta so he can travel nonstop). The keepers are wondering what kind of singing will take place with Aaron and I trapped together for so long. (Maybe we’ll record something for everyone to hear).

Ranger Greg got this awesome photo of the wolf hanging out on the side of the cliff. This is how I will try to remember him

Join the conversation:

  1. Safe travels to all of you! I’ll miss pretty boy.

    Posted by jennifer

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Big Word of the Month: Symbiosis

August 21st, 2012

Many of the animals at the museum live with another animal of a different specie. They might live together because they seem to like each other or because they don’t bother one another and fit the exhibit well (large exhibits with 1 animal are pretty boring if that one animal doesn’t want to be in sight of guests). Some of the animals we have together are a donkey and dwarf goats, a steer and a boer goat, a pine snake and a greenish rat snake, a watersnake and a mud turtle, and a spotted turtle and a painted turtle. In the wild, different kinds of animals interact all the time. Those interactions are called symbiosis.

 

Symbiosis (pronounced: sym-BY-OH-sis or sym-BEE-OH-sis) can be defined as prolonged  interactions between different species of animals and/or plants which benefits or harms at least one of the individuals involved.

There are 4 different types of symbiosis: Mutualism, Commensalism, Parasitism and Amensalism.

++ Mutualism- An interaction is mutualistic when both species involved are benefiting from the relationship. As an example, my dog and I have a mutualistic relationship. He gets food, water, shelter, exercise and companionship from me and I get companionship, a jogging buddy, and a personal foot warmer in the winter, from him.

Rudy and Me

My dog, Rudy, and me.

+0 Commensalism- A relationship where one species benefits while the other is unaffected. An example could be Lightning, the donkey, and the Nigerian Dwarf Goats, Rocky and Patches. While, Lightning may get some amount of companionship from the two little goats, he generally seems unaffected when he is separated from them. It feels to me as though he has a fairly neutral attitude towards them. The little goats, however, are highly affected when apart from Lightning (screaming and bleating and acting very anxious). They likely have a herd leader and a protector in Lightning and are positively affected when he’s around.

Lightning and the Little Goats

Lightning guards his new toy

+- Parasitism- Parasites come in all forms! The easy ones are ticks, mosquitoes, fleas, chiggers, and any other blood/skin sucking bug. However, other plants and animals can be considered parasites as well (Cowbirds, Cukoos, Mistletoe). So long as one species in the relationship is negatively affected while the other is positively affected, a parasitic relationship is at hand. Because ticks are one of Marilyn’s favorite animals, I’ll add this picture just for her:

hungry bug

Photo Credit: NewNaturalist.com

 

0- Amensalism- If commensalism is a neutral/positive (0+) relationship, its opposite is amensalism, a neutral/negative (0-) relationship. Of the 4 types of symbiosis, this is by far the rarest. Amensalism requires that one species be negatively impacted while another is not being impacted at all. The text book examples of this are Penicillin mold growing on stale bread and the Black Walnut tree. Ranger Greg was kind enough to look for some of these trees for me (a more pleasant option than waiting for some bread to mold), which he found just off the Dinosaur Trail. Black Walnut trees secrete a toxin into the soil as a natural part of their growth that inhibits or kills off plants that would otherwise grow near the tree. The smaller plants are negatively impacted, while the Black Walnut tree just keeps on growing.

Black Walnut Tree

Note the lack of undergrowth below the Black Walnut tree (left of center)

Many of the animals and plants on grounds have symbiotic relationships with other plants and animals nearby. Stop by the butterfly house and gardens to find some really cool relationships or find Ranger Greg and ask him about some of his favorites!

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Excellent post! Lots of interesting information.

    Posted by Carrie
  2. Thanks so much for thinking of me with that disgusting picture, Sarah. I especially love that the tick is embedded in the skin. Yippy!

    Posted by Marilyn
  3. thanks so much for all the info! i’d love to use your website as a citation in my project but i cant find the publishers company, editors, or what city it was published in! can you help me?

    Posted by Athena
  4. do you possibly know of a mutualism pair that live in the taiga??? i cant find one anywhere… if you dont know of one off the top of your head then its fine but if you do can you plz tell me???

    Posted by Alex
  5. Keeper Comment :

    Athena and Alex, you can both e-mail me at SarahV@ncmls.org and I can try to answer any questions you have.

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

We saw Chip!

May 27th, 2012

 

Chip was seen Thursday night . Learn more by reading Ranger Greg’s Blog.

Chip. May 24, 2012

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Was wondering about when the first time Chip was seen at the museum. It is always great to see old friends!!!

    Posted by dj
  2. Director Comment :

    Greg spotted her two years ago. I believe others had seen her long before that too.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  3. I have a turtle that has outgrown its tank. I am looking for a good home for it. Do you accept turtles?

    Posted by Joe Sands
  4. Director Comment :

    Joe- we are not in need of any turtles right now, sorry.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Magicicadas

August 29th, 2011

Another post from our invertebrate specialist, Rachael Knight.  It’s a must read for cicada lovers!

When Ranger Greg wrote about the Magicicadas last May, I couldn’t wait to get out to the Eno and experience it for myself.  I was especially intrigued by Robin’s comment:  “…when you pick one up it growls at you!”  The idea of a growling insect was amusing to me, so I grabbed the camera and went out to see if I could capture the phenomenon.  It didn’t take me long to locate one, but it didn’t make any noise when I picked it up.  I encouraged it by squeezing it lightly with my fingers.  I wouldn’t describe the sound it made as growling, but the way its whole body vibrated was still quite cute.  I was impressed with the performance until my dog started pestering one of our annual cicadas in the yard the other day.  I’ve never seen an insect sputter, shout, buzz and flail about so wildly and loudly as this little guy did.  Now that was a show I wish I’d been filming!

YouTube Preview Image

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Jason found a live one on his walk one day and showed it to Evan. That brave little guy even held it and checked it all out before it flew away. I’m so proud of my future nature-lover!

    Posted by Bobbi Jo

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Quiz: Name That Bear

July 9th, 2011

Ranger Greg often posts wonderful quizzes for everyone. Here’s mine to add to the mix.

Name that bear  (Photos courtesy of Kelly Taylor- thanks Kelly). Bonus points for naming the fruit in photo #2.

#1

#2

#3

#4

Join the conversation:

  1. …is #3 Yona? They all look like smiling and happy bears with their treats!!!

    Posted by DJ
  2. #1 Gus
    #2 Ursula…with a pear?
    #3 Yona
    #4 Looks like Urs too

    Posted by Ashlyn
  3. Gus
    Urs
    Gus?
    Urs

    Posted by Kimberly
  4. I’m going with Kimberly on this one:
    1. Gus
    2. Urs (with a Mango)
    3. Gus
    4. Urs

    Posted by Sarah
  5. Director Comment :

    Ashlyn got all the bears correct, and Sarah got the fruit!
    Well done folks.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  6. Yay! I was thinking that looked like a mango but hadn’t seen any on the list lately (hadn’t had time to look either). Good job Sarah!

    Posted by Ashlyn
  7. Urs is so red this year! I thought for sure #2 was Mimi.

    Posted by Leslie

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: Spring is here

March 22nd, 2011

Spring is here and it’s a great time to see the native wildlife awaken. Reptiles we haven’t seen in awhile start to come out. It’s a chance to find some unexpected sights! Ranger Greg’s Blog is awesome, and if you want to see amazing photos of flora and fauna check out his blog. He’s been capturing signs of spring already.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: Neighborhood Red Shouldered Hawks

February 28th, 2010

I walked out of my house late this morning and saw mating between two red shouldered hawks that were about 20 feet away from me. It was pretty cool (and loud) and even though I felt badly about interrupting, it reminded me that Spring is in the air and there’s a lot going on with the nature around us at this time of year.

Bill Majoros took some AMAZING PHOTOS of red shouldered hawks in Northgate Park. Click here to see his photos from last year. I live in the neighborhood, so it is very possible the birds I saw were the same as those in his photos.

Ranger Greg knows just about everything about birds so he can chime in and provide more info. We have a pair of red shouldered hawks who frequent Explore the Wild. Ranger Greg also has some great posts on his Blog about hawks (and soooo much more).

Join the conversation:

  1. Thanks for these links (the baby hawk photos are amazing)! I just saw one of those adult hawks at Explore the Wild eating in the tree above the Red Wolf exhibit–on a day I didn't have my camera with me! But my binoculars gave me a good view of the event.

    Posted by ktraphagen
  2. realkly cool.

    Posted by Anonymous

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