Posts Tagged ‘raptors’

by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Bathing Birdies

November 25th, 2013

The other day while I was closing the farmyard, it began to pour. I had to construct a makeshift poncho out of a garbage bag, because I didn’t follow the golden rule of the boy scouts and was unprepared. I stood there for what seemed like an  hour waiting for the duck to go into his stall for the night. Duck, being the duck he is felt it was better to be out in the rain and bathe in his pool instead.

Animals can bathe in dust or water and is extremely important to a birds health because it helps in the maintenance of feathers. My coworkers think I am weird because I bring my pet parrot in the shower when I have to clean up. (Bird people are very interesting)

Here at the museum, we provide ample amounts of water for all of our birds to bathe in. Its not uncommon to see the duck in water, but when we are lucky we catch a glimpse of  our raptors.

Look closely below, our Barred Owl-Christoper is spreading his wings and taking a shower during the down pour.

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Raptor Center Road Trip & a Quiz!

July 22nd, 2013

Kimberly and I recently took a road trip out to the Carolina Raptor Center in Huntersville, NC to pick up our two new owls. The trip out was uneventful (unlike the ride home) and we got to walk around the facility before crating up our birds for the van ride home.  Here are photos of few of the residents at the Raptor Center. How many raptors can you ID?

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Join the conversation:

  1. I thought at first that #1 was a Black-shouldered Kite (part of the wing looks very dark) and I can’t see the tail which would by white in black-shouldered. Also, B-s Kite is a southwest bird, which I thought would eliminate it, but I see you have two more SW species below.
    From what I can see of bird #1, I’m going to have to go with Mississippi Kite based on the lores and foot color, and I think I can see a tiny bit of a dark tail…
    Bird #2 is Peregrine Falcon.
    Bird #3, Crested Caracara.
    Bird #4, Harris’ Hawk.
    Bird #5, Barn Owl.

    Posted by Ranger Greg
  2. Keeper Comment :

    You’ve got them all, Greg!

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuiKPic: Raptor handling

February 27th, 2013

I train the keepers and educators to handle our two program raptors. (Misha and Christopher). I’ve completed five weeks of work with Molly, but she still needs to practice. She’s decided to send me a photo every time she take out one of the birds to show me of her commitment.  Way to go Molly!

Molly with Christopher

Join the conversation:

  1. What a cutie! Christopher is pretty cute too ;)

    Posted by Erin

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

Birds of Prey

July 17th, 2010

Many people that know me are aware of the fact that I love birds.  I especially like birds of prey and parrots.  Being, that I am a new blogger, I decided to do a few posts about birds.  In this one, I am going to introduce you to Birds of prey and raptors.  All raptors are birds of prey, but not all birds of prey are raptors. Confused?  Well, a raptor is defined as birds that kill prey with its feet while a bird of prey refers to birds that are carnivorous.  An example of that would be a hawk is a raptor and a vulture is a bird of prey.   They fall under the order of Falconiformes and are under  different families.   Nocturnal birds, such as owls are under the family of Strigiformes.

A bird of preys senses are all geared to one purpose,eating.   Take for example its eyes.  Birds will hunt mainly with its eyes,they can pick up at least four times the amount of detail of something then a human can.  Some birds have great hearing, such as an owl who hunts with little light available.  These hunters also have bills that are shaped for specific foods they eat.Some are designed for tearing through skin and muscle and breaking bones.Some beaks are made for pulling certain foods from inside shells such as the snail kite. Many people don’t know that a birds sense of smell isn’t the greatest.  However, most vultures have exceptional smelling abilities to sniff out that  yummy rotten carcass on the side of the road.  Feet are very important to a raptor, it  is the main method of killing its prey because sharp talons will pierce through skin and muscle.   The coloration of raptors are made for blending in with their environment.   Another feature is flight, some birds soar,some dive,some birds ambush and some hunt out in the open.   I hope to do another blog on this subject alone.

The last thing I wanted to mention was conservation of the birds of prey species.   Many of them are on the threatened list.   Some of this has to do with people shooting birds like Misha.   Others are in trouble because of their place in the food chain,they are one of the top dogs, or should I say birds on the order.  When its prey is affected such as fish being poisoned, it effects the birds as well.

Hopefully, you were able to take some information away with you on birds of prey.   Like I said before, I intend to do several posts about birds.   If you have any requests, let me know.

bird of prey

Photo by Rolf Hicker

Join the conversation:

  1. Keeper Comment :

    Jill loves birds, except ones bigger than an owl. Anything larger scares her to death!

    Posted by Larry Boles
  2. Larry,you lie like a rug. ;)

    Posted by jebrown

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Spotlight: Jill Brown

March 19th, 2010
 
I have been slack on my Spotlight postings, but I will recommit to telling you all about the special people who work in, with, or help the animal department. I’ve  written spotlights on the rest of the keepers, so here’s the last one, or as Jill would say, I saved the best for last.
 
This is Jill.  She’s been a Keeper here for almost five years ( you can wish her a happy anniversary on September 12). Jill loves birds and Boba Fett. She’s one of only two keepers who is an approved raptor handler. She has trained and is able to have Misha, our red tail hawk, or Christopher, our program barred owl, sit on her hand and walk around doing programs (or bringing them to the building if a vet check is needed).
Jill is also our primary pig trainer. She is working with Auggie and Miss Piggy. Miss Piggy is sitting, and both pigs are getting really good at COME.  Hopefully Jill will chime in the comment section and let us know what behaviors the pigs have down and what new ones she’s working on with them.
 
Jill gets teased a lot by the rest of the team about her cheery personality and her messy desk. She can take it though, and dishes it out just the same. When it comes down to the basics though, Jill rarely misses is a day of work, is always on time, and focuses on animals that others don’t . She helps round out our amazing team of Keepers at the Museum.

Join the conversation:

  1. Sherry, what do you do with the bear poop? Seriously – I’ve heard of the benefits of rabbit, sheep, horse manure, but can you put bear poop in your garden? Or would that just attract other bears?

    Posted by Wendy
  2. Director Comment :

    Wendy and others: We add the bear poop to the Museum’s compost pile.

    As far as attracting other bears: I wouldn’t be concenred about attracting bears to my garden unless I lived in bear country and I grew food that bears like to eat.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  3. Keeper Comment :

    Thanks *blush*
    The pigs are doing great.We are going to start working on “down”.I have also found out that the pigs love to have their ears cleaned which makes it much easier and less stress on the pigs AND keepers to do their job.

    Posted by jebrown

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *