Posts Tagged ‘red ruffed lemurs’

by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Lounging Around

May 31st, 2014

Look who is enjoying a nice sunny day…

Iris and RR sunning

The Red Ruffed Lemurs like to spend time in their side cages when the weather is nice.  Iris has found a great spot to kick back and relax.

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Birthday Celebration

March 30th, 2014

Cynthia, who is our oldest Red Ruffed Lemur, turned 33 years old on March 30th.  This makes Cynthia the oldest Red Ruffed Lemur in the country.  33 years is old for any lemur considering the average lifespan in captivity is early twenties.  In the wild, lemurs tend to live longer to around mid-twenties.  Since lemurs are endemic to Madagascar, it can be difficult to replicate their dietary and habitat needs in a captive environment.  The keepers felt that 33 years of life for a lemur would be a great reason to celebrate.  On Thursday the 27th, we provided the Red Ruffed Lemurs with a variety of different enrichment items.  They received puzzle feeders, skewers, streamers, and colorful bags with dried fruit.  At the 2pm lemur program, guest sang “Happy Birthday” from Lemur viewing  and keepers talked about Cynthia as well as general information on lemurs.

If you were unable to make it to the Birthday celebration, here are some pictures of the big day….

Decorations in inside viewing at Lemurs.

Decorations in inside viewing which are the enrichment items for not just Cynthia but Jethys and Iris too.

Cynthia checking out what is in the colorful bag.

Cynthia checking out what is in the colorful bag.

 

Cynthia smelling the streamers.

Cynthia smelling the streamers.

 

Cynthia, Jethys and Iris all checking out the enrichment items.

Cynthia, Jethys and Iris all checking out the enrichment items.

 

 

Birthday Cakes

Birthday Cakes

 

Getting more enrichment items for the 2pm program.  This is fruit skewered on paper towel tubes.

Getting more enrichment items for the 2pm program. This is fruit skewered on paper towel tubes.

 

Autumn and I getting a larger paper towel tube ready with mango, kiwi and dried cherries.

Autumn and I getting a larger paper towel tube ready with mango, kiwi and dried cherries.

 

Cynthia going to a puzzle feeder that had a variety of fruit and veggies inside it.

Cynthia going to a puzzle feeder that had a variety of fruit and veggies inside it.

 

Jethys eating one of the birthday cakes.

Jethys eating one of the birthday cakes.

 

Cynthia and the skewered fruit paper towel tube.  Iris is looking in one of the puzzle feeders.

Cynthia and the skewered fruit paper towel tube. Iris is looking in one of the puzzle feeders.

 

The keepers and guest had a great time watching the Red Ruffed Lemurs explore and manipulate their enrichment items.  After it was all over, they all found their spots on the perching and rested.

Time to rest.

Time to rest.

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I have been a keeper at the museum since May 2012, but I was an intern back in the spring of 2011. I am very passionate about animals and my favorites are native species with the exception of sloths. In my spare time, I am working on a Bachelor's degree with OSU online in environmental science. I have two dogs, a snake, and a cat.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and you will usually see me somewhere in Explore the Wild. I love giving keeper talks, so hope to see you at 2 pm for our meet the keeper programs in Explore the Wild.

Upcoming Birthday Celebration!

March 23rd, 2014

Cynthia, our oldest Red Ruffed Lemur, will be turning 33 years old on March 30th.  On March 27th, the Explore the Wild team (Autumn and myself) will be providing Cynthia and the other Red Ruffed Lemurs with different types of enrichment and food items so that we can celebrate this milestone.  This will provide the Red Ruffed Lemurs with great opportunities to interact with different food items and enrichment plus give the keepers a chance to take a lot of pictures!  So, this will be very enriching to the keepers.

 

My next post will show what we did for Cynthia on her big day plus how she and the other Red Ruffed Lemurs interacted with all the items.

 

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  1. Director Comment :

    We’ve already had a couple bags of fruit and other goodies dropped off. Thanks Neighbor:

    http://blogs.lifeandscience.org/keepers/2013/03/24/spotlight-my-anonymous-neighbor/

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  2. Congratulations to Cynthia for being one of the oldest Red-ruffed lemurs in captivity in the world – You go girl!!! Get your party on!!!

    Posted by Katy

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Huge thanks to VSH: Veterinary Specialty Hospital.

February 7th, 2014

In addition to last week’s snow, we took four animal over to VSH in Durham. The Veterinary Specialty Hospital along with Dr. Cindy Godshalk of East Coast Veterinary Imaging donated their facility, services, and staff to ultrasound and radiograph four of our animals. AND, this isn’t the first time they’ve stepped up and helped out:

Dr. Godshalk at work

The first time was 3.5 years ago when Cassandra needed an ultrasound. Last year we brought two snakes to VSH in Cary for ultrasounds with Dr. Godshalk. And in 2102, Dr. Godshalk and her crew came on grounds to ultrasound the female wolf.

Katy packed everyone up along with our supplies. Can you guess which carrier has which animal?

Last week a pine snake (Megatron), a ferret (Dixie), a bearded dragon (Jr.) and a red ruffed lemur (Iris) all needed tests: ultrasounds and radiographs. Dr. Vanderford arranged with VSH and Dr. Godshalk to bring our critters in on Monday.

Jen, one of the Vet Techs, was helping us left and right and with this and that and everything else. We were really fortunate that she, and everyone else, was excited to have the slithery and scaly and furry exotic critters we brought with us.

Jen logs each of the animals and the procedures needed into the system.

Megatron is over 7 feet long.

 

Megatron, one of our adult male pine snakes, needed radiographs. (He is the father of the pine snakes that hatched in July 2012). He has a section of his body that doesn’t really bend, so we wanted to get “x-rays” to check things out. The pictures showed some calcification on the spine. We don’t know why this happens, but we’ve seen it before in other snakes. We’ll be really careful when handling him and let him get exercise on flat surfaces.

staff at VSH checking out Megatron’s films.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Vanderford helps Dixie pose for the shot.

Dixie, one of our four ferrets needed an ultrasound. We wanted to see if she had insulinoma. An insulinoma is a tumor on the pancreas. This is a very common ferret disease. Dixie had to be shaved for the ultrasound. We tried to hold her still but were unsuccessful so we had to use anesthesia to sedate her for the ultrasound. It doesn’t look like Dixie has an insulinoma, however we need to review the ultrasounds and determine next steps in case there are other issues to move on.

Dixie with her shaved abdomen being “gassed” down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Iris, a 22-year-old red ruffed lemur was next. Katy saw some concerning cells in a urine test she had run- cells that could be indicative of cancer. Good timing that Katy found this out a few days before our visit to VSH so Iris came along  to be checked out.

Dr. Godshalk working with Iris.

 

We were thinking there might be bladder cancer, or a cancer of the reproductive organs, but that wasn’t found. That’s good news for sure. I cannot tell anything when I look at the ultrasound pictures, but we’ll be reviewing what was learned and determining what steps are next. (Dr. Godshalk is a board certified radiologist so it doesn’t matter that I cannot recognize anything- she takes care of all that!)

small print outs, about 4×4 inches of the different views.

Jen and Dr. Godshalk get photos of Jr.

Junior was the last patient. She’s a bearded dragon. A few weeks ago her beard was quite swollen and Jr. wasn’t eating well. Dr. Vanderford and Katy sedated her at the Museum and pulled about 8 cc of fluid from her beard. While she has improved, we wanted to further assess and try to determine the cause of her issues.

 

Maybe the ultrasound want felt like a message to junior?

 

Junior was possibly the easiest of the four animals to work with. She didn’t need to get shaved (no fur on reptiles). She didn’t need to get sedated- she just held still without any wiggling or struggling. She made it really easy.

 

 

 

4 DVMs consulting on Junior’s case: Vanderford, Godshalk, Eward, and Eward.

Jen get’s Junior in the perfect position to get the needed radiograph.

After Junior finished with the ultrasound, she went in for radiographs. Jen was able to get great films, and she even got Junior to hold still on her side! While the ultrasound didn’t show any smoking gun, an unrelated finding on the radiographs shows some real issues with Junior’s vertebrae.

Dr. Godshalk reviews Junior’s films

Thanks so much to VSH!!  The generosity and help of all the staff their have been wonderful. We are very fortunate to have them help us care for our animal population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

lemur physicals

August 16th, 2013

This week the red ruffed lemurs got their annual physicals.

QUIZ: who’s wearing the blue gloves, who’s wearing the white gloves, and whose sneakers are showing?

All three girls- Cynthia, Iris, and Jethys-  did great. Each one, from pre-sedation to reversal took 37 minutes. We’re waiting for blood work to come back, but everyone’s initial findings seemed to be okay. Our girls are getting old so I always have concerns about what the tests will show. Cynthia is almost 32 years old. The Duke lemur center only has one red ruffed lemur older than her.

 

Annie’s job at the end was to keep each lemur warm, make sure they awoke with no issue, and then put them in their crate.

 

Annie always takes notes during the physicals and makes sure the Dr. Vanderford and Katy get everything done on the list. This year she had an added bonus of holding the lemurs at the end.

Katy was running a rectal thermometer and an ear thermometer to see if the temperatures were the same (which they were).

Hopefully all the blood work comes back okay! In September, we’ll do physicals on the ring tailed lemurs. (More pictures then.

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  1. Blue gloves-Sherry
    White gloves-Katy
    Sitting in the chair- Annie

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. CORRECT!

    Posted by sherry

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Ring-Tailed Lemurs moved to the inside exhibit

January 14th, 2013

If you are a regular visitor you may have noticed a change at  lemurs. The ring tailed lemurs are now in the inside exhibit and the red ruffed lemurs will spend their estrus cycle off exhibit. We made the switch on one of our closed Mondays. In terms of animal stress it was minimal. All lemurs spent a lot of time exploring their new areas. I snapped several great pictures of the ring tailed lemurs checking out every square inch of their new exhibit. They climbed on everything they possibly could! I stayed up there with them to monitor their exploration, making sure they didn’t get hurt during their excitement. Now that their exhibit is no longer novel, they have been enjoying snuggling up together in a lemur ball on the ground. Look down and to your left if you don’t immediately see them. Click here to see how the red ruffed lemurs are doing off exhibit.

 

 

 

 

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Red Ruffed Lemur Training

December 21st, 2012

I recently mentioned we’re now working on crate training the red ruffed lemurs. It’s been quite awhile since they have worked on this behavior. The last couple days have been very successful. All three lemurs have gone all the way into their crates. :)

This is just the beginning so check back soon for updates.

Keeper Marilyn and I training the three red ruffed lemurs

 

Iris going into the crate

  

Iris is going into the top crate at the same time that Jethys is going into the bottom crate.

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Ring-Tailed Lemur training update

December 12th, 2012

It’s been awhile since I’ve updated and we’ve seen a lot of progress. My last post was about Cassandra exploring the vet room. We allowed her to do this once more and it went about the same as the first time. I believe the second time, she took longer to come down, seemed like she was enjoying exploring too much. Before that I wrote about crate training, which has been my biggest goal with the ring-tailed lemurs. (now it’s our biggest goal with the red ruffed lemurs too, check back for future posts about that)

Their physicals were way back in September, on that particular day I was only able to crate Cassandra. The boys both went into their crate but then bounced right back out, Sherry said catching them was very easy that day.  We also changed where the lemurs wait for sedation. We started using a metal cage located in the vet room. It’s roomier which makes it easier to get the lemur out of.

Cassandra just outside the cage we use in the vet room

This is an added part of crate training. I bring the lemurs into the building and then open this cage and their crate door and ask them to go inside.  I have also been practicing this behavior with the lemurs down at the lemur house. We took an extra vet room cage and placed it inside their holding space in the lemur house. It’s big and silver and makes a lot of noise when the jump on it, but the good news is, this behavior is working. They are not afraid of it and have no problems climbing all over and inside of it, making their visit to the vet room much less stressful.

About a week later we needed to get blood work on Cassandra again. It was very easy to crate her using training which made everything run smoother.  Then in November I noticed Lycus was holding his left hand across his chest. It seemed like a shoulder injury. Dr V came in to check him out and decided she wanted to do hands on with him. This meant getting him into the crate and bringing him to the building. Using training it was super easy. I still practice crate training a couple times a week. It has helped the process of vet visits tremendously and it’s something I want to continue working on. Next challenge is crate training the red ruffed lemurs.

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  1. Many many Kudos to all your lemur training (and also to all the other keepers)!!! The lemurs seem so stress free with their physicals…more like an outing in a cool playground!!

    Posted by dj
  2. Thanks so much DJ!

    Posted by kimberly

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Photos from Explore the Wild

September 24th, 2012

Lemurs-

Cynthia sleeping- can you believe she finds this position comfortable???

Cassandra having a bite to eat

Lycus sitting between the shift door

The beginning of station stump training

Ring Tail!

 

 Bears-  

Two bears during a keeper talk. Keeper Talks are in Explore the Wild everyday at 2pm!

Gus laid out on a hot day, Yona is curled up close by

I love seeing Mimi’s cute face each morning

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Lemur Photos

February 26th, 2012

I wanted to share some Lemur photos.

If you remember back several months ago- we had two interns Casey and Jessica who did their enrichment project for the lemurs- it was a teepee tree. We still use it and here are some recent photos of the ring tails climbing on it.

Lycus climbing

Cassandra and Satyrus climbing on their enrichment

 

As for the red ruffed lemurs, we were treating Iris twice a day with medicine that we put in mashed banana, which often meant her sister and mother also got mashed banana as a treat.  Here are photos of Jethys (Iris’ sister) who was so “excited” about her banana- she took the bowl right out of my hand and held it herself- hahaha

Jethys holding her own bowl with both hands

One hand!

When she was finished she dropped it on the ground

 

Hope you enjoyed- here’s Lycus to say GOODBYE

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