Posts Tagged ‘red wolves’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Wolf burying food

September 16th, 2014

I love this video! The female wolf is burying food. She seems to be  playing with the male, the male “responds” to her… Thanks Katy for having your camera with you!

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  1. Keeper Comment :

    The best part is when he vomits up something and she starts to lick it!!! So gross!!! (I don’t go anywhere without my camera just for these gross moments!)

    Posted by Katy Harringer

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: some good news for red wolves

May 16th, 2014

” A federal judge in North Carolina on Tuesday ordered a stop to coyote hunting near the world’s only wild population of endangered red wolves because the animals look so similar and are easily confused” . Read the full article here or at : http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/05/13/3858932/us-judge-blocks-coyote-hunting.html

 

Red Wolf 1414.

Ranger Greg’s photo of male red wolf 1414

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Last week’s snow

February 4th, 2014

It’s been so busy I haven’t had time to share photos with you. Some places at the Museum had as much as 3 inches of snow, and we were closed on Wednesday.

We staged 20 shovels and 4 push brooms so as staff arrived they could get to work clearing paths and steps.

No surprise that Donald showed up as regularly scheduled

Aaron and I noticed lots of tracks in the snow in the wolf yard. Sorry, no photos as I couldn’t hold a camera, broom, pool skimmer (to break the ice and remove it from the pool), food, and bucket.

The female wolf seemed fine in the snow

Not sure what he is looking at. Right before this photo he had peed on some food.

 

All the bears were in their usual winter  spots. Yona would not get out of bed to get her treatments (Cosequin, vitamin supplements, and a de-wormer). I honestly sat their (yup, on a rock after clearing off the snow) for almost 15 minutes. Luckily for me Virginia came over huffed and stomped at Yona who got up and ran out of bed.

Virginia Chasing Yona out of bed.

 

Yona stomping back as Virginia left.

Sorry, no photos of the farmyard- maybe next snow.

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Red Wolf links

November 13th, 2013

Becky Bartel of USFWS took this photo of our male, 1414

 

 

 

I’ve received a variety of information from USFWS  and RWC personnel in the past week or so about red wolves so I thought I would share with you. Click on any of the links below:

 

 

 

Becky Bartel’s photos of our wolves

A new post (about the Museum!) from the Blog of the USFWS Red Wolf Recovery Program

Washington Post article about red wolf  deaths from gunshot

RedWolf_QtrReport_FY13-04 (2)

 

 

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Second Red Wolf shot

November 1st, 2013

more bad news for the red wolves… a wolf was shot last week and now a second one this week. Here’s the link to previous information and a copy of today’s news release is below that.

http://www.fws.gov/southeast/news/2013/078.html

 

November 1, 2013

*Reward Offered for Information Regarding to a Second Red Wolf Death*

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is requesting assistance with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of a radio-collared red wolf that was recently found dead.  The federally protected wolf was found with a suspected gunshot wound on Wednesday, October 30, 2013, south of Roper and west of Lake Phelps in Washington County, North Carolina.

This is the second wolf found dead this week.

Anyone with information that directly leads to an arrest, a criminal conviction, a civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of property on the subject or subjects responsible for the suspected unlawful take of this red wolf may be eligible for a reward of up to $2,500.

A total of 10 red wolves have died since January 1, 2013.  Of those 10, three were struck and killed by vehicles, one died as a result of non-management related actions, and six were confirmed or suspected gunshot deaths.

The red wolf is protected under The Endangered Species Act. The maximum criminal penalties for the unlawful taking of a red wolf are one year imprisonment and $100,000 fine per individual.  Anyone with information on the death of this red wolf or any others, past or future, is urged to contact Resident Agent in Charge John Elofson at (404) 763-7959, Refuge Officer Frank Simms at (252) 216-7504, or North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Officer Robert Wayne at (252) 216-8225.

BACKGROUND:

The red wolf is one of the world’s most endangered wild canids.  Once common throughout the southeastern United States, red wolf populations have been decimated due to intensive predator control programs and loss of habitat.  A remnant population of red wolves was found along the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana.  After being declared an endangered species in 1967, efforts were initiated to locate and capture as many wild red wolves as possible.  Of the 17 remaining wolves captured by biologists, 14 became the founders of a successful zoo-based breeding program.  Consequently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared red wolves extinct in the wild in 1980.

The first litter of red wolves born in captivity occurred in 1977.  By 1987, enough red wolves were bred in captivity to begin a restoration program on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern North Carolina.  Since then, the experimental population area has expanded to include three national wildlife refuges, a Department of Defense bombing range, state-owned lands, and private property, spanning a total of 1.7 million acres.

About 100 red wolves roam their native habitats in five northeastern North Carolina counties.   Additionally, nearly 200 red wolves comprise the Species Survival Plan managed breeding program in sites across the United States, still an essential element of red wolf recovery.

The red wolf is one of two species of wolves in North America, the other being the gray wolf, (*Canis* *lupus*).  As their name suggests, red wolves are known for the characteristic reddish color of their fur most apparent behind the ears and along the neck and legs, but are mostly brown and buff colored with some black along their backs.  Intermediate in size to gray wolves and coyotes, the average adult red wolf weighs 45-80 pounds, stands about 26 inches at the shoulder and is about 4 feet long from the tip of the nose to the end of the tail.

Red wolves are social animals that live in packs consisting of a breeding pair and their offspring of different years, typically five to eight animals.  Red wolves prey on a variety of wild mammals such as raccoon, rabbit, white-tailed deer, nutria, and other rodents.  Most active at dusk and dawn, red wolves are elusive and generally avoid humans and human activity.

To learn more about red wolves and the Service’s efforts to recover them, please visit www.fws.gov/redwolf<http://www.fws.gov/redwolf>.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Red Wolf Recovery Program

P. O. Box 1969

Manteo, North Carolina 27954

Contact: David Rabon, 252-473-1132

 

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  1. Prosecute to the fullest when they are found

    Posted by Theresa Smith
  2. Stop!

    Posted by Hilarie
  3. How very sad to see how many are lost to gun-shot :( Responsible hunters are absolutely sure of their targets. Irresponsible hunters should have their guns confiscated.

    Posted by Carrie
  4. and two more red wolves shot:
    November 15, 2013

    *Federal Officials Request Assistance Regarding Two More Red Wolves Missing or Dead*

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is requesting assistance with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of two more radio-collared red wolves in two separate locations south of Columbia, in
    Tyrrell County, North Carolina. One federally protected wolf’s body was found with an apparent gunshot wound on Tuesday, November 12, 2013. In a separate location in the same county on the same day, a red wolf radio collar was discovered with evidence that it had been cut off.

    Anyone with information that directly leads to an arrest, a criminal conviction, a civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of property on the subject or subjects responsible for the suspected unlawful take of a red wolf may be eligible for a reward of up to $2,500

    Posted by sherry

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Wolf on the table

October 18th, 2013

October is wolf physical month. This is the one time of year we get our hands on the wolves and check them out. We were particularly looking forward to getting the male, 1414, on the table. He is huge (almost 80 pounds) and he came to us with a growth on the side of his body that we wanted to look at and remove.

Since 1414 arrived in November 2012, this was our first experience with him for a physical. We learned he is a great patient once he gets on the table. However, he did not “go to sleep” on the same timeline that other wolves have when given their pre-sedation medicine. Typically, while in the crate, we inject some medicine to make the wolves go to sleep. 10-20 minutes later, we can safely muzzle them and move them to the treatment table and do all we need to do.

1414 took over 70 minutes to get somewhat sleepy. Long story short, we finally got him to the table. He is so big he basically filled up the table.

Dr. Vanderford checks out his ears.

Basically, he was in great shape except for the growth on the side of his body. Dr. Vanderford was able to remove it, although it took awhile. The wolf  will spend a few days in a holding cage to limit his movement, but all seems to be okay.

We’ll catch the female up another day and do her physical so we should have more photos to show you soon.

look closely by Jessi and you can see a shaved section on the wolf and the mass is right there.

 

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  1. Thank you for the behind the scenes look at how veterinary care for these guys is done. Great work!

    Posted by JesstheLVT
  2. Thank you so much for sharing your blog with us! Even as a technician student, I know the job market for a CVT wanting to do something like this is very competitive! It’s at least nice to see how it’s done even if the chance I’d get to work with them myself is slim to none:)

    Posted by Light

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Red Wolf Pictures

May 24th, 2013

I finally figured out how to use the zoom on my phone. The wolves are difficult to snap good pictures of without a zoom.

The female, 1287

The male, 1414

the female

The male is the one facing the camera

photogenic 1414

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  1. Wow these are great. I love the close up on 1414.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. Thanks!

    Posted by Kimberly
  3. I can never get enough of these beautiful animals. Great pictures Kimberly!!

    Posted by Jamie Gray
  4. Thanks Jamie

    Posted by Kimberly

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Both Wolves Howling

March 28th, 2013

Katy spent a bunch of time at the wolf exhibit the past few weeks and she had her camera!!! Check this out:

YouTube Preview Image

 

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  1. Awesome video! Great job Katy.

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. This is Great!

    Posted by matts

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Wolf Update

March 12th, 2013

our two wolves, male 1414 and female 1287, encased in a hopefully love-match.

 In 5-6 weeks I hope to be writing about WOLF PUPPIES.

Ranger Greg has been blogging and tweeting about what he’s seen our wolves up to. We certainly hope it’s about puppy-making. We won’t know for sure until we actually see pups since the past two years our female has gone through pseudopregnancies. We have a new male this breeding season, so with 1414 we’re hoping for some renewed hope of actual pups.

Every summer I go to the Red Wolf SSP master plan meeting. I didn’t write about this past summer’s meeting, but did take a photo of our new pair of wolves as drawn during the meeting. You also heard about our shipping out of our former male wolf (1369), including a detailed quiz about my 16 hour drive with Aaron to get 1369 to the airport in Atlanta for his trip out to WA.

Our former wolf, 1369, is doing fine out in Tacoma. I learned he sits outside the den while his new “girlfriend” sits inside the den. He was seen “snuggling” next to her during breeding season. The folks at Tacoma are going to catch him up this week and collect semen on him. (We are not sure if he is able to make pups…understand?)

So, hopefully we’ll have wonderful little additions to blog about in April.  Stay tuned.

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  1. Wolf pups would be such a great thing for the red wolf captive population and for the species as a whole. I’m very excited to keep up with your blogs and to see what comes of this.

    Posted by Casey Sweet

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: Bad news continues for red wolves in the wild

February 25th, 2013

The shooting of red wolves in the wild continues- it’s very sad and troubling. Another article below.  http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/extinction-countdown/2013/02/19/reward-red-wolf-killed/

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  1. Poor wolves :( I love them. How can anyone be so mean and cruel? No cares that they are endangered. Can’t anyone help these poor creatures

    Posted by Anna

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