Posts Tagged ‘ring tailed lemur’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

New Lemurs

August 17th, 2014

Surprise, our blog is not down nor re-designed. That will happen soon. Instead, let me show you some photos of our new lemurs. All the photos are of the lemurs at the Toledo Zoo. You’ll be able to see the five boys here starting on August 18th- come on by and look for them in the Indoor Viewing area and meet Oliver, Maky, Misa, dan, and Henri.

new lemurs with mom

 

new lemur boy

 

new lemurs group

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

QuikPic: Cassandra

September 8th, 2013

Here is a great picture of Cassandra I took in the mid-afternoon recently. It was in the high 70′s and mostly cloudy, but as soon as the clouds parted,  she took full advantage of a great sun bathing spot!

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPic: a college memory

October 15th, 2012

When I left home for college (more than 25 years ago) my parents (my mom) had towels made for me with my name on it- one blue and one yellow, each with a script ”Sherry” embroidered on it.

Old towels never die, they just get re-purposed.

 

Cassandra waking up from sedation in my “sherry” towel from college

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Cassandra explores the vet room

September 1st, 2012

Ring Tailed Lemur training is going well! Here’s where we were last time Lemurs in Crates.

Cassandra sitting on the exam table

Last week with  guidance from Julie Grimes and assistance from our Vet Keeper Katy, I let Cassandra, our female ring tailed lemur, out in the vet room. The idea was to let her out of her crate into a vet room cage. This is where she will spend a little time on the day of her physical. In training terms we are desensitizing her to the vet room. After awhile, I asked her to go back into the crate- but she was quite curious and had other plans. Cassandra slowly made her way around the vet room checking things out. Lycus was in the vet room (he stayed in his crate), she spent some time visiting with him and even explored the cage on her own again. Then she climbed the vet room cages for a couple minutes, she made her way down quickly for a couple craisins. When it was time to go back into her crate- she did!

She went back in the crate on her own. Success!!!

It took some time and patience but seeing her explore in such a stress free manner was quite amazing! Katy was great back-up when I ran out of training treats and Julie helped keep me calm when I began to worry. Overall it was a great experience for all of us and we plan to do it a few more time before lemur physicals in Sept.

Katy snapped a few pictures too.

Cassandra checks out the vet room cage

Cassandra visiting Lycus in his crate

exploring

Climbing up

Cassandra exploring

Queen of the vet room

Climbing down

Notice Max’s neck cradle?

the power of craisins

Cassandra reaching out for Lycus

 

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  1. Have you ever considered writing an e-book or guest authoring on other websites? I have a blog based on the same subjects you discuss and would really like to have you share some stories/information. I know my audience would value your work. If you’re even remotely interested, feel free to send me an email.

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Training Progress

June 7th, 2012

I posted in March about my progress training the Ring Tailed Lemurs. At that point they were staying in their crate for about 4 minutes on average. I’ve worked up to about 10 minutes, including taking them right outside of the lemur house. Yay! But here is where it gets tricky- we spoke with our vet about giving them one or two treats the morning of their physicals. Since the lemurs have to be sedated, she does not want them to have any food in their system at all. The reason is -they could aspirate during the procedure. Which is when someone vomits and then inhales the regurgitated food into their lungs, which could cause death so……… we do not want that to happen!!

The problem is keeping the crate a positive thing for them and without getting a treat for going into the crate how can we do this?

I discussed with Julie Grimes my options. She suggested that I start mixing up how I reward the lemurs for going into the crate. Up until today I was treating them as soon as I shut the door and if they were in the crate for several minutes they received a treat after 1-2 minutes. And another treat for coming out of the crate. So with Julie’s advice- today I asked them to go into their crates- which they did. I shut the door and clicked (used my clicker) but did not treat them. After a short amount of time they were let out of the crates and given a bigger reward than usual. Cassandra and Satyrus did fine with this but Lycus started reaching through the crate, possibly wondering where his treat was. The idea of this is to make it so they will not be able to predict when they get a treat for the door being shut and when they get lots of treats for being in the crate. So that on the day of their physicals in October, it won’t be a huge shock to them that they didn’t receive a treat for going into the crate.

Satyrus and Cassandra in their crates during training

 

Both coming out of their crates

 

Lycus going into his crate

 

Lycus: Just for fun!

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  1. Hi Museum of Life and Science Blog writers,

    In light of World Oceans Day, I wanted to pass along an infographic from Oceans Initiative that I thought would be a good fit for your readers. The graphic takes a look at how container ships, oil tankers, and other large travel vessels are producing noise that disrupts vital whale activity and daily life.

    Let me know if you run into any questions. Thanks all – Have a great weekend!

    Infographic: The Secret to a Sound Ocean
    http://www.oceansinitiative.org/2012/06/08/happy-world-oceans-day-the-secret-to-a-sound-ocean/

    Best,
    Kelsey
    kcox@columnfivemedia.com

    Posted by Kelsey

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Looking Out for Lemurs in Madagascar

March 8th, 2012

This article is written by PhD student Jenna Pyle, who is studying with Drs. Michelle Sauther and Frank Cuozzo (Lemur Biology Project.). They are doing their research at the Beza Mahafaly Reserve in Madagascar. Really, it’s worth reading. (Click here).

A group of ring-tailed lemurs forage for food and bask in the sunlight at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve. (Photo/Michelle Sauther).

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  1. Thanks for sharing Jenna’s article here. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

  2. My brother recommended I would possibly like this blog. He was totally right. This post actually made my day. You cann’t believe just how much time I had spent for this information! Thanks!

    Posted by Karl Hassenger

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

What makes a lemur a lemur?

December 29th, 2011

In my last lemur post you learned the differences between them and other primates. But what makes a lemur a lemur and what exactly is a tooth comb? Or a grooming claw? Or a reflecting tapetum?

Even though lemurs are endemic to Madagascar and the Comoros Islands they can be quite different amongst themselves. Lemurs come in all sizes from the 1 oz pygmy mouse lemur to the 15 lbs Indri and Diademed Sifaka lemurs.

Pygmy Mouse Lemur

Diademed Sifaka

Indri Sifaka

 

Depending on the species of lemur they can be either diurnal or nocturnal.  Typically nocturnal species are on the smaller side and solitary whereas diurnal species are larger and live in groups.

Lemurs are arboreal- spending most of their time in the trees and large bushes as opposed to terrestrial- spending most of their time on the ground, with exceptions of course. The biggest exception is the ring tailed lemurs- who are mostly terrestrial and live in large groups which helps them stay protected from predators. Power in numbers! Here at the museum we have two exhibits- one showing arboreal red ruffed lemurs who are almost always sitting high on their branches and then the large yard for the more terrestrial ring tailed lemurs.

So what about the tooth comb——> it is a very unique grooming adaptation. The front teeth of their lower jaw forms a ‘comb’ which they use to groom themselves and others in their group.

Toothcomb

A grooming claw on the second digit of their foot is elongated and used for scratching.

Grooming claw

And the light reflecting layer behind the retina of the eye is called a tapetum lucidum which helps lemurs see in the dark.

Leap, hop, and jump- Lemurs have long tails that help them balance while jumping and hopping but did you know that long tails also help them communicate while traveling in groups. Ring tailed lemurs keep their tails held high in the air- like flags, while traveling, with the dominant female leading the troop. However these tails are not prehensile -meaning they can not hang by them like other primates.

Spider monkey hanging by it’s prehensile tail
A troop traveling with their tails high in the air for communication

Lemurs also communicate via scent, facial expressions, and with vocalizations. Check back soon to learn more about lemur communication.

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  1. I’m always reminded of Dr. Seuss when I see these creatures…

    Posted by Wendy

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