Posts Tagged ‘Satyrus’

by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

QuikPic: Caption Contest

March 20th, 2013

Satyrus and an empty dixie cup

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  1. “Hello, Watson? Come here; I need you!”

    Posted by Janell
  2. I can hear the ocean.

    Posted by Wendy
  3. Bummer….Kimberly’s frozen fruit popsicle treat is all gone!!

    Posted by dj

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

More fun with Watermelon!

July 31st, 2012

 

Here are Cassandra and son Satyrus, two of our Ring Tailed Lemurs, enjoying frozen watermelon on a very hot day!

This teepee tree is used for enrichment

New keeper Jessi designed this teepee tree with former intern Casey

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Training works!

March 10th, 2011

Satyrus

Thanks for reading the sign Satyrus but it is intended for visitors.

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  1. Director Comment :

    Good job teaching him to read upside-down Kimberly!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Keeper
I am most famous here in the animal department for "expanding" the barred owl exhibit, clogging the wolf pool, and splitting my pants. My other less notorious work, since 2003, includes keeping, purchasing our animal supplies, coordinating our volunteers, and managing our animal enrichment program.
Find me training the lemurs or in other various animal enclosures Monday through Friday, or at the grocery store on Wednesdays, when I shop for produce!

Explore the Wild (in the lemur exhibit)

September 9th, 2009

I was feeding the lemurs a while ago, spreading their food around the exhibit on the rocks, the branches and in crooks of trees, and nearly plopped a piece of banana -smeared chow onto this little guy!

He’s a gray tree frog. I had the camera with me, and thought I should get a shot of how well he camouflages himself.

I had already let the lemurs into the exhibit, and Satyrus was following me around, trying to anticipate my every food placing move when he lept up onto the tree (while I was trying to take another picture!!) and put his big old lemur foot right on my new friend.

Satyrus’s foot.

I quickly shooed him off, and Mr. Invisible, who was not smooshed, but probably just wondering why it suddenly got so dark and smelly, jumped to a leaf to avoid our commotion.

I looked him up in our reptile and amphibian book to make sure that’s what he was (and because keeper Kent was not around to confirm) and learned some new things: this frog has bright orange legs (on the concealed surfaces) and is not often seen on the ground or at water’s edge outside of breeding season.
They blend in so well that their presence is often only known by their call ( a flute like trill, similar to a red-bellied woodpecker), or of course, if you’re scattering lemur chow!

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  1. hahaha that's a good story!

    Posted by Marilyn
  2. Wonderful! I've never seen one of these! In Galveston,TX, where I lived for many years, we'd have green tree frogs and anoles and pink spotted geckos all over the screens and glass doors at night eating the bugs attracted to our house lights.

    Posted by Wendy A

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