Posts Tagged ‘surgery’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Toad Surgery

February 4th, 2013

Last week, while checking on the animals at the end of the day, a keeper noticed something amiss with the toad:

The gelatinous bubble between the toad’s legs should not be there.

Dr. Lewbart happened to be visiting with some veterinary students- what perfect timing for us to have an expert on grounds for some sort of prolapse with this toad.

Dr. Lewbart (gray vest), with 4th year veterinary students from NCSU, works on the toad.

 We use a product called MS222 to put the toad to sleep. We put the toad and MS222 in water. Once the toad is ready, the work can begin.

toad, “sleeping” for its surgery to repair the prolapse

 The stitches came out yesterday and we’ll hope this was a one-time thing!

Join the conversation:

  1. Did this fix the problem permanently or could it recur? I’m glad the toad is OK!

    Posted by Shawntel
  2. Director Comment :

    We’re hoping this is a permanent fix, but we really don’t know.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.

QuikPost: Sea Turtle Surgery

August 29th, 2012

A very long time ago, Keeper Larry posted about Dr. Lewbart. Recently, I was talking with my roommate and she told me about this article. When I read the article I recognized the name of the Dr. and thought it was very interesting.

SEA TURTLE SURGERY

(Allen Breed, Associated Press)

 

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Hi Jill,

    We recently published an article that you may be interested in entitled, “10 Colleges Saving Our Endangered Species” (http://www.thebestcolleges.org/10-colleges-saving-our-endangered-species/).

    After having followed your blog for a while, I feel that this article would align well with your blog’s subject matter. I thought perhaps you’d be interested in sharing this article with your readers?
    Thanks, and keep up the great blogging!

    Sincerely,
    Dollie Todd

    Posted by Dollie Todd

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Salamander Surgery: a new year with a little less

December 31st, 2011

One of our tiger salamanders will be a little smaller in 2012. A couple of weeks ago one of our tiger salamanders had surgery. For MANY months now we have been trying to treat and cure a growth on the salamander’s tail (Dr. Vanderford described the growth as a Chronic granulomatous inflammation). We have not been succesful, so it was finally time to amputate. Amputation sounds drastic and scary. All went well and the salamander is recovering just as hoped and expected.

 

 

We’ve written blog  posts about surgeries we’ve done on other animals. Take a look if you want:

red wolf

ferret

degu

Yona bear

Chummix Goat

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Will the salamander’s tail regrow like a lizard’s tail does? (Think I have heard that about lizard tails??)

    Posted by DJ
  2. Director Comment :

    Good question: no re-growing of the tail DJ.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

What a day!

August 31st, 2011

The day is done- it’s midnight, or a few minutes after, so the day is finally over and it’s Wednesday! The short story is there is too much going on!  We learned late Monday that construction on our walk-in freezer would start Tuesday morning. The Keepers quickly emptied out the room and stored all the freezers on the hall to start the day. Then we got a couple truckloads of Farmyard bedding. Tuesday was also Vet. Rounds, so Dr. Vanderford was here. Kristen stopped by with Libby to say hi too!

Dr. Vanderford holds Mason, while Annie holds Libby

Ladybelle, one of our ferrets, was vomiting the end of last week and radiographs showed a mass in her abdomen. Dr. Erik Clary, a board certified surgeon, came by in the afternoon for surgery. We’re so thankful to Dr. Clary for donating his time for Ladybelle’s surgery! We’re hoping the biopsy and other tests come back with good news.

The end of ferret surgery.

Also, our alligators are heading back to South Carolina to be swapped out for smaller ones. I picked them up about two years ago. It’s time to head back to Alligator Adventure, return the alligators to them and have them loan us four more. We packed them up so I wouldn’t have to do it at 4 AM.

under-the-bed storage containers work great for transporting alligators!

Ladybelle needs to be checked on so Katy came back at 10 PM to help with treatments.

Ladybelle in her warm box to sleep in

 

 

Katy’s PJ bottoms! (very cute)

 

I’ll be back in 5 hours to pick up the alligators and take off for SC.  (Karyn is coming to keep me company and she’ll probably tweet about our travels).

Join the conversation:

  1. Big Thanks to Dr Clary!!!

    Posted by kimberly
  2. Never a dull moment in the Animal department!

    Posted by leslie

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by , Keeper
I'm extremely excited to be working at the Museum since October 2010. My favorite part of this job- besides working with the animals- is listening to all of the Keeper stories, I hear a new one each day. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, belly dancing, and vegan cooking.
I work Sunday through Thursday. I can be found mostly behind the scenes or training the Ring Tail Lemurs.

Kindness is not out-dated

August 15th, 2011

I recently had unexpected surgery. The museum staff is like a big family and many people have offered their help. In lieu of cooked meals (because I’m vegan and didn’t want to make a kind gesture an annoying task) many people donated money and Sherry was kind enough to make several grocery store trips to load me up with pre-packaged goodies for my recovery. I honestly didn’t expect anything and was quite tickled with the kindness of my co-workers.

Holy vegan soups!

Want some nuts with that?

 

I just wanted to thank the museum staff for their positive thoughts, kind words, and donations. And a super HUGE thank you to all of the Animal Keepers and Volunteers for covering my shifts, picking up things I drop, handing me things from the top or bottom shelf, lifting-reaching-carrying for me, and for keeping me laughing and smiling through all of this.  Thanks guys! I feel very lucky to be part of this team.

Join the conversation:

  1. So when you’re feeling 100% better we’ll get some vegan cookies, right? :-) Which reminds me, I have a chocolate cherry vegan cookie recipe that you should have (unless you’re one of those people that doesn’t like chocolate). They are amazing!

    Posted by Leslie
  2. Keeper Comment :

    They sound amazing!! I want them right now!! i am definately not one of those people who doesn’t like chocolate.

    Posted by Kimberly Lawson

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Degu Surgery

May 24th, 2011

We don’t want Degu babies, so we neutered our male Degu, Luis.  However, we thought we might be too late with the surgery - AND WE WERE!  Florencia was already pregnant by the time we neutered Luis.

Take a look at the photos below from the neutering, and tomorrow we’ll post some photos or videos of the 6 baby Degus that were born on May 23!

Luis degu gets anesthesia

Dr. Vanderford gets ready to begin (Luis is there-look closely)

sterile field and yes, that's a degu penis.

getting oxygen to help wake Luis up.

Join the conversation:

  1. Wow, those degus work fast! What will happen to the pups?

    Posted by Natalie
  2. Director Comment :

    Some of the pups will stay here and the others will head out to good homes.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Yona’s surgery- it’s over and she is back

September 23rd, 2010

Yona has now been back at the Museum for about 1.5 days now and is recovering from her surgery to remove a bone fragment in her elbow.  Read an article and see better pictures than below by the News & Observer- the photos are way better than mine (see the photo gallery for all the pictures).

A few photos I took are below, as well as a couple of Yona back at the Museum. We’ll keep you posted as to when she will go back on exhibit to be with the rest of the bears.

It was dark when Kent, Katy and I went to crate Yona. You can't see, but Kent is on the right and Katy is on the left.

Yona on the surgery Table

Yona's leg was completely shaved

There’s probably about another month of really good hair growth left before winter sets in. It will be interesting to see how quickly her hair grows in!

the bone fragment had to be removed in pieces- it was too big to come out whole.

Yona has no issues crushing her tub

She is not very hesitant to use that arm!

Join the conversation:

  1. Keeper Comment :

    Cute pictures, Sherry! She is quite adorable, even in her stubborn “I don’t wanna take my pill!” kind of way. Watching her roll around playing with toys, and splashing around in her water tub during her recovery has been amusing!

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Minor surgery for Chummix Goat

July 9th, 2010

Chummix Goat is fine- really. Keepers noticed a few weeks ago a mass under is armpit.  It didn’t drain like it was an abscess from one of his vaccines.  So, we scheduled an early morning time for Dr. Cannedy to come to remove the mass and send it off for testing so we can learn that everything is well with our big noisy goat.

Below are photos from this morning’s procedure.  Chummix is up and about and eating and acting as he usually does. The only thing  you might notice is his shaved arm pit.

Dr. Cannedy and his cool truck: vet-office-on-wheels

Sorry, I coudln't resist the butt shot photo. Chummix is behind there somewhere

Sleepy and being prepped for lump removal

The mass- the size of a large grape.

Join the conversation:

  1. Do you think the mass will grow back?

    Posted by Shawntel
  2. Director Comment :

    Good question Shawntel. We have to wait for the test results to tell us what the lump is/was. Once we know that, we’ll be able to gauge how likely it is to return.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Yona Update

July 5th, 2010

It’s been almost one month since Yona had her day at the vet school.  Just about all of the reports are in and the talking continues to determine what the best course of action will be. We will almost definitely be doing surgery in late September when the weather cools to remove the bone fragment from her arm (her medial coronoid process – a bone in her elbow- has fragmented). As always, we’ll keep you updated.

Check out the video to see a little of Yona’s vet school visit.

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Creature Feature: Red Wolf Surgery Part 3

June 10th, 2009
This video is the third and final part of a three part series. Watch the first and second part or see all three in the same video.
YouTube Preview Image
Well, a lot has happened with red wolf #1227 in the last week or so. Yesterday’s video showed you the procedure of the mass being removed, and today’s video will allow you to see what happened to #1227 after the surgery and how she is doing now.

#1227 arrived at the museum in November of 2008. Before coming here, she lived at the Texas Zoo for three years where she was paired up with another male red wolf in hopes that they would have pups. Unfortunately, that never happened. So the Red Wolf SSP decided to match her with a different male (#1369) here at the museum. These two red wolves are considered to be valuable genetically, so it would be great if they successfully bred together. That did not happen this year, but we are keeping our fingers crossed for next year!

We were told about some of #1227′s behaviors by the keepers at the Texas Zoo when she came to us. Apparently, she was known for running off with the keepers’ tools if they were left unattended with the keepers in the exhibit. Although she hasn’t done that with us, she is much more bold than the male and will come within 15 feet of us while we are in the exhibit. She is very curious about what we are doing and what sort of enrichment we might have for her! In the morning, when she hears us drive up, she will run down to the viewing area to see if we have anything for her. She is also a bug chaser, which is quite amusing to watch (you may even see a bit of that in part 3 of the video). She has been a very enjoyable wolf to have, and her funny behaviors make us all smile!

You can come by and visit her at the museum to see how she is doing. We will also post updates on the blog with whatever actions we might take in the future with her.

Join the conversation:

  1. you guys are awesome. marilyn, remember when you told me you didn't like speaking for an audience?! clearly you were made for it. this video series was fantastic.

    Posted by Leiana
  2. Excellent series of videos. The surgical explanations added greatly to the video of the surgery. The medical staff is to be commended. I also have enjoyed the blog updates by Marilyn, which adds to the story of this red wolf.

    Posted by Anonymous

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