Posts Tagged ‘transfers’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

traveling companions

November 18th, 2012

I was chatting with someone recently about my trip to Ohio to pick up our new red wolf, # 1414.  Afterwards,  I began thinking of what other animals I have shared my vehicle with.  Here’s a partial list of my travel companions over the years.

  • red wolves. Besides the Ohio pick up, last month Aaron and I had our road trip to Atlanta to get #1369 on his plane out to Tacoma.   WV and NY were probably the longest trips, each over 500 miles each direction. Many years ago I met keepers from Florida on  I-95 in Georgia and did a wolf exchange at a gas station.   (Click here to see a video of former keepers Kristen and Cassidy picking up a former red wolf – 1227- from the airport.
  • black bears- Gus  and Yona, to be specific. I almost didn’t make it back with Gus as the Wildlife Official transferring Gus from his crate to mine was a bit casual. Volunteer Annie was with me and almost had a heart attack. Yona was transferred to my van in the parking lot of WalMart in Johnson City, Tennessee.
  • saltwater fish (I’ve probably made 5 trips to the beach over the years for fish, and then to airports to get them. We don’t have saltwater fish on exhibit anymore, so no more beach trips).
  • snakes- I picked up a couple a few years ago from the Dan Nicholas Park Nature Center.
  • Alligators: Former Keepers Daniel and Larry did most of the Florida Alligator exchanges, but I’ve had 8 alligators share my ride to and from South Carolina.

The list goes on and on: woodchuck, opossums, owls, hawks, lemurs, bobcat, raccoon, goats… I wonder what animal will be next???

 

Join the conversation:

  1. How old was Gus at that time? I wish I had a photo from the last bear feeding I attended when Gus was upright on the gate behind you. His paws and height are so impressive!!

    Posted by dj
  2. Director Comment :

    DJ: We picked Gus up in July. He was about 6 months old (less than 40 pounds too). It is amazing when he stands up tall!!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Red Wolf update- 1227 is feisty and strong

September 18th, 2010

I emailed my friend and Red Wolf Contact at the NC  Zoo to see how female red wolf 1227 was doing.  I drove her there on September 8th. (I was kept company on my drive by Volunteer Annie). Below is the email I received from Chris yesterday:

She sure is feisty.  She went about 48 hours without eating but now she is eating well and appears to be gaining weight.  We did a quarantine exam on her and she was the same weight as what was written in her record but that was over a week ago now.  We where able to do an ultrasound of her repo track during her exam and everything appears good and healthy with the limited amount we can see with ultrasound.  Her blood work all came back WNL.

Did I mention that she is feisty?  She fought me the entire time I was restraining her for the exam.  We had to anesthetize her to complete the exam.  I kept trying to tell her that she is only 40 pounds and I am 230 pounds and she could not win but for some reason that logic did not work on her.

Overall she is doing great and we can’t wait to get her out of that room and into her new off exhibit pen with the 3 year old male.

So, all is well with 1227 and the bonus for me is knowing that Chris gets a little payback. About 10 years ago I picked up female red wolf 918 from the zoo. As soon as Chris locked the door on the crate he started to mischievously laugh. He then enlightened me to all the issues the wolf had at the zoo, laughed again, and said good luck.  Female 918 never gave us any trouble, and even had pups here with male 953. I hope Chris has the same good fortune with 1227!

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Crazy busy and Goodbye (to a wolf)

September 4th, 2010

Things have been so busy here I don’t even know where to begin. Many staff have been off- (on vacation, at a wedding, at a Bar Mitzvah, presenting at the AAZK conference) and just as we were taking Cassandra off of the critical watch list (she’s been doing great), our female wolf, 1227, was found in bad shape two weeks ago and has been recovering from her injuries off exhibit. (She appears to have suffered some abuse from her mate- you are welcome to ask questions about this if you want- I am happy to share more details).

I mentioned that she would be transferred and now that she’s doing better it’s time to send her to her new home at the NC Zoo. She’ll leave on September 8. She’s had her share of issues that we’ve had to deal with, including a tumor that had to be removed from her chest.

This will leave our male, 1369, alone until the end of September or first week in October when we can get our next female, a 7 year old (1287) from Roger Williams Park Zoo in RI. Hopefully, our new pairing will be successful. In the meantime, when you come to visit you’ll see the male wolf alone- but looking quite handsome as he always does.

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

It’s sad to see them go

September 30th, 2008

Yesterday, I took our two red wolves to their new home at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge has an area that is situated far away from the main road, where there are nicely wooded and grassy holding pens for keeping captive wolves that are currently not being moved to museums or zoos. But our two boys have a greater purpose for being sent to the refuge, because they are known to be good howlers. That might sound funny, but some wolves howl more than others. At the refuge, they have wolf howling programs where people can visit the refuge at night and howl at the wolves from a distance and have them howl back. The hope is that our boys will add a lot to the programs by showing off their amazing “hoooowls” for all of the visitors!

Here are some pictures of the boys being released into their new home. Alpha wolf came out of the carrier right away and started checking the area out. Blind wolf also came out right away and started sniffing around. I was surpirised to see how quickly blind wolf started to investigate his new surroundings. It seems as though they will both make a fine transition, and the people at the refuge will keep us updated on their progress. Although it is exciting to think about getting a possible breeding pair at the museum, I think it is safe to say that our two boys will be sorely missed by all the keepers here. It has been sad to go past the exhibit today and not have them there.

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  1. Driving by the empty exhibit is very sad…I miss watching them run along the fence first thing in the morning and I miss their howling…I did get to hear them howling 2 days before they left. There were many sirens going off and the boys were howling like crazy!! I tried to sneak up on them to watch, but Alpha spotted me and stopped, but Blind wolf continued to howl, it was so cool to see and hear…I will miss them very much.

    Posted by Katy

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