Posts Tagged ‘Ursula’

by , Keeper
I've been at the museum for many years now. I spend most of my time behind-the-scenes in the Vet room. You might catch me out and about with one of our many veterinarians checking on the animals.
When I'm not hanging out with one of our vets I'm usually in the Vet room running a fecal looking for intestinal parasites! If I'm not up to my elbows in poo you'll find me at the computer updating the health records of our animals or preparing for Vet Rounds.

A Look Back … Part 1

June 24th, 2014

Let’s take a look back at some of the goings on in the Animal Department. Some of these critters have moved on to further their careers and education, some of them have retired, some of them have passed away and some of them are still with us in the Animal Department, just older and wiser now! I have 10 years worth of memories and pictures of all the happenings in the Department… here are a few of my favorites! Keep your eyes peeled for many more to come!!!

Ursula

Ursula

Yona post surgery

Yona post surgery

Mikey

Mikey

Jill post surgery

Jill post surgery

Annie and Sonny

Annie and Sonny

Pig

Pig

Gizmo

Gizmo

Templeton

Templeton

Young Gus

Young Gus

1227 Red Wolf

1227 Red Wolf

Beaker

Beaker

Sonny and Cher

Sonny and Cher

Kerby in Q

Kerby in Q

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Keeper
I graduated from NCSU(go pack) and have worked in the animal department for about 8 years. Some of my favorites include ferrets and birds. I am also known for my weird obsession with Boba Fett.
I work Tuesday-Saturday in either the Farmyard or inside the main building behind the scenes.
Tags: , ,

Ursula slide show

November 5th, 2011

I was supposed to post this video the other week but I ran into some technical difficulties with the video. So, as promised…

If you have been keeping current with the blog, you have probably read about our bear Ursula. It has been a draining, sad and all around horrible week.

I am personally grateful for the amount of support we have received from people in the public and around the museum. Speaking for myself, it has been a roller coaster of emotions. Each one of us keepers deals with this kind of stuff in his/her own way and I just happen to be one of those people who can cry at the drop of a hat when we lose an animal.

When I first began working here six years ago, Urs was just getting out of her cranky stage of life and coming into her sweet and lazy self that I will miss greatly.

Below is a slide show of pictures I have found of Urs and she even got her own musical score arranged by one of our old keepers, Erin Brown.

YouTube Preview Image

 

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Volunteer
I like volunteering to work with the animals and the Keepers (both are quite exciting and entertaining). I speak several languages including chicken. In another life I teach physics, but mostly I just love to learn (anything!) and be outdoors. When not volunteering I like to watch the bears and photograph around Explore the Wild. Follow me on Twitter @ktraphagen

Ursula Gets Spoiled

October 22nd, 2011

On Monday, October 17th, Ursula received some special spoiling from the Animal Keepers. This video shows her enjoying the last frozen watermelon of the season (many thanks to those of you who donated watermelons to the Museum this summer). She also clearly loves the marshmallows and acorns she’s been given. The video is about 2.5 minutes, but worth watching every second (at least that’s what I think!). Pay attention to her large paws, how she wrinkles her nose, and how carefully she maneuvers the small marshmallows and acorns. Can you see how long her tongue is?

YouTube Preview Image

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Videos of Ursula

October 19th, 2011

Here’s a couple of videos that were taken of Ursula over the last couple of years. in this first video, there was a particularly heavy snow that we got one winter and one of our previous keepers, Cassidy, got some video of Urse walking around and digging in the snow. Her thick coat made her seem oblivious to the cold weather and snow that was still falling at the time (you can see some of the snow on her back).

YouTube Preview Image

This next video was taken  in the spring/summer 2009, and Urse was enjoying a swim. Urse was always a fan of the water and she often liked to wade in the pools. In the house where we have large tubs of water for the bears, she would often times be seen by keepers splashing the water everywhere and seemingly having a great time in the process. These endearing moments are just a couple of things that we will miss about her.

Three years ago I posted a Creature Feature on Ursula talking about her favorite foods, her antics as a youngster, and moments she had with keepers and enrichment. You can click here if you’d like to read that post and learn more about Ursula.

In the last couple of days, the keepers have received great support and kind words from the other museum staff and it is very much appreciated. All of us here at the museum have our own favorite memories of Urse, whether it be from behind the scenes while caring for her or from bear overlook while watching her eat, sleep, swim, interact with enrichment, or tell the pesky younger bears to go away. I think it is safe to say that Urse will have a special place in many of our hearts for a long time to come. If you have a special memory of Urse while visiting the museum please feel free to share it with us in the comment section.

YouTube Preview Image

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Goodbye Ursula

October 18th, 2011

There’s difficult and yucky parts of everyone’s job, but today, and the days leading up to today, are among the hardest. 

Ursula

I posted about Ursula in July, and told you about her leg issues. We rested and medicated her for several months. Many of you were kind enough to donate watermelons for her to take her medicines in.

Last week she took a huge turn for the worse. She’s been unable to stand up. While heartbreaking, the decision became clear to euthanize her.

These days are hardest on the Keepers for sure and everyone wants to know what they can do to help. Kind words, cards, drawings are always good. You can donate money in Ursula’s name to the Museum. We’ll use all funds to buy a new red barrel (enrichment). We had a red barrel that Urs interacted with TONS, amusing the keepers and guests for many hours.

Urs arrived at the Museum 20 years ago. She grew up at the Museum. I remember seeing her arrive on grounds in the back of a pick-up truck. It was the biggest cage I had ever seen.

We’ll post photos and videos of Urs the next few days for everyone to see so check back in.

 

 

Join the conversation:

  1. What a beautiful bear. Thinking of you all.

    Posted by Emily
  2. Whenever I look down at the scar on my finger I will think of Urs and smile!!! I’m so glad I had the opportunity to know her …she was an amazing bear and so very comical!!! I will miss her like crazy.

    Posted by Katy
  3. She will be missed. Her life was long and her life was good, she was loved by all. Her life was better than it would have been in somebodys back yard, in a cage or in the wild. Urs was a grand old bear and brought joy and wonderment to staff and visitors alike.

    Posted by Mike
  4. We were so sad to hear about Ursala’s passing, but happy we got to see her shorty before she died. She was a real beauty! Thanks for taking care of her and sharing her with the world :-)

    Posted by Kim
  5. rest in peace ursala

    Posted by anne and caleb
  6. I’ll really miss Urs. Thanks keepers, for taking such good care of her. “Hurray, hurray”- she was a great bear.

    Posted by Kristen
  7. hi team, i’m so sorry to hear about urs. she was a beautiful, amazing, fiesty-lady of a bear. it’s clear from knowing some of you – and from seeing the tribute on the blog – that she was well cared for and respected. thoughts are with you guys.

    Posted by Leiana

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Thanks for the watermelons

August 1st, 2011

We Tweeted and posted that we needed watermelons  for Ursula to take her medicine in. Over 30 have arrived thus far, and yesterday, the keepers must have had a little extra time as they made some art and animal enrichment out of it.

Chicken Little and lots of watermelons

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Can you still use some watermelons??? If so, I will bring a couple over this afternoon..

    MIke

    Posted by Mike
  2. Director Comment :

    We’d love more watermelons. Thanks Mike!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Ursula Update

July 13th, 2011

Ursula, our almost 21 year old American black bear, has had some lameness in her rear legs for awhile now.

 

Last week she seemed a bit gimpier. We pulled her off exhibit so we could medicate her and further evaluate her condition. We’ll keep you posted as things progress. Please send good vibes her way.

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Photos of Erin

March 4th, 2011

Erin was in the office yesterday eating leftover cake from Kristen’s Baby Shower and got some frosting on her chin.

It reminded me of other amusing photos I had of Erin so I thought I’d share.

The end-of-year animal department potluck features a grab-bag of presents. Some people think some of the items wrapped are not worth keeping (shocking, I know). I wrapped up a surplus saddle from one of the horses in the Play to Learn exhibit area and someone LEFT IT BEHIND. Erin worked hard to show Kristen ways in which the saddle could be adapted for use during pregnancy.

Erin trying to be creative with a saddle from a stuffed animal horse!

A couple years (yes, really) Erin, Larry, and I were scooping poop in the bear yard and I made asked Erin to test out Ursula’s bed for comfort. I think we made sure there was no poop in the bed before I shoved her in, but I cannot remember anymore!

Erin testing out Ursula's bed

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Yona meets the other bears

February 23rd, 2010

Things have gone pretty well with Yona meeting the other bears. (Remember, black bears are solitary by nature). Here’s the quick version, but come to any 2:00 Meet The Keeper program and you can talk to the Keepers first hand about what happened.

Sunday late afternoon we let Yona and Gus together in the house. It was fairly uneventful so we let Virginia and Mimi in too. Gus and Yona did some gentle play wrestling. After about an hour, we separated them for the night in preparation for letting Yona out into the exhibit Monday morning.

Monday around 8:45 we let Yona into an empty bear exhibit, where she could wander on her own. She stayed close to the house. We then decided to let Ursula into the exhibit. Urs did as expected- wandered around in search of food. Yona didn’t show much interest in wandering.

We then decided to let Gus, Mimi, and Virginia out. Mimi and Virginia wandered away eating food, but Gus hung back and spent time with Yona. They continued to play wrestle- Gus climbed to the top of the play structure repeatedly and Yona swatted at his feet.

Monday afternoon, all bears had access everywhere. 4 bears (all but Yona) laid in the yard and 1 bear (Yona) hung out in the house. I am sure she will eventually feel comfortable enough and head out, but for now, evidently there’s no place like home.
This morning, Tuesday, Cassidy reported that when given access to the exhibit, Yona immediately went out, would wrestle with Gus, and then would come back in. So, still venturing out a little more with time.

We’ll post photos and videos in the next few days, so stay tuned.

Join the conversation:

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Why The Difficulties for Yona (and the others)

January 17th, 2010

Yes, it’s true, no photos yet. I’m still in bed, but wanted to follow-up to my last post. I hope that people “get” what’s going on for Yona and the other bears. I assume some people would think Yona would be thrilled and the other bears would welcome her with open arms. Some elaboration to explain what’s going on.

Yona grew up being bottle fed by the same person and then living in the same exhibit at ABR with other young bears hoping to be released back to the wild. Then, she was packed up in small crates for almost 12 hours, and when she came out, she was in a totally new place: concrete walls, stonedust instead of dirt to walk on, no trees or bears next to her, different smells, sights, sounds.

I’m sure all this makes sense, but let’s go further. Bears are solitary animals. Bears only spend other time with bears when they are cubs: Mother bears raise their cubs (usually have one or two at a time) spending the first 18 months of the cubs’ life rearing them and teaching them life’s lessons. Hopefully, the cubs are quick and good learners and remember the skills they learned because around 18 months old Mom, before bedding down for winter and having her next cubs, kicks them out to be on their own for the rest of their life.

Our current bears- Ursula, Mimi, Virginia, and Gus- have all worked through the growing pains of living in captivity and working things out with each other. They establish a pecking order and learn each others behaviors and know how things work. There are “fights” at times: mostly these are “screaming” and “stomping” and “chasing”. This all works in captivity, and artificial environment, because we give lots of food and the bears learn- they’re smart.

Now, Yona is around, in sight and smell at this point, and is messing with this order.

There’s more to say about this, but enough with words. I hope this explains at least a little more. Please ask questions if you have any. All will eventually be fine, but the road ahead is long and will be trying.

Join the conversation:

  1. So nice to meet Yona today- thanks for letting us follow her progress through the blog… the Buckner family will enjoy watching her grow up!

    Posted by Tyler

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

If you have an account on any of the Museum's blogs, you can sign in with the same login to contribute to the discussion.

If you don't have an account, signing up is free and easy.