Posts Tagged ‘USFWS’

by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Help keep red wolves in the wild

July 9th, 2014

The USFWS will be reviewing the Red Wolf Recovery program. Check out this link to learn more: http://publicradioeast.org/post/red-wolf-recovery-program-under-review. The Center for Biological Diversity has started a petition to urge the USFWS to continue the reintroduction program and keep the last 100 red wolves in the wild.

Please Click here to see and sign the petition.

It would be sad to lose red wolves in the wild of NC – the last place on the planet they roam free.

 

Greg Dodge’s photo of our captive red wolf- 1414

 
  

Join the conversation:

  1. Thank you for the petition information. It would be a sad shame if these majestic red wolves are no longer protected under the reintroduction program.

    Posted by djcronce

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: Track the Pack

April 11th, 2014

Check out the USFWS red wolf recovery program Blog. 

There’s lots of great information – you can even learn about us :).

 

 

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Red Wolf links

November 13th, 2013

Becky Bartel of USFWS took this photo of our male, 1414

 

 

 

I’ve received a variety of information from USFWS  and RWC personnel in the past week or so about red wolves so I thought I would share with you. Click on any of the links below:

 

 

 

Becky Bartel’s photos of our wolves

A new post (about the Museum!) from the Blog of the USFWS Red Wolf Recovery Program

Washington Post article about red wolf  deaths from gunshot

RedWolf_QtrReport_FY13-04 (2)

 

 

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Second Red Wolf shot

November 1st, 2013

more bad news for the red wolves… a wolf was shot last week and now a second one this week. Here’s the link to previous information and a copy of today’s news release is below that.

http://www.fws.gov/southeast/news/2013/078.html

 

November 1, 2013

*Reward Offered for Information Regarding to a Second Red Wolf Death*

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is requesting assistance with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of a radio-collared red wolf that was recently found dead.  The federally protected wolf was found with a suspected gunshot wound on Wednesday, October 30, 2013, south of Roper and west of Lake Phelps in Washington County, North Carolina.

This is the second wolf found dead this week.

Anyone with information that directly leads to an arrest, a criminal conviction, a civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of property on the subject or subjects responsible for the suspected unlawful take of this red wolf may be eligible for a reward of up to $2,500.

A total of 10 red wolves have died since January 1, 2013.  Of those 10, three were struck and killed by vehicles, one died as a result of non-management related actions, and six were confirmed or suspected gunshot deaths.

The red wolf is protected under The Endangered Species Act. The maximum criminal penalties for the unlawful taking of a red wolf are one year imprisonment and $100,000 fine per individual.  Anyone with information on the death of this red wolf or any others, past or future, is urged to contact Resident Agent in Charge John Elofson at (404) 763-7959, Refuge Officer Frank Simms at (252) 216-7504, or North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Officer Robert Wayne at (252) 216-8225.

BACKGROUND:

The red wolf is one of the world’s most endangered wild canids.  Once common throughout the southeastern United States, red wolf populations have been decimated due to intensive predator control programs and loss of habitat.  A remnant population of red wolves was found along the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana.  After being declared an endangered species in 1967, efforts were initiated to locate and capture as many wild red wolves as possible.  Of the 17 remaining wolves captured by biologists, 14 became the founders of a successful zoo-based breeding program.  Consequently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared red wolves extinct in the wild in 1980.

The first litter of red wolves born in captivity occurred in 1977.  By 1987, enough red wolves were bred in captivity to begin a restoration program on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern North Carolina.  Since then, the experimental population area has expanded to include three national wildlife refuges, a Department of Defense bombing range, state-owned lands, and private property, spanning a total of 1.7 million acres.

About 100 red wolves roam their native habitats in five northeastern North Carolina counties.   Additionally, nearly 200 red wolves comprise the Species Survival Plan managed breeding program in sites across the United States, still an essential element of red wolf recovery.

The red wolf is one of two species of wolves in North America, the other being the gray wolf, (*Canis* *lupus*).  As their name suggests, red wolves are known for the characteristic reddish color of their fur most apparent behind the ears and along the neck and legs, but are mostly brown and buff colored with some black along their backs.  Intermediate in size to gray wolves and coyotes, the average adult red wolf weighs 45-80 pounds, stands about 26 inches at the shoulder and is about 4 feet long from the tip of the nose to the end of the tail.

Red wolves are social animals that live in packs consisting of a breeding pair and their offspring of different years, typically five to eight animals.  Red wolves prey on a variety of wild mammals such as raccoon, rabbit, white-tailed deer, nutria, and other rodents.  Most active at dusk and dawn, red wolves are elusive and generally avoid humans and human activity.

To learn more about red wolves and the Service’s efforts to recover them, please visit www.fws.gov/redwolf<http://www.fws.gov/redwolf>.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Red Wolf Recovery Program

P. O. Box 1969

Manteo, North Carolina 27954

Contact: David Rabon, 252-473-1132

 

Join the conversation:

  1. Prosecute to the fullest when they are found

    Posted by Theresa Smith
  2. Stop!

    Posted by Hilarie
  3. How very sad to see how many are lost to gun-shot :( Responsible hunters are absolutely sure of their targets. Irresponsible hunters should have their guns confiscated.

    Posted by Carrie
  4. and two more red wolves shot:
    November 15, 2013

    *Federal Officials Request Assistance Regarding Two More Red Wolves Missing or Dead*

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is requesting assistance with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of two more radio-collared red wolves in two separate locations south of Columbia, in
    Tyrrell County, North Carolina. One federally protected wolf’s body was found with an apparent gunshot wound on Tuesday, November 12, 2013. In a separate location in the same county on the same day, a red wolf radio collar was discovered with evidence that it had been cut off.

    Anyone with information that directly leads to an arrest, a criminal conviction, a civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of property on the subject or subjects responsible for the suspected unlawful take of a red wolf may be eligible for a reward of up to $2,500

    Posted by sherry

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: red wolf quarterly report

May 8th, 2013

I get sent the red wolf quarterly report from USFWS. Here’s the link to the most recent report:

RW recovery report. 3.13

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by , Keeper
I've been at the museum since 2010. I love to read and learn; it's rare that a day goes by at work when I'm not suppressing the urge to spew out something cool I just learned to my coworkers. In my spare time, I play the 'cello, snuggle my dog and reminisce about snowmen and Nor'easters.
I work Sunday through Thursday. You can find me raking the Farmyard in the morning or training the donkey and dwarf goats in the afternoon.

Meet A Biologist: Christina Kocer

August 15th, 2012
Christina Kocer

Photo Credit: CT DEEP

Meet Christina Kocer, the White-Nose Syndrome National Assistant Coordinator (and Northeast Regional Coordinator) for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Christina works with BATS! Specifically, she works with people, bats, and a newly discovered disease called White-Nose Syndrome (WNS). I asked her a few questions about her job; her answers are in blue text.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is it that you do?

As a WNS coordinator, I work closely with state, federal, and academic institutions, as well as non-governmental partners involved with WNS research and response, specifically those within the 13 states that make up the northeast region. I coordinate research, assist in the development of protocols, management plans, as well as research priorities, procedures, and policies. I review research proposals and coordinate contracting and grant funding processes and paperwork. I often facilitate conference calls with state agency and other agency biologists to discuss regional concerns, needs, and issues. I also respond to researcher and public inquiries about bats and WNS investigations. I assist agency biologists with WNS surveillance and monitoring in the field, including conducting hibernacula and maternity roost surveys.

inspecting a wing

Photo credit: MDC/Bruce Schuette Tri-Colored Bat with WNS (white fluffy stuff on its nose)

 

What’s the most exciting part of your job?

WNS is a newly emergent disease of hibernating bats that has resulted in an unprecidented population declines within a very short amount of time. It is an extremely challenging, frustrating, and fascinating problem that quickly brought together a wide range of state and federal agency biologists, university researchers,and non-governmental organizations from around the world to address this wildlife crisis. The diversity of expertise needed, from mycologists [scientists who study fungus] to physiologists and wildlife biologists to cavers, has been incredible. It is exciting to be a part of this response that is constantly changing and evolving with new research findings. Great progress has been made in understanding this complicated disease in very such a short amount of time.

 

Little Brown Bat

Photo Credit: CT DEEP Little Brown Bat with wing ID band

Why study bats?

Bats are typically misunderstood and tend to envoke fear in the public however, these fears are often unfounded. Bats are very beneficial creatures that need to be protected, and not feared. They are the primary predator of night-flying insects, including many agricultural pests. WNS has decimated populations of these animals and they need our protection. One of the few positive things that has come out of WNS is a new and renewed interest in bats by the public as a result of expanded education and outreach about these animals and WNS.

 

 

Christina Kocer

Photo Credit: USFWS Christina measuring bat wing

Bat Facts:

  • An estimated 5.7-6.7 MILLION bats have died as a result of White-Nose Syndrome. Mortality rates vary by site and species, but have approached 100% in some areas for some species.
  • WNS has been confirmed in 19 states (including North Carolina) and 4 Canadian Provinces. The fungus that causes WNS, Geomyces destructans, has been detected in 2 additional states.

Questions for Christina? Ask in the comments section and I’ll pass them along to her.

Want to learn more about White-Nose Syndrome? Check out the WNS website at http://www.WhiteNoseSyndrome.org 

Join the conversation:

  1. Thank you for posting this….I can’t imagine not seeing neighborhood bats at twilight and dawn because of WNS.

    Posted by dj
  2. Keeper Comment :

    You’re welcome! If you have any questions (even if they’re silly), just ask. There are a lot of neighborhoods that no longer have bats due to WNS, and that means more mosquitoes and moths for us people to deal with!

    Posted by Sarah Van de Berg
  3. just before midnight Dec 31,2013 I had an unexpected visitor in the form of a bat in my bed room. I was very surprised thinking that bats hibernated all winter.We usually get at least one bat in the house every year but never in winter. Should I be concerned or will It find its way out? We generally leave the doors open until we see them leave but it is way too cold now in Allegheny County, Western Pa. Never fear, I will not touch it!

    Posted by Alice Lucas
  4. reentered email address

    Posted by Alice Lucas
  5. Director Comment :

    Good for you to be cautious around these amazing creatures. Bats, and any animals, may very well need assistance finding their way back out of tricky situations. Bats do hibernate, but some are awoken. This typically does not bode well for the individual that wakes too soon.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: red wolf article

July 13th, 2010

A lengthy and inclusive article about red wolves and the issues they face was in the Charlotte Observer  Sunday. Click here to read it, or click on the link below.

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