Posts Tagged ‘Videos’

by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

QuikPost: Ah, that refreshing watermelon

July 27th, 2012

Only 7 days away from National Watermelon Day! Personally, I’m glad there is a day for everyone to celebrate watermelon. I think it is one of the most refreshing foods you can eat on a hot summer day. Many of our animals seem to find it refreshing (or at least enjoyable), as well.

Check out the video below of some of our indoor animals (and maybe even a keeper) enjoying some yummy watermelon. And don’t worry, Sherry, I put the keeper up to these shenanigans. She doesn’t always steal the animals’ watermelon!;)

Make sure to visit the museum next Friday, August 3rd so that you can see our animals in action as they gobble down some juicy and delightful watermelons at many of the keeper programs that will be held that day.

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Join the conversation:

  1. Awesome video! Makes me want some yummy watermelon. Good job Marilyn!

    Posted by Ranger Ro
  2. Keeper Comment :

    Thanks Ro.;)

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson
  3. MJ- just sprinkle a little mealworm dust over that watermelon to keep the keepers from stealing it. :)

    Posted by Kristen
  4. Director Comment :

    How the heck to Jessi not get watermelon juice on her shirt?

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  5. hahahahah that was fantastic!

    Posted by Kimberly
  6. Keeper Comment :

    Very true, Kristen!;) And Sherry, Jessi said she actually did have the juice all over her face and clothes but the camera hid it well. Fortunately we shot the video at the end of the day so she didn’t have to go outside much after that.

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Forget the porridge, give me cotton candy!

July 1st, 2012

Every Thursday the animal department staff (along with any volunteers or museum staff that can tolerate the keepers) go to lunch together somewhere off campus. Occasionally we splurge and go to Golden Corral. A few weeks ago some of the keepers noticed there was blue cotton candy in the dessert section. We decided to take all the cotton candy they had (of course, we waited until we were on our way out to snag it all) so that we could see if our bears would like it!

Now, we wouldn’t just give our bears cotton candy for no good reason. There is, in fact, a method to our cotton candy madness. You see, often times when we give our animals medicine we have to disguise it in something yummy that they like to eat (you can read more about this in Jill’s post here.)

Mimi, currently our oldest bear, is especially hard to please when it comes to taking medicine. It seems no matter how much we try to disguise her meds with the yummiest of treats, she always knows when we’re up to no good and she refuses to take them.  Sherry thought that maybe cotton candy could be added to the list of things that our bears would love and would be willing to take their meds with.

This is not a treat that they would receive very often, but considering it’s just a little bit of sugar and a lot of air, it seems like a decent treat to try. So we grabbed the cotton candy and ran some taste tests with all the bears to see if they would like it. Watch the video and decide for yourself!

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Join the conversation:

  1. Do the bears get their teeth brushed like the ferrets?

    Posted by Wendy
  2. Director Comment :

    It’s much harder to brush a bear’s teeth than the teeth of ferrets. The keepers will eventually work “teeth brushing” into the operant conditioning routine. We’ll definitely take video of that!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  3. there is so much about this post that i like, marilyn. everything from walking out of golden corral with all of the blue cotton candy…to watching the bears (oh i miss those bears) nosh on the goods…to the end credits. great post! thank you.

    Posted by Leiana
  4. Keeper Comment :

    Thanks Leiana! This was a fun post to do and watching the bears eat the cotton candy for the first time was quite enjoyable.:)

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

QuikPost: hoarders

April 19th, 2012
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The last couple of days we have been watching our muskrats closely because we were concerned one of them may have been acting a bit lethargic. So you can imagine what a pleasant surprise it was to see them both running around the exhibit early this morning!

Most of our visitors that come regularly usually only see our muskrats sleeping in their wooden house. That’s because they tend to be most active in the morning (at least for the time in which we are here), after they have been fed by the keepers. Our muskrats aren’t too keen on getting close to the keepers, so they wait until we leave the exhibit and then come out to see what kind of food they have been given for the day. Then they get busy eating and hoarding! Yes, that’s right, our muskrats will stock pile their food in their wooden house. Which is actually quite smart of them, because it means if they wake up during the day and are hungry, they have their meal right next to them instead of having to go out into the exhibit and bring it back.

I managed to get some of the hoarding on video, and it’s quite cute! Clearly, one of the muskrats likes to collect the food in the house, while the other muskrat has a specific spot at the edge of their pool where he enjoys eating.

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Videos of Ursula

October 19th, 2011

Here’s a couple of videos that were taken of Ursula over the last couple of years. in this first video, there was a particularly heavy snow that we got one winter and one of our previous keepers, Cassidy, got some video of Urse walking around and digging in the snow. Her thick coat made her seem oblivious to the cold weather and snow that was still falling at the time (you can see some of the snow on her back).

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This next video was taken  in the spring/summer 2009, and Urse was enjoying a swim. Urse was always a fan of the water and she often liked to wade in the pools. In the house where we have large tubs of water for the bears, she would often times be seen by keepers splashing the water everywhere and seemingly having a great time in the process. These endearing moments are just a couple of things that we will miss about her.

Three years ago I posted a Creature Feature on Ursula talking about her favorite foods, her antics as a youngster, and moments she had with keepers and enrichment. You can click here if you’d like to read that post and learn more about Ursula.

In the last couple of days, the keepers have received great support and kind words from the other museum staff and it is very much appreciated. All of us here at the museum have our own favorite memories of Urse, whether it be from behind the scenes while caring for her or from bear overlook while watching her eat, sleep, swim, interact with enrichment, or tell the pesky younger bears to go away. I think it is safe to say that Urse will have a special place in many of our hearts for a long time to come. If you have a special memory of Urse while visiting the museum please feel free to share it with us in the comment section.

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

QuikPost: Video of the wolves howling!

March 24th, 2011

One morning last week, Katy and I were in Explore The Wild when the wolves started howling. Katy managed to record it with her camera.  It was awesome to watch them howling in front of us, so make sure to watch the video and have the volume up!

(Special thanks to Sherry for spending 19 minutes of her time downloading the video so that she could unknowingly steal this post from me, until Katy stopped her and told her the post was mine…)

This is our female red wolf howling.

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Join the conversation:

  1. Please post more of these videos.
    I really enjoyed viewing the howling.

    Posted by Linda Feaster
  2. Is that an ambulance siren in the background? Were they howling at a siren?

    Posted by Emily
  3. MY GERMAN SHEPHERD & I LISTENED TO THE HOWLING TOGETHER. HE WAS VERY ATTENTIVE AND EXCITED. BUT HE DID NOT JOIN IN.
    ALTOGETHER IT SOUNDED LIKE THEY WERE HAVING A VERY GOOD COMMUNAL SING!

    Posted by PHIL RUSH
  4. Keeper Comment :

    Linda, we will certainly try our best to get more videos up like this for you to see and hear!

    Emily, yes! They were, in fact, howling at a siren. Sirens are the #1 thing that will get our wolves to howl. For them, the sirens must sound similar to a wolf (or wolves) from another pack howling.

    Phil, glad your german shepherd found it interesting!

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson
  5. i love wolves

    Posted by mallory
  6. I have never heard red wolves, thanks for the chance! I do think they sound alot more “coyote” in their energy & vocals altho their deeper voices are more wolfy. I am an animal keeper for wolves and coyotes at Animal Ark, a sanctuary for non releasables in Reno, NV.

    Posted by Jan
  7. Keeper Comment :

    Thanks for your comment, Jan. And thanks for taking a look at our blog! We are always excited to find out that other people from the zoo keeping world visit our site and enjoy the content. We hope to hear from you again!

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

QuikPost: Watersnake catching dinner

February 2nd, 2011

I came across this old video that I took of our watersnake catching a fish for dinner. Notice how slow and methodical he is while approaching the fish. And the strike was so fast that it even made me jump!

Warning:  If you are squeamish about animals eating other animals, you may not want to watch this video.

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  1. Keeper Comment :

    Just so EVERYONE knows, Erin apparently posted this video of the watersnake in 2009. I didn’t realize she had, so I posted it. However, she’s threatening me now, so I have to give her the credit first. There you go, Erin!

    Posted by Marilyn Johnson

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Creature Feature: Ladybelle the ferret

January 28th, 2011

Ladybelle came to live at the museum in September 2010, and was donated to us by a private owner. She was already 5 years old when we acquired her, because she was born in August 2005. She lives in the Education Holding Room (EHR) behind the scenes and is used for birthday parties and educational classes. She is great at being handled, so she makes for a wonderful animal that children can pet. But like most ferrets, once you put her on the floor she will quickly start exploring and possibly even get into some mischief! Domestic ferrets are typically inquisitive and playful animals (when they’re not sleeping, which they do a lot of), but Ladybelle isn’t quite as rambunctious as some of our previous ferrets. Yet, it’s still fun to watch her in action during her afternoon exercise time. She has to be constantly monitored by a keeper or volunteer when she is on the floor, to make sure she doesn’t get into anything she’s not supposed to!

Here’s a video of Ladybelle while she explores the animal support hall behind the scenes (sorry about the poor quality of the video). You may be able to meet Ladybelle yourself at your next birthday party or inside a classroom while you’re on a school field trip!

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  1. Excellent site! I can’t wait to see more. Cheers.

    Posted by Sherise Quiel

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: Max and his stump

January 17th, 2011

Kimberly shared the stump story, along with photos of the bears and the stumps.  Jim, our landscape environments director and deliverer of the stumps to the yards, caught this video of the end of Max’s initial meeting with his stump.

Enjoy.

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by , Keeper
I have been working at the museum since 2003, and I feel fortunate to have a job where I can start my day with amazing animals surrounding me. I enjoy camping, hiking and rock climbing in my spare time when the weather is nice.
I work Tuesday through Saturday and spend a lot of time behind the scenes, but you might find me at a public program or feeding the farmyard animals in the afternoon.

Yona on ice

December 31st, 2010

With the cold weather we’ve been having recently (especially in the evenings), the moat in our bear exhibit has frozen over sooner than usual. We always expect freezing of the moat to occur in late January and through February, but this winter it has happened in December! Even with temperatures now getting warmer during the day and typically melting any ice or snow on the ground, the warmer weather doesn’t necessarily thaw the ice in the moat because it doesn’t get direct sunlight.

Well, the ice in the moat finally became thick enough that the bears could walk on it. Yesterday, Kimberly and I watched Yona and Gus venture out on the ice to come greet us while we were breaking up the ice with long poles from the bear viewing area.  Although Yona and Gus did some playing on the ice that we didn’t capture on video, I still got some footage of Yona investigating her newly frozen ice rink. You might notice the large sheets of ice that are frozen into the new ice that had formed overnight. Those sheets of ice are from Sherry breaking up the moat the day before, and then the water re-freezing with the broken sheets inside of it!

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Yona Update

July 5th, 2010

It’s been almost one month since Yona had her day at the vet school.  Just about all of the reports are in and the talking continues to determine what the best course of action will be. We will almost definitely be doing surgery in late September when the weather cools to remove the bone fragment from her arm (her medial coronoid process – a bone in her elbow- has fragmented). As always, we’ll keep you updated.

Check out the video to see a little of Yona’s vet school visit.

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