Posts Tagged ‘watermelons’

by , Keeper
I started out as a volunteer in February 2013 and became a full fledged keeper in October 2013. I love birds, mainly raptors. When I'm not working I like to read and play tennis. I have two dogs and two cats.
I work Tuesday through Saturday mostly out in Explore the Wild. You might be able to see me at the Meet the Keeper program at 2:00pm or training the Lemurs!

Watermelons!

June 9th, 2014

For Memorial Day, six watermelons were donated for our bears to celebrate the holiday. Below are a few pictures of them enjoying their tasty treat!

photo 2

photo 3

photo 4

 

 

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  1. What a riviting post! Thank you for giving this behind the scenes look at the holiday festivities!

    Posted by Kyle

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

QuikPost: thanks for your watermelon donations

August 27th, 2013

We’ve had over 60 watermelons donated this summer. Here are a few photos of the bears reaping the rewards. I’ll post more photos in the future too:

 

name the bears?

 

I love Mimi’s hair style don’t you!

 

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Summer is here so it’s time for watermelons

June 20th, 2013

Summer is here so  it’s watermelon season. We LOVE getting watermelons for the animals! The initial benefit is we get to pile them all on someone’s desk (it used to be Kristen and now it’s Aaron’s desk). Please drop off watermelons at the Admissions Desk or at Gate # 1.

 

So many of the animals seem to love watermelon:

Lemurs

Bears

Farmyard critters.

A video of watermelon eating!

 

We’ll be having Watermelon Day again this year on Friday August 2nd. We’ll get the schedule of events up as we get closer.

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

National Watermelon Day

August 3rd, 2011

box turtle in a watermelon ring

WHO KNEW that today was National Watermelon Day (Google it, really).

 

So in honor of this great day, consider bringing a watermelon to the Museum. Our old girl Ursula is taking her medicine with watermelon. Many of our critters eat watermelon. We’ll be feeding watermelons to our animals throughout the day.

Checkout some past blog posts honoring this amazing BERRY:

bears eating watermelon

loads of watermelon

Watermelon poop

 

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  1. Sherry, that is tortoisein the ring. He does look tiny compared to the watermelons.

    Posted by kimberly
  2. Director Comment :

    ah yes, it is indeed Franklin. Thanks for the correction Kimberly.

    Posted by Sherry Samuels
  3. I hope there’s a missing preposition in the sentence: “We’ll be feeding watermelons our animals throughout the day.”

    I didn’t know that watermelons were carnivores!

    Posted by Danielle
  4. Director Comment :

    we do have carnivorous watermelons here!
    (thanks, I added the “to”)

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Thanks for the watermelons

August 1st, 2011

We Tweeted and posted that we needed watermelons  for Ursula to take her medicine in. Over 30 have arrived thus far, and yesterday, the keepers must have had a little extra time as they made some art and animal enrichment out of it.

Chicken Little and lots of watermelons

 

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  1. Can you still use some watermelons??? If so, I will bring a couple over this afternoon..

    MIke

    Posted by Mike
  2. Director Comment :

    We’d love more watermelons. Thanks Mike!

    Posted by Sherry Samuels

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Watermelon Sale!

July 19th, 2010

Watermelons are on sale this week and I am SO EXCITED!

Catch up on some past watermelon posts:

bears eating watermelon

watermelon (what it looks like when bears eat a lot of watermelon- just read the post, you’ll understand).

watermelon storage

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by , Director
I've been at the Museum sooooo long - longer than many of our interns have been alive. I do a little bit of everything as part of my job: care for the animals, work with the keepers and other staff, spend time with guests. Lucky me!
I spend a lot of time behind-the-scenes, or here after hours, but if you really want to see me, you'll have to sign-up for a behind-the-scenes program.

Bears & Watermelon

August 13th, 2009

Some photos of our bears when we toss watermelons in the pool. It happens like this:

1. Bear comes over to pool and tries to get watermelon without getting in the water. Many attempts made to reach watermelon with paws. Gus in particular seems to not want to go in the water too much.

2. Give up and head into water. Use paws to stabilize watermelon enough to get a good bite. Once watermelon is secure in teeth, paddle to shore.

3. Arrive on land. Shake off. Try to make sure watermelon does not roll back into pool. Try to keep your watermelon all to yourself (If Mimi gets a watermelon, she walks away with it, at least 40 feet or more, away from the pool and away from the other bears).


4. Take big bites through rind to get to the good stuff.


5. Keep working on your melon until you have worked down to the rind.

This is Virginia in the last photo. If you look closely you can see she has more than one watermelon. She is the one who goes into the pool the easiest and quickest and sometimes gets more than one. I’ve seen Gus more than once “steal” some of Virginia’s watermelons.

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  1. Joey, Johnny, and I hear reading. We really got a good laugh from your story and pictures! We especially like the part about how you're not supposed to let it roll back in after you get it out!

    Posted by Maryann Goldman
  2. Glad you enjoyed the photos/story. Watching the bears gather and eat watermelons from the pool is a treat.My neighbor just left 10 watermelons in my truck for the bears. THANKS!We'll cut some in half and freeze them- watching the bears try and eat frozen watermelons is pretty funny too.

    Posted by Sherry
  3. I discovered that different species of bears eat watermelon differently when I was doing Animal Enrichment activities at the Kathmandu City zoo: Sloth Bears (who live in the lowland jungles and eat ants and termites) rip the melons open with their extra long claws and slurp the juicy bits up with a sound remarkably like a hoover vacuum cleaner leaving the rind, Himalayan Black Bears (live much higher in the mountains and have a diet similar to the North American Black bear) on the other hand sit on their haunches with the watermelon in their "laps" and very neatly and carefully eat the rind and melon together, spiraling down from the top to the bottom and not spilling a single seed! (sample size of two bears of each species) it would be interesting to compare the watermelon eating habits of even more bears around the world!!

    Posted by Bronwyn

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by , Keeper
Although a native tarheel, I came to the museum from Texas, where I taught Biology courses at a small college. In graduate school I studied the behavior and ecology of marine organisms (mostly crabs, lobsters and sea turtles).
You can find me in the Animal Department Monday-Thursday. Fridays I work for the Department of Innovation and Learning all day.

Watermelon

July 20th, 2009

We have been dealing with a lot of watermelons in the animal department lately. They are truly multipurpose berries. They are great food for bears and a great way to welcome back a coworker from vacation.

Sherry and I noticed some evidence of watermelon consumption in the bear house the other day.

The bears obviously coordinated their defecations in order to teach us a lesson about how plant pigments are processed in the digestive tract.

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by , Keeper
I started volunteering at the museum when I was 13 (I'm 22, and they pay me now, which is nice). Favorite work activities include, but are not limited to: bathing our steer, talking about bears, playing guitar (sometimes for the animals) and riding my bike around grounds. And blogging, of course.
I work Tues-Sat and can be tweeched @ernbrn.

Why You Should Never Go On Vacation

June 26th, 2009
Or: How to kill 2 birds with 46 watermelons.
Summer is here! And its arrival bares the fruit of watermelons aplenty! Sherry seized the summer sales and supplied our salivating species with some watermelon sustenance. She bought 26 so far, with about 20 more to come later next week. We gave 7 already to the bears (and I smuggled one out of the truck for the keepers for the next crazy hot day), but a problem arose when we realized we had nowhere to store the rest of them.
Luckily! keeper Kristen is on vacation, and the longstanding tradition is to do some hilarious prank on her desk when she’s gone. And so, we are able to kill 2 birds with 46 watermelons (and that’s why you should never go on vacation)!

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  1. It has become such a tradition to trash Kristen's desk when she is gone that she now makes it a point to arrive 30 minutes early on her first day back just so that she can sit down to check her email! hahaha!

    Posted by Marilyn

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